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Summary Søren Aabye Kierkegaard (1813-1855) is generally considered to be the father of existentialism. Kierkegaard’s father, a wealthy retired merchant, was a Pietist and hence encouraged his sons Peter Christian and Søren Aabye to study theology at the University of Copenhagen. Kierkegaard received the degree of Magister Artium in 1840, though by that time his interest has shifted from theology to philosophy. He had hoped to receive an academic position in philosophy, but those hopes were never realized. He was closely tied, however, to academic circles, and was, in fact, one of the leading intellectuals of what has come to be known as the Danish “Golden Age.” Kierkegaard was primarily a polemical writer whose works were often responses to the works of contemporaries such at Hans Lassen Martensen and Johann Ludvig Heiberg. He wrote on a broad range of topics from aesthetics to psychology and employed a variety of literary styles from the novel (e.g. Repetition) to more traditional academic treatises (e.g., The Concept of Anxiety). His mature interest was in delineating the relation between Christianity and philosophy with an emphasis on precisely what was involved both cognitively and practically in being Christian. Kierkegaard is thought by many to have coined the expression “leap of faith.” In fact, this expression comes from Lessing and is used by Kierkegaard only ironically.
Key works The two works most central to Kierkegaard’s thought are Philosophical Crumbs (Kierkegaard & Mooney 2009) and the Concluding Unscientific Postscript to the Philosophical Crumbs (Kierkegaard 2009), though his most famous work is undoubtedly Fear and Trembling (Kierkegaard 1986). Philosophical Crumbs introduces the distinction between what Kierkegaard’s pseudonym Johannes Climacus presents as the traditional philosophical account of the relation of the individual to the truth and the account of this relation given by Christianity. The Postscript looks in detail about what it means to become a Christian. Approximately half of Kierkegaard’s works, including those just mentioned, were published under pseudonyms. Among the works published under Kierkegaard’s own name, the most important are arguably Works of Love (Kierkegaard 1998), and Training in Christianity (Kierkegaard 2004).
Introductions Introductory articles: Michelle Kosch, "Kierkegaard" (Kosch 2015) and Piety, "Kierkegaard on Rationality" (Piety 1993). Book length introductory works: C. Stephen Evans’s Kierkegaard: An Introduction (Evans 2009); Alastair Hannay’s Kierkegaard (Hannay 1982); Gregor Malantschuk’s The Controversial Kierkegaard (Malantschuk 1980), and David F. Swenson’s Something About Kierkegaard (Swenson 1945).
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  1. The Problem of Despair: A Kierkegaardian Reading of the Book of Job.Richard Oxenberg - manuscript
    The Book of Job is often read as the Bible's response to theodicy's 'problem of evil.' As a resolution to the logical difficulties of this problem, however, it is singularly unsatisfying. Job's ethical protest against God is never addressed at the level of the ethical. But suggested in Job's final encounter with God is the possibility of a spiritual resolution beyond the ethical. In this paper I examine the Book of Job as a response to the spiritual problem of despair; (...)
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  2. Faith and Sacrifice in Fear and Trembling.Neelesh Pratap - manuscript
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  3. Bakhtin and the Kierkegaardian Revolution.Sergeiy Sandler - manuscript
    Søren Kierkegaard’s influence on the thought of Mikhail Bakhtin has received relatively little attention from Bakhtin scholars (and hardly any attention from Bakhtin scholars in the English-speaking world). Yet, as I argue in this paper, Kierkegaard was among the most important formative influences on Bakhtin's work. This influence is most evident in Bakhtin's early ethical philosophy, but remains highly relevant in later periods. Reading Bakhtin as a follower and developer of Kierkegaard's fundamental philosophical insights provides us with a key to (...)
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  4. The Concept of ‘Subject’ in Søren Kierkegaard’s Philosophy.Türker Armaner - unknown - Yeditepe'de Felsefe (Philosophy at Yeditepe) 2.
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  5. Irony as a Post-Romantic Possibility for Art: Kierkegaard's Reply to Hegel.James Crooks - unknown - Eidos: The Canadian Graduate Journal of Philosophy 3.
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  6. Kierkegaard and the Ground of Morality.Alison Assiter - forthcoming - Acta Kierkegaardiana.
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  7. Marrying a Married Man: A Postscript.Monique Borgerhoff Mulder - forthcoming - Human Nature: A Critical Reader.
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  8. Love’s Forgiveness: Kierkegaard, Resentment, Humility and Hope.Christopher Cowley - forthcoming - International Journal of Philosophical Studies:1-5.
    Forgiveness is a perennially rich topic in philosophy. It gathers together questions of ethics as well as philosophy of mind, action and emotion; it has analytic and Continental slants, and an impo...
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  9. Moving Forward: The Existential Motion of the Self in Kierkegaard's Pseudonymous Works.Joshua Avery Dawson - forthcoming - Heythrop Journal.
  10. Ambiguous and Deeply Differentiated: Kierkegaard's Relations to Hegel1.Ame Gren - forthcoming - Kierkegaardiana.
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  11. Paradigmatic Despair and the Quest for a Kierkegaard Anthropology.Alasdair Hannay - forthcoming - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 1:149-163.
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  12. What It Means to Be Immortal: Afterlife and Aesthetic Communication in Kierkegaard's Concluding Unscientific Postscript.Lasse Horne Kjældgaard - forthcoming - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook.
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  13. Kant's and Kierkegaard's Conception of Ethics' In.Ulrich‘Der Kantianismus Kierkegaard’S. Knappe - forthcoming - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook.
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  14. Kierkegaard and Gift: The Problem with ‘Kenotic Love’ in Light of Kierkegaard's ‘Gift Theory’.Myka S. H. Lahaie - forthcoming - Modern Theology.
  15. Either Kierkegaard/Or Nietzsche: Moral Philosophy in a New Key [Book Review].J. Lippitt - forthcoming - Ars Disputandi: The Online Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
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  16. Indirect Communication by Kierkegaard.Poul Lübcke - forthcoming - Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica.
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  17. JR Dúvida Antiga E Dúvida Moderna Segundo Kierkegaard.Maia Neto - forthcoming - Revista Latinoamericana de Filosofia.
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  18. Michael Weston, Kierkegaard and Modern Continental Philosophy.J. Ree - forthcoming - Radical Philosophy.
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  19. 'Peter Fenves,Chatter': Language and History in Kierkegaard.J. Ree - forthcoming - Radical Philosophy.
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  20. Soren Kierkegaard Newsletter No. 19.Aar Kierkegaard Seminar - forthcoming - Philosophy.
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  21. Form and Faith in Sheridan Hough's "Kierkegaard's Dancing Tax Collector". [REVIEW]Susanna Siegel - forthcoming - Syndicate Philosophy.
    I argue that in Sheridan Hough's book Kierkegaard's Dancing Tax Collector, the distinctive and novelistic literary form is not a playful, whimsical, or otherwise contingent feature, but a structure that's needed to convey the account of Kierkegaardian faith as practical in nature.
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  22. Soren Kierkegaard Literature 2002-2004 A Bibliography.Julia Watkin, Aage Jorgensen & Noel Stewart Adams - forthcoming - Kierkegaardiana.
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  23. Kant and Kierkegaard on Faith.Marc Williams - forthcoming - Logos. Anales Del Seminario de Metafísica [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, España].
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  24. Kierkegaard on the Transformative Power of Art.Antony Aumann - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (3):429-442.
    ABSTRACT Kierkegaard seeks to inspire transformations. His aim is to get us to devote our lives to God or the Good rather than our own personal enjoyment – to abandon the aesthetic life in favour of the ethical or religious one. Drawing on Laurie Paul and Agnes Callard’s recent work, I maintain that two obstacles stand in Kierkegaard’s way. First, transformations involve adopting a new perspective on the world, one we cannot fully grasp ahead of time. Second, transformations also involve (...)
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  25. Kierkegaard on Imagination: Possibility, Hope, and the Imitation of Christ.Hjördis Becker-Lindenthal - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (3):484-499.
    ABSTRACT What happens to the imagination in the process of overturning despair and becoming an authentic self? Using the mystic concept of Entbildung as heuristics, the article re-examines the relation of the imagination and the will in Kierkegaard. Analysing the rarely compared texts Practice in Christianity and the first of the Ethical-Religious Essay, and paying close attention to the semantics of the image, the article argues that grace and imagination cooperate in the process of Entbildung, restoring the self’s receptivity for (...)
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  26. The Sublime in the Pedestrian: Figures of the Incognito in Fear and Trembling.Martijn Boven - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (3):500-513.
    This article demonstrates a novel conceptualization of sublimity: the sublime in the pedestrian. This pedestrian mode of sublimity is exemplified by the Biblical Abraham, the central figure of Kierkegaard’s pseudonymous Fear and Trembling. It is rooted in the analysis of one of the foundational stories of the three monotheistic religions: Abraham’s averted sacrifice of his son Isaac. The defining feature of this new, pedestrian mode of sublimity is that is remains hidden behind what I call a total incognito. It is (...)
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  27. Existentialists or Mystics. Kierkegaard and Murdoch on Imagination and Fantasy in Ethical Life.Rob Compaijen - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (3):443-455.
    ABSTRACT In this paper I explore the role of imagination in ethical life. I do so by discussing the thought of Kierkegaard and Murdoch, both of whom stress the importance as well as the dangerousness of imagination for ethical life. Both distinguish between proper imagination and mere fantasy in dealing with the tension. Anti-Climacus’s views on imagination emphasize that the proper use of the imagination plays a vital role in realizing the fundamental ethical task of becoming ourselves, whereas fantasy only (...)
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  28. The Struggle is Real: An Exploration of 19th Century Notions of Striving, Dialectic, and General Unrest.Dustin Gray - 2021 - Dialogue: Journal of Phi Sigma Tau 63 (2-3):160-7.
    In the comprehension of many 19th century European philosophers, there seems ever present in much of the work, a shared notion of struggle. This notion seems mainly to arise within the confines of human consciousness. The notion of struggle is in fact pervasive in contemporary thought as well, and could simply be inherent to human nature. However, I will maintain specific focus on the notion of struggle as brought to light by a sampling of works by three relevant 19th century (...)
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  29. Hope and the Chaos of Imagination in Kant and Kierkegaard.Eleanor Helms - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (3):456-469.
    ABSTRACT Faith for Kierkegaard is ‘beyond’ reason in some senses but not others. Faith is more specific and more subjective than concepts. On the other hand, Kant claims it is the faculty of reason that motivates us to make sense of anything and enables us to take something teleologically as a task, including faith. I begin from Kant’s account of the artistic genius to show how the faculties of imagination and understanding are related for Kant and how Kierkegaard’s description of (...)
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  30. Introduction: Imagination in Kierkegaard and Beyond.Wojciech T. Kaftanski - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (3):405-413.
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  31. The Original Age of Anxiety: Essays on Kierkegaard and His Contemporaries.Lasse Horne Kjældgaard - 2021 - Brill.
    The book proposes a radically revised understanding of the epoch of the Danish Golden Age by investigating the historical and literary contexts of Søren Kierkegaard’s pioneering thoughts on anxiety.
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  32. The Kantian Ethical Perspective Seen From the Existential Philosophy of Søren Kierkegaard’s Victor Eremita.Roman Králik, Arturo Morales Rojas & José García Martín - 2021 - Ethics and Bioethics (in Central Europe) 11 (1-2):48-57.
    This article compares two groundings of ethics: the ethical postulates of Immanuel Kant with the existential thinking of S. Kierkegaard. To achieve this goal, first, it proposes highlighting the fundamental ideas of Kantian ethics; then, secondly, highlighting Kierkegaard’s ethical stance; and finally, contrasting both approaches to identify differences and similarities. Conclusively, we can say that the pure Kantian ethical formality of duty for duty’s sake necessarily dispenses with existential and concrete content; it is an ethics that is grounded in itself, (...)
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  33. Philippe Chevallier, Être soi : une introduction à Kierkegaard, Genève, Labor et Fides, 2020, 192 pages. [REVIEW]Francis Lemelin-Bellerose - 2021 - Philosophiques 48 (1):169-172.
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  34. Silence’ as a Language of Faith and Being: A Comparative Study of Kierkegaard’s and Heidegger’s Uses of ‘Silence.Rojin Mazouji & Mohammad Raayat Jahromi - 2021 - Heythrop Journal 62 (1):39-52.
  35. Hitchcock Meets Kierkegaard: Selfhood and Gendered Forms of Despair in Vertigo and The Sickness Unto Death.Hjördis Becker-Lindenthal - 2020 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 25 (1):285-300.
    The development of Vertigo’s main characters provides a detailed illustration of the dialectics of despair as analysed in Kierkegaard’s The Sickness unto Death, in particular of the so-called ‘masculine’ and ‘feminine’ types of failed selfhood. This article shows the relation of selfhood and despair to dizziness both in Kierkegaard’s work and in Hitchcock’s film, and it examines the religious subtext of Vertigo. The dramatis personae of Judy and Scottie are analysed by applying Kierkegaard’s phenomenology of despair. They display a variety (...)
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  36. Joanna Nowotny: „Kierkegaard ist ein Jude“. Jüdische Kierkegaard Lektüren in Literatur und Philosophie, Göttingen: Wallstein Verlag, 2018, 429 S. [REVIEW]Wolfgang Bock - 2020 - Zeitschrift für Religions- Und Geistesgeschichte 72 (2):217-218.
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  37. Walter Benjamin Als Leser Søren Kierkegaards.Wolfgang Bock - 2020 - Zeitschrift für Religions- Und Geistesgeschichte 72 (1):42-64.
  38. A Perspectival Account of Acedia in the Writings of Kierkegaard.Jared Brandt, Brandon Dahm & Derek McAllister - 2020 - Religions 80 (11):1-23.
    Søren Kierkegaard is well-known as an original philosophical thinker, but less known is his reliance upon and development of the Christian tradition of the Seven Deadly Sins, in particular the vice of acedia, or sloth. As acedia has enjoyed renewed interest in the past century or so, commentators have attempted to pin down one or another Kierkegaardian concept (e.g., despair, heavy-mindedness, boredom, etc.) as the embodiment of the vice, but these attempts have yet to achieve any consensus. In our estimation, (...)
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  39. The Faust Project in Kierkegaard’s Early Journals.Nassim Bravo - 2020 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 25 (1):171-192.
    This article offers a detailed and compact account of what might be called Kierkegaard’s Faust project, that is, the collection of notes, bibliographies and reflections on the mythical German necromancer that the young Kierkegaard registered in his various journals and notebooks from the years 1835 – 1837. As is well known, the young writer presumably intended to pen a book or essay about the universal idea represented by Faust. Additionally, I discuss Kierkegaard’s project within the context of the 1830s, the (...)
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  40. Review of Kierkegaard’s Journals and Notebooks, Volume 7: Journals NB15-NB20. [REVIEW]Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2020 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 125 (4):431-432.
    This review of one in the series of the monumental primary works of Kierkegaard shows him as the champion and, as it were, an inaugurator of the phenomenological turn in both philosophy and literature. The review touches upon serious issues regarding mass culture and Christianity. The review of the eighth volume in this series was published in January 2020, and these two reviews are the first by any Indian Hindu. While discussing Kierkegaard the reviewer touches upon John Caputo's theology derived (...)
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  41. Review of Kierkegaard’s Journals and Notebooks, Volume 9: Journals NB26–NB30. [REVIEW]Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2020 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 125 (6):519-521.
    Niels Jørgen Cappelørn, Alastair Hannay, Bruce H Kirmmse, David D Possen, Joel D S Rasmussen, and Vanessa Rumble working with the Princeton University Press and the Søren Kierkegaard Research Center at the University of Copenhagen have produced this huge work with facsimiles etc. The review comments on Kierkegaard's shrewd observations which are applicable today in the New Media World of information skews in a COVID 19 world. Further; Kierkegaard's attack against mediocrity is commented on. This review finds Kierkegaard on St (...)
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  42. Review of Kierkegaard’s Journals and Notebooks: Volume 10, Journals NB31–NB36. [REVIEW]Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2020 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 125 (07):570-571.
    "Kierkegaard’s output is vast and earlier, was not available in English. Had they been available then certainly [Edith] Stein, [Simone] Weil, [Hannah] Arendt, and [Susan] Neiman would have constructed their theodicies around Kierkegaard more fully, abandoning the charlatanism of Martin Heidegger’s Nazi histrionics. These Princeton hardbacks, handsomely bound, with appealing fonts and meticulous notes will help disseminate Kierkegaard’s writings to a broader audience." This is how this review focussed on Kierkegaard's theodicy sees the volume under review. The reviewer thanks the (...)
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  43. Review of Kierkegaard’s Journals and Notebooks, Volume 8: Journals NB21–NB25. [REVIEW]Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2020 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 125 (1):281-282.
    This is one of a series of reviews of Kierkegaard's Journals and Notebooks.
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  44. Does Kierkegaard’s Rewritten Parable of the Good Samaritan Leave the World to the Devil? Kierkegaard and Adorno on What It Means to Love One’s Neighbor in the Modern World.Iben Damgaard - 2020 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 25 (1):221-240.
    This article critically examines and discusses the charge, raised by Adorno in his essay on Works of Love, that Kierkegaard’s rewriting of the Gospel story of the good Samaritan reduces neighbor love to abstract inwardness. It has been somewhat ignored in the reception of Adorno’s text that he also praises Kierkegaard as a critic of his time. I explore Adorno’s appreciation of this dimension in Works of Love and seek to develop it further by examining Kierkegaard’s sharp eye for discovering (...)
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  45. A Hermeneutic for and From Reading Kierkegaard's For Self-Examination.Nathan Eric Dickman - 2020 - Religions 10 (11):491.
    This essay provides a close reading of Kierkegaard’s later signed text, For Self-Examination. While many of Kierkegaard’s pseudonymous texts often are selected for their philosophically explicit engagements with Hegelian philosophy, I use Hegel’s dialectic of lordship and bondage to draw out how Kierkegaard circumvents it in this one. I first provide historical context, noting how Kierkegaard turned to earnest works after his public humiliation in the Copenhagen newspaper, undermining his ability to deploy irony effectively. Second, I briefly develop Hegel’s lordship (...)
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  46. "Kierkegaard não se desprendeu de Hegel": Notas sobre o juízo de Heidegger sobre Kierkegaard em A hermenêutica da facticidade.Gabriel Ferreira - 2020 - Trans/Form/Ação 1 (43):51-76.
    The course delivered by Heidegger during the Summer semester of 1923, and published later under the title of Ontology – The hermeneutics of facticity, is one of the most important loci in which we can have a glimpse of Kierkegaard’s influence on and importance to Heidegger, as well as of some of his interpretations about the thought of the Dane philosopher. One of them, notwithstanding puts forward a very interesting assessment of the relation between Kierkegaard and Hegel – through F. (...)
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  47. Narrative Variation and the Mood of Freedom in Fear and Trembling.Alexander Jech - 2020 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 25 (1):27-56.
    One of the most distinctive features of Fear and Trembling is Kierkegaard’s use of narrative variations in order to isolate, develop, and highlight the relevant features of his principal theme, the story of Abraham and Isaac, especially Abraham’s final test of faith. The book begins with a preface and ends with an epilogue; immediately within these, Kierkegaard has his pseudonym, Johannes de Silentio, provide such variations in the “Attunement” or Stemning, just following the Preface, and in Problema III, just before (...)
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  48. Kierkegaard on Imitation and Ethics: Towards a Secular Project?Wojciech T. Kaftanski - 2020 - Journal of Religious Ethics 48 (4):557-577.
    This essay demonstrates the prominence of imitation in Kierkegaard’s ethics. I move beyond his idea of authentic existence modeled on Christ and explore the secular dimension of Kierkegaard’s insights about human nature and imitation. I start with presenting imitation as key to understanding the ethical dimension of the relationship between the universal and individual aspects of the human self in Kierkegaard. I then show that Kierkegaard’s moral concepts of “primitivity” and “comparison” are a response to his sociological and psychological observations (...)
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  49. Know Yourself in the Mirror of the Word: Kierkegaard on Self-Knowledge.Kateřina Kolínská - 2020 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 25 (1):111-136.
    The article provides a reconstruction of Kierkegaardʼs conception of self-knowledge, mainly in the light of The Concept of Irony, The Sickness unto Death, Philosophical Fragments and selected upbuilding discourses. The concept of self-knowledge, which in Kierkegaard goes beyond mere epistemology, is shown in its duality, as a process which is for Kierkegaard both substantial and relational: to know oneself is for Kierkegaard both an ethical claim upon man and a religious act whose accomplishment is dependent on Godʼs intervention. The article (...)
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  50. Double Consciousness and Despair: Exploring a Connection Between Søren Kierkegaard and W.E.B. Du Bois.Matthew Kruger - 2020 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 25 (1):265-283.
    This paper explores the connection between Søren Kierkegaard’s concept of despair and W.E.B. Du Bois’ concept of double consciousness. The concepts have been separately argued to share a root in Hegel’s “Unhappy Consciousness,” and further, each notion in part explains the interaction of a person with their culture. The paper seeks to highlight the importance of culture in interpreting Kierkegaard’s despair, and to do so by including a critique via Du Bois that a person’s existence in a culture of oppression (...)
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