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  1. Why It's OK to Be a Sports Fan.Alfred Archer & Jake Wojtowicz - forthcoming - New York: Routledge.
    This book offers readers a pitch side seat to the ethics of fandom. Its accessible six chapters are aimed both at true sports fans whose conscience may be occasionally piqued by their pastime, and at those who are more certain of the moral hazards involved in following a team or sport. -/- Why It’s OK to Be a Sports Fan wrestles with a range of arguments against fandom and counters with its own arguments on why being a fan is very (...)
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  2. Trophy Hunting as Conservation Strategy?Garrett Pendergraft - 2021 - SAGE Business Cases.
    Should we kill animals to save animals? This question lies at the heart of this case study. Sovereign nations have an interest in protecting and conserving their natural resources, and in particular their distinctive flora and fauna. As they seek to promote these interests, they inevitably face the economic question of how they are going to finance their conservation efforts. One way of answering this question is to engage in the practice of selling big game hunting licenses and using the (...)
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  3. Sport-related neurotrauma and neuroprotection: Are Return-to-play protocols justified by paternalism?L. Syd M. Johnson - 2015 - Neuroethics 1 (8):15-26.
    Sport-related neurotrauma annually affects millions of athletes worldwide. The return-to-play protocol (RTP) is the dominant strategy adopted by sports leagues and organizations to manage one type of sport-related neurotrauma: concussions. RTPs establish guidelines for when athletes with concussions are to be removed from competition or practice, and when they can return. RTPs are intended to be neuroprotective, and to protect athletes from some of the harms of sport-related concussions, but there is athlete resistance to and noncompliance with RTPs. This prompts (...)
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  4. Korruption im Sport: Transparenz als goldene Regel der Korruptionsbekämpfung.Sylvia Schenk - 2018 - Polis 22 (1):22-23.
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  5. Sport mit Courage – Extremismusprävention und Demokratiebildung im und durch Sport.Gerd Bücker - 2018 - Polis 22 (1):20-21.
  6. Fußball von seiner schönsten Seite? Hierarchische Geschlechterverhältnisse in Fußballsport und Gesellschaft.Gabriele Sobiech - 2018 - Polis 22 (1):17-19.
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  7. Dopingbekämpfung als zentrale Aufgabe der Sportpolitik.Henk Eric Meier - 2018 - Polis 22 (1):14-16.
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  8. Die Lage der Menschenrechte in Russland vor der Fußball WM.Johannes Voswinkel - 2018 - Polis 22 (1):11-13.
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  9. Gamesmanship in Professional Darts: A Response to Leota, Turp and Howe.James Cartlidge - 2021 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 16 (4):489-502.
    This paper evaluates Howe and Leota/Turp's accounts of gamesmanship by examining case studies of gamesmanship from professional darts. While Leota and Turp make some substantial improvements on Howe in reconceptualizing the idea of sporting excellence, I claim that there are points of criticism that must be addressed, notably in their claims that sports do not prescribe necessary skills, and that it is impossible to distinguish between legitimate sporting strategy unaccounted for by the rules on the one hand, and gamesmanship on (...)
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  10. Why Break the Rules – in Life and in Sport?Miroslav Imbrisevic - 2020 - Idrottsforum.
    In life there can be good reasons to break the rules. Some sports philosophers have suggested that this also holds for games. In this essay I will compare and contrast reasons for rule-breaking in life and in sports. Some of my focus will be on recent attempts to defend strategic fouling (by Eylon & Horowitz, Russell, and Flynn). Supporters of strategic fouling try to provide a philosophical underpinning for the practice, but they ignore the genealogy of such rule-violations. I will (...)
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  11. Hero and Antihero: An Ethic and Aesthetic Reflection of the Sports.Carlos Rey Perez - 2019 - Physical Culture and Sport. Studies and Research 80 (1):48-56.
    In Ancient Greece, the figure of the hero was identified as a demigod, possessed of altruistic and virtuous deeds. When Pierre de Coubertin reinstated the Olympic Games, the athlete was personified as a modern hero. Its antithesis, the anti-hero, has more virtue that defects, no evil but he does not care on the means to achieve his goals. In the eyes of everyone involved in sports competition, these characters captivate and at the same time, create conflicts of ethics and aesthetics. (...)
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Bioethics and Sport
  1. A Response to Cultural Arguments in the Renewed Disputes over the Ethics of Bullfighting.Gabriel E. Andrade - 2021 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 16 (1):50-65.
    Bullfighting has a strong historical tradition in Spain, but now it is beginning to be challenged by various sectors in society. The debate about the ethics of bullfighting is by no means new. But,...
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  2. Doping in Sport: A Defence.Thomas Søbirk Petersen - 2020 - London and New York; UK and USA: Routledge.
    It has become a mantra, that doping is immorally and therefore should be punished with exclusion, fines and stigmatization. In most parts of the world, the doping debate is characterised by an extreme tunnel vision since all athletes, politicians and sports managers who have public airtime express that doping is bad or the invention of the devil. -/- The purpose of 'Doping in Sport: A Defence' is to identify, clarify and challenge some of the central arguments that are used in (...)
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  3. A Moral Defense of Trophy Hunting and Why It Fails.S. P. Morris - 2021 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 15 (3):386-399.
    This is a critique of Timothy Hsiao’s ‘A Moral Defense of Trophy Hunting.’ I argue that Hsiao’s arguments on pain, consciousness, behavior, cruelty, and necessity all fail. More importantly, I argue against his broader conclusion that non-human animals ‘do not have any inherent moral significance.’ My conclusion is that Hsiao’s moral defense of trophy hunting fails.
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  4. Sports Betting, Horse Racing and Nanobiosensors – An Ethical Evaluation.Robert Evans & Michael McNamee - 2020 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 15 (2):208-226.
    Horse racing has begun to enter an economic decline in many countries, notably represented by a decline in revenues in betting volumes. A number of reasons may be attributed to this: the success of...
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  5. Sport and Covid-19.Andrew Edgar - 2021 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 15 (1):1-2.
    My last editorial was written before the world became aware of the covid-19 pandemic, and the impact that it would have on our lives. (Editorials are written some three months before publication, l...
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  6. The Ethics of Cloning Horses in Polo.Francisco Javier Lopez Frias & Cesar R. Torres - 2019 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (1):125-139.
    The ethics of using genetic engineering to enhance athletic performance has been a recurring topic in the sport philosophy and bioethics literature. In this article, we analyze the ethics of cloning horses for polo competition. In doing so, we critically examine the arguments most commonly advanced to justify this practice. In the process, we raise concerns about cloning horses for polo competition, centering on normative aspects pertaining to sport ethics usually neglected by defenders of cloning. In particular, we focus on (...)
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Cheating in Sport
  1. Sport Realism: A Law-Inspired Theory of Sport.Aaron Harper - 2022 - Lanham, MD, USA: Lexington Books.
    Aaron Harper defends a new theory of sport—sport realism—focusing on sport operations and the decisions made by sports officials like umpires and referees. Sport realism offers an explanation of sport as it is played, along with normative assessment of ethical issues in sport like cheating and rules disputes.
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  2. Doping in Sport: A Defence.Thomas Søbirk Petersen - 2020 - London and New York; UK and USA: Routledge.
    It has become a mantra, that doping is immorally and therefore should be punished with exclusion, fines and stigmatization. In most parts of the world, the doping debate is characterised by an extreme tunnel vision since all athletes, politicians and sports managers who have public airtime express that doping is bad or the invention of the devil. -/- The purpose of 'Doping in Sport: A Defence' is to identify, clarify and challenge some of the central arguments that are used in (...)
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  3. Setting the record straight: a defense of vacating wins in response to rules violations.Seth Bordner & Chase Wrenn - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 48 (2):169-185.
    ABSTRACT Sometimes, teams or players violate the rules of their leagues or associations. And sometimes, their leagues or associations respond by striking their wins from the official record. Especially in American college sports governed by the NCAA, this practice of vacating results is unpopular and widely decried. It should not be. Vacating wins can be an appropriate response to rules violations in higher-order competitions in the same way that it can be appropriate to call back a scoring play due to (...)
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  4. What is Wrong with Throwing Spitballs?Dale Murray - 2019 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 15 (1):1-13.
    Controversy over the use of performance–enhancing drugs in athletics has involved sometimes rather complex technological advances (e.g. ‘designer steroids’ in track, and anabolic steroids in...
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  5. Cheating and gaming the system in ancient athletics.Susan Stephens - 2020 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 47 (3):391-402.
    The contradictions and ambiguities in, admiration for, and potential benefits derived from cheating in modern athletics have numerous parallels in ancient Greek culture. Because both ancient and mo...
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  6. Enhancement and Cheating: Implications for Policy in Sport.Justin Caouette & Allen Habib - 2018 - In David Boonin (ed.), Palgrave Handbook of Philosophy and Public Policy. London, UK: Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 523-533.
    There is a widely held view that the rules forbidding the use of performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) are justified on grounds that utilizing these drugs constitutes cheating . In this chapter we engage with this assumption. Relying on an interpretative approach borrowed from Ronald Dworkin, we offer a novel analysis of cheating, one that makes it out to be a matter of inhibiting the attainment of certain sorts of achievements. These achievements are the important goods at the centre of sport, (...)
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  7. Associations Between Sport Participation, Goal and Sportspersonship Orientations, and Moral Reasoning.M. Rosie Shrout, Dana K. Voelker, Geoffrey D. Munro & Karla A. Kubitz - 2017 - Ethics and Behavior 27 (6):502-518.
    This study examined associations between level of sport participation, goal and sportspersonship orientations, and moral reasoning in sport and nonsport situations and orientation by sport participation interactions. Participants were individuals with elite, high school, and youth sport participation. When judging sport situations, individuals who participated in elite sports demonstrated poorer moral reasoning than those who participated in high school and youth sports. At low levels of sportspersonship, individuals who participated in youth sports demonstrated higher moral reasoning than those who participated (...)
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  8. Simulation, seduction, and bullshit: cooperative and destructive misleading.Leslie A. Howe - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (3):300-314.
    This paper refines a number of theoretical distinctions relevant to deceptive play, in particular the difference between merely misleading actions and types of simulation commonly considered beyond the pale, such as diving. To do so, I rely on work in the philosophy of language about conversational convention and implicature, the distinction between lying and misleading, and their relation to concepts of seduction and bullshit. The paper works through a number of possible solutions to the question of what is wrong with (...)
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  9. The Only Good Reason to Ban Steroids in Baseball: To Prevent an Arms Race.Jacob Beck - 2013 - The Atlantic:0-0.
    I review six bad arguments for banning performance-enhancing drugs from sports--and a seventh good one.
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  10. Harm, risk, and doping analogies: A counter-response to Kious.Oskar MacGregor & Mike McNamee - 2011 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (3):201-207.
    Brent Kious has objected to our previous criticism of his views on doping, maintaining that we, by and large, misrepresented his position. In this response, we strengthen our original misgivings, arguing that (1) his views on risk of harm in sport are either uncontroversially true (not inconsistent with the views of many doping opponents) or demonstrably false (attribute to doping opponents an overly simplistic view), (2) his use of analogies (still) indicates an oversimplification of many issues surrounding the question of (...)
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  11. Philosophy on steroids: A reply.Oskar MacGregor & Mike McNamee - 2010 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (6):401-410.
    Brent Kious has recently attacked several arguments generally adduced to support anti-doping in sports, which are widely supported by the sports medicine fraternity, international sports federations, and international governments. We show that his attack does not succeed for a variety of reasons. First, it uses an overly inclusive definition of doping at odds with the WADA definition, which has global, if somewhat contentious, currency. Second, it seriously misconstrues the position it attacks, rendering the attack without force against a more balanced (...)
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Competition in Sport
  1. Using Animals in the Pursuit of Human Flourishing through Sport.Alex Wolf-Root - 2022 - Journal of Applied Animal Ethics Research 4 (2):179-197.
    Sport provides an arena for human flourishing. For some, this pursuit of a meaningful life through sport involves the use of non-human animals, not least of all through sport hunting. This paper will take seriously that sport – including sport hunting – can provide a meaningful arena for human flourishing. Additionally, it will accept for present purposes that animals are of less moral value than humans. This paper will show that, even accepting these premises, much use of animals for sport (...)
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  2. Ethical and Legal Implications of Third-Party Incentives to Win Matches in European Football.José Luis Pérez Triviño, Francisco Javier Lopez Frias & Michael John McNamee - 2021 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 16 (1):66-80.
    In this paper, we examine the legal case involving the Court of Arbitration of Sport, the Union of European Football Associations, and the Turkish team Eskişehirspor to analyze the leg...
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  3. Rules, Standards, and the Video Assistant Referee in Football.Jan Zglinski - 2020 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 16 (1):3-19.
    Introduced with the hope of reducing refereeing errors and increasing “football justice”, the Video Assistant Referee has attracted much criticism from players and spectators alike. Drawing o...
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  4. Fairness, Regulation of Technology and Enhanced Human: A Comparative Analysis of the Pistorius Case and the Cybathlon.Rémi Richard, Damien Issanchou & Sylvain Ferez - 2020 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 15 (4):507-521.
    Ensuring fairness is a capital issue in any sporting competition. However, fairness is a complex concept. We seek here to offer an analysis of the construction and upholding of fairness within comp...
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  5. Athletic skill and the value of close contests.Erin Flynn - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 48 (2):186-201.
    In this paper I defend an Irreconcilability Thesis, claiming that two commonly held views about athletic contests are in fact incompatible. The first view is that athletic contests are essentially...
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  6. Rethinking the unfair advantage argument.Tena Thau - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 48 (1):63-81.
    Athletes who flout doping bans are generally thought to have gained an unfair advantage. In this paper, I critically examine this view. I begin by defending an effort-based account of desert in sport, explaining why it is preferable to the hybrid account that is favoured in the literature. Drawing on the effort-based account, I construct the Unfair Advantage Argument formally, in what I take to be its most plausible form. I then argue that the Unfair Advantage Argument should be rejected, (...)
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  7. In answer to Orwell: a defence of international sport.Brandon Robshaw - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 48 (1):1-9.
    This paper first considers and rebuts George Orwell's case against international sport. He argues both from general principles and specific examples that international sporting contests lead to org...
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  8. Altering the Narrative of Champions: Recognition, Excellence, Fairness, and Inclusion.Leslie A. Howe - 2020 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 14 (4):496-510.
    This paper is an examination of the concept of recognition and its connection with identity and respect. This is related to the question of how women are or are not adequately recognised or respected for their achievements in sport and whether eliminating sex segregation in sport is a solution. This will require an analysis of the concept of excellence in sport, as well as the relationship between fairness and inclusion in an activity that is fundamentally about bodily movement. I argue (...)
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  9. A stoic critique of contemporary sport.Michael W. Austin - 2020 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 47 (3):330-343.
    In this paper, I examine two contemporary models of sport, the Martial/Commercial Model and the Aesthetic/Recreational Model, from the perspective of Stoic philosophy. Drawing on the writ...
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  10. Gamesmanship as strategic excellence.Josh Leota & Michael-John Turp - 2020 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 47 (2):232-247.
    Contributors to the literature on gamesmanship typically assume that gamesmanship can be clearly distinguished from other legal strategies used in sports. In this article, we argue that this is a m...
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  11. The Moral Rules of Trash Talking: Morality and Ownership.Stephen Kershnar - 2015 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 9 (3):303-323.
    This paper argues that an instance of trash-talking is permissible if and only if the relevant sports organization’s system of rules permits the expression. The argument for this position rests on the notion that if there is no relevant side-constraint on trash-talking, then if the player commits to a moral boundary on trash-talking then that is the moral boundary on trash-talking. I then argued that there is no relevant side-constraint on trash-talking and that the players commit to the ownership theory (...)
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Embodiment and Sport
  1. Partnering as Rhetoric.Ilya Vidrin - 2018 - In Simon Ellis, Hetty Blades & Charlotte Waelde (eds.), A World of Muscle, Bone & Organs: Research and Scholarship in Dance. Coventry, United Kingdom: Coventry University. pp. 112-131.
    Bodily rhetoric is a burgeoning field, with scholars investing attention to the ways in which non-verbal communication mediates change between individuals and groups in complex scenarios, including political settings. Scenarios in which individuals move together – whether in completely extemporaneous situations or in existing forms such as Contact Improvisation, Argentinian Tango, or Classical Pas de Deux – pose a similarly complex communicative problem. Drawing on the work of Lloyd Bitzer, I demonstrate how rhetorical theory provides methodological insight by which we (...)
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  2. Emotions, interaction and the injured sporting body.Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson - 2005 - International Review for the Sociology of Sport 40 (2):221-240..
    Based upon a collaborative autoethnographic research project, this article explores from a sociological perspective the emotional dimension of the injured sporting body. It takes as its analytic focus the journey, rehabilitative, emotional and narrative, of two middle-aged, non-élite, middle/long-distance runners who encountered serious, long-term knee injuries. The paper examines in particular the interactional and narrative elements of the rehabilitative journey, focussing on dimensions of the emotion management, emotion work, and emotional intersubjectivity of the researcher/author and her training partner as they (...)
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  3. Phenomenological physiotherapy: extending the concept of bodily intentionality.Halák Jan & Petr Kříž - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (4):e14.
    This study clarifies the need for a renewed account of the body in physiotherapy to fill sizable gaps between physiotherapeutical theory and practice. Physiotherapists are trained to approach bodily functioning from an objectivist perspective; however, their therapeutic interactions with patients are not limited to the provision of natural-scientific explanations. Physiotherapists’ practice corresponds well to theorisation of the body as the bearer of original bodily intentionality, as outlined by Merleau-Ponty and elaborated upon by enactivists. We clarify how physiotherapeutical practice corroborates Merleau-Ponty’s (...)
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  4. Walking with the Earth: Intercultural Perspectives on Ethics of Ecological Caring.Ignace Haaz & Amélé Adamavi-Aho Ekué (eds.) - 2022 - Geneva, Switzerland: Globethics Publications.
    It is commonly believed that considering nature different from us, human beings (qua rational, cultural, religious and social actors), is detrimental to our engagement for the preservation of nature. An obvious example is animal rights, a deep concern for all living beings, including non-human living creatures, which is understandable only if we approach nature, without fearing it, as something which should remain outside of our true home. “Walking with the earth” aims at questioning any similar preconceptions in the wide sense, (...)
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  5. Qigong, Philosophical Reading, and the Cultivation of Attention: Chinese Contemplative Body Practices and Slow Philosophy.Steven Geisz - 2020 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy (2):1-15.
    Qigong practices are contemplative body practices and meditation techniques that emerge from Chinese philosophical, medical, and martial traditions. This paper argues that qigong is a kind of embod...
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  6. From Slowness to Deepening: The Way of Emersive Awareness.Bernard Andrieu & Petrucia da Nobrega - 2020 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy (2):1-13.
    In this paper three senses of slow sport are demonstrated through three modalities of technical, and as such, it is found within a precise methodology. Self-awareness is defined by paying attention...
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  7. Body Ecology and Emersive Exploration of Self: The Case of Extreme Adventurers.Ana Zimmermann & Bernard Andrieu - 2020 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 15 (4):481-494.
    Body ecology by cosmosis refers to the experience of immersion, or the incorporation of the elements of nature through a body practice, leisure or sport. In this article, we propose comprehensive u...
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  8. The poetics of everyday movement: human movement ecology and urban walking.Sigmund Loland - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 48 (2):219-234.
    ABSTRACT Departing from the hegemonic position of epidemiology in population physical activity research and policy, I argue for the significance of a complementary, holistic approach: human movement ecology. The argument is developed in two steps. In a first step, and using perspectives from body ecology and eco-philosophy, I emphasize the potential in movement of a ’dynamic and spontaneous ecologization’, which opens for the development of ecological consciousness and sustainable practice. In a second step, I test HME towards a ’hard case’: (...)
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  9. Skills, knowledge and expertise in sport: edited by Breivik, Gunnar, London & New York, Routledge, 2017, $155 (Hardback), $47.95 (Paperback), $47.95 (E-book), ISBN 13:978-1138559677. [REVIEW]Jake Wojtowicz - forthcoming - Tandf: Journal of the Philosophy of Sport:1-4.
    Review of Breivik (ed) "Skills, knowledge and expertise in sport".
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  10. Sport and self-love: reflections on boxing and the construction of selfhood.Wivi Andersen - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 48 (1):129-145.
    This article examines whether boxing, despite – or perhaps because – its destructive potential can be an arena for the formation of selfhood. Based on Honneth’s theory of recognition, I sugg...
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  11. Place, Ecological Dynamics and Football.Matthew Gildersleeve - 2021 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 15 (1):139-155.
    In this review article, I will use the phenomenology of place and read it alongside ecological dynamics theories in sport. I will show the many congruences between these two areas of research...
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