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Summary Søren Aabye Kierkegaard (1813-1855) is generally considered to be the father of existentialism. Kierkegaard’s father, a wealthy retired merchant, was a Pietist and hence encouraged his sons Peter Christian and Søren Aabye to study theology at the University of Copenhagen. Kierkegaard received the degree of Magister Artium in 1840, though by that time his interest has shifted from theology to philosophy. He had hoped to receive an academic position in philosophy, but those hopes were never realized. He was closely tied, however, to academic circles, and was, in fact, one of the leading intellectuals of what has come to be known as the Danish “Golden Age.” Kierkegaard was primarily a polemical writer whose works were often responses to the works of contemporaries such at Hans Lassen Martensen and Johann Ludvig Heiberg. He wrote on a broad range of topics from aesthetics to psychology and employed a variety of literary styles from the novel (e.g. Repetition) to more traditional academic treatises (e.g., The Concept of Anxiety). His mature interest was in delineating the relation between Christianity and philosophy with an emphasis on precisely what was involved both cognitively and practically in being Christian. Kierkegaard is thought by many to have coined the expression “leap of faith.” In fact, this expression comes from Lessing and is used by Kierkegaard only ironically.
Key works The two works most central to Kierkegaard’s thought are Philosophical Crumbs (Kierkegaard & Mooney 2009) and the Concluding Unscientific Postscript to the Philosophical Crumbs (Kierkegaard 2009), though his most famous work is undoubtedly Fear and Trembling (Kierkegaard 1939). Philosophical Crumbs introduces the distinction between what Kierkegaard’s pseudonym Johannes Climacus presents as the traditional philosophical account of the relation of the individual to the truth and the account of this relation given by Christianity. The Postscript looks in detail about what it means to become a Christian. Approximately half of Kierkegaard’s works, including those just mentioned, were published under pseudonyms. Among the works published under Kierkegaard’s own name, the most important are arguably Works of Love (Kierkegaard 1998), and Training in Christianity (Kierkegaard 2004).
Introductions Introductory articles: Michelle Kosch, "Kierkegaard" (Kosch 2015) and Piety, "Kierkegaard on Rationality" (Piety 1993). Book length introductory works: C. Stephen Evans’s Kierkegaard: An Introduction (Evans 2009); Alastair Hannay’s Kierkegaard (Hannay 1982); Gregor Malantschuk’s The Controversial Kierkegaard (Malantschuk 1980), and David F. Swenson’s Something About Kierkegaard (Swenson 1941).
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  1. The Problem of Despair: A Kierkegaardian Reading of the Book of Job.Richard Oxenberg - manuscript
    The Book of Job is often read as the Bible's response to theodicy's 'problem of evil.' As a resolution to the logical difficulties of this problem, however, it is singularly unsatisfying. Job's ethical protest against God is never addressed at the level of the ethical. But suggested in Job's final encounter with God is the possibility of a spiritual resolution beyond the ethical. In this paper I examine the Book of Job as a response to the spiritual problem of despair; (...)
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  2. Faith and sacrifice in Fear and Trembling.Neelesh Pratap - manuscript
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  3. Bakhtin and the Kierkegaardian Revolution.Sergeiy Sandler - manuscript
    Søren Kierkegaard’s influence on the thought of Mikhail Bakhtin has received relatively little attention from Bakhtin scholars (and hardly any attention from Bakhtin scholars in the English-speaking world). Yet, as I argue in this paper, Kierkegaard was among the most important formative influences on Bakhtin's work. This influence is most evident in Bakhtin's early ethical philosophy, but remains highly relevant in later periods. Reading Bakhtin as a follower and developer of Kierkegaard's fundamental philosophical insights provides us with a key to (...)
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  4. The Concept of ‘Subject’ in Søren Kierkegaard’s Philosophy.Türker Armaner - unknown - Yeditepe'de Felsefe (Philosophy at Yeditepe) 2.
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  5. Irony as a Post-Romantic Possibility for Art: Kierkegaard's Reply to Hegel.James Crooks - unknown - Eidos: The Canadian Graduate Journal of Philosophy 3.
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  6. Kierkegaard and the ground of morality.Alison Assiter - forthcoming - Acta Kierkegaardiana.
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  7. Marrying a married man: A postscript.Monique Borgerhoff Mulder - forthcoming - Human Nature: A Critical Reader.
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  8. The Ethics of Neighbor-Love in Kierkegaard and Duns Scotus.Charles Duke - forthcoming - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy.
    John Duns Scotus (1265/6-1308) and Søren Kierkegaard (1813-1855) have much to say regarding the relationship between the commandments to love God and to love one’s neighbor. Their positions are so similar in places that some interpreters have suggested that Kierkegaard and Scotus agree that the command to love one’s neighbor follows necessarily from the command to love God. That is, Scotus and Kierkegaard allegedly hold that the indicative, “One’s neighbor is to be loved” is necessarily true in the same way (...)
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  9. The Curious Case of the Disappearance of Pyrrhonism from Continental Philosophy.Robb Dunphy - forthcoming - International Journal for the Study of Skepticism.
    In this article, evidence is briefly presented for three facts that together point to something puzzling. (1) That major continental philosophers of the nineteenth century tended to engage in some detail, as part of a broader preoccupation with ancient Greek thought, with Pyrrhonian scepticism. (2) That major continental philosophers of the twentieth century tended to engage in some depth with their nineteenth-century forebears and maintained their tendency to engage significantly with ancient Greek thought. (3) That twentieth-century continental philosophers demonstrate little (...)
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  10. Ambiguous and Deeply Differentiated: Kierkegaard's Relations to Hegel1.Ame Gren - forthcoming - Kierkegaardiana.
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  11. The Philosophy of Science in Either-Or.Hans Halvorson - forthcoming - In Ryan Kemp & Walter Wietzke (eds.), Cambridge Critical Guide to Either-Or. Cambridge University Press.
    Kierkegaard's Either-Or is a book about the choice between aesthetic, ethical, and religious approaches to life. I show that Either-Or also contains a proposal for philosophy of science, and in particular, about the ideal epistemic state for human beings. Whereas the Cartesian-Hegelian tradition conceived of the ideal state as one of detached deliberation -- i.e. "seeing the world as it is in itself" -- Kierkegaard envisions the ideal state as the achievement of equilibrium between the "spectator" and "actor" aspects of (...)
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  12. Kierkegaard’s account of thought experiment: a method of variation.Eleanor Helms - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy.
    I argue that Kierkegaard has an account of thought experiment. While his contemporary Ørsted’s contributions to the early history of the concept of ‘thought experiment’ have been recently acknowledged, Kierkegaard’s contributions remain largely unrecognized. I argue that Kierkegaard’s method of ‘imaginary construction’ [Tanke-Experiment] aims at identifying underlying invariants in objects of experience. I outline similarities between Ørsted’s pursuit of invariants in the sciences and Kierkegaard’s fictional variations in Repetition. One implication is that Kierkegaard’s view is more scientific and methodological than (...)
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  13. Kierkegaard’s “Mission Possibility”.Wojciech Kaftanski - forthcoming - Metascience:1-4.
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  14. Kant's and Kierkegaard's conception of ethics' in.Ulrich‘Der Kantianismus Kierkegaard’S. Knappe - forthcoming - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook.
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  15. Either Kierkegaard/Or Nietzsche: Moral Philosophy in a New Key [book review].J. Lippitt - forthcoming - Ars Disputandi: The Online Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
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  16. Indirect Communication by Kierkegaard.Poul Lübcke - forthcoming - Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica.
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  17. JR Dúvida antiga e dúvida moderna segundo Kierkegaard.Maia Neto - forthcoming - Revista Latinoamericana de Filosofia.
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  18. Resolving to Believe: Kierkegaard’s Direct Doxastic Voluntarism.Z. Quanbeck - forthcoming - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
    According to a traditional interpretation of Kierkegaard, he endorses a strong form of direct doxastic voluntarism on which we can, by brute force of will, make a “leap of faith” to believe propositions that we ourselves take to be improbable and absurd. Yet most leading Kierkegaard scholars now wholly reject this reading, instead interpreting Kierkegaard as holding that the will can affect what we believe only indirectly. This paper argues that Kierkegaard does in fact endorse a restricted, sophisticated, and plausible (...)
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  19. Michael Weston, Kierkegaard and Modern Continental Philosophy.J. Ree - forthcoming - Radical Philosophy.
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  20. 'Peter Fenves,Chatter': Language and History in Kierkegaard.J. Ree - forthcoming - Radical Philosophy.
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  21. Soren Kierkegaard newsletter no. 19.Aar Kierkegaard Seminar - forthcoming - Philosophy.
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  22. Form and Faith in Sheridan Hough's "Kierkegaard's Dancing Tax Collector". [REVIEW]Susanna Siegel - forthcoming - Syndicate Philosophy.
    I argue that in Sheridan Hough's book Kierkegaard's Dancing Tax Collector, the distinctive and novelistic literary form is not a playful, whimsical, or otherwise contingent feature, but a structure that's needed to convey the account of Kierkegaardian faith as practical in nature.
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  23. Distinguishing Models of Kierkegaard’s Indirect Communication: Toward a Clearer View of a Multivalent Discourse Technique.Kevin Storer - forthcoming - International Journal of Philosophy.
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  24. Group identity and the willful subversion of rationality: A reply to De Cruz and Levy.Neil Van Leeuwen - forthcoming - Mind and Language.
    De Cruz and Levy, in their commentaries on Religion as Make-Believe, present distinct questions that can be addressed by clarifying one core idea. De Cruz asks whether one can rationally assess the mental state of religious credence that I theorize. Levy asks why we should not explain the data on religious “belief” merely by positing factual beliefs with religious contents, which happen to be rationally acquired through testimony. To both, I say that having religious credences is p-irrational: a purposeful departure (...)
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  25. Soren Kierkegaard Literature 2002-2004 A Bibliography.Julia Watkin, Aage Jorgensen & Noel Stewart Adams - forthcoming - Kierkegaardiana.
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  26. Reason and Conversion in Kierkegaard and the German Idealists.Dan Watts - forthcoming - Tandf: British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-5.
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  27. Kant and Kierkegaard on Faith.Marc Williams - forthcoming - Logos. Anales Del Seminario de Metafísica [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, España].
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  28. The ‘Therapy of Desire’ in Kierkegaard’s Discourse on Lk 22:15.Jeronimo Ayesta - 2024 - Sophia 63 (2):329-343.
    This paper aims to develop the notion of ‘therapy of desire’ as a hermeneutic key for understanding Kierkegaard’s view of desire. First, I develop the notion of ‘therapy of desire’ as it has appeared in the secondary literature on Kierkegaard and Augustine, particularly in Lee C. Barrett. In my reading, I underscore how a ‘therapy of desire’ implies that the desire can be ‘healed’ and that the desirer has ‘agency’ over his/her desires. Second, I conduct a textual analysis of Kierkegaard’s (...)
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  29. Kierkegaard on God's will and human freedom: an upbuilding antinomy.Lee C. Barrett - 2024 - Lanham: Lexington Books.
    This book argues that Kierkegaard, influenced by Kant's critique of metaphysics, did not attempt to integrate human and divine agencies in any speculative theory. Instead, Kierkegaard deploys them to encourage different passions and dispositions that can be integrated in a coherent human life.
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  30. Singularidad individual versus “singularity”. Una crítica al transhumanismo desde el pensamiento de Søren Kierkegaard.Catalina Elena Dobre & Rafael García Pavón - 2024 - Tópicos: Revista de Filosofía 69:389-420.
    Si bien existen algunos intentos de repensar el tema de la tecnología desde la filosofía de Søren Kierkegaard, no existe todavía un diálogo directo con la postura transhumanista. En este artículo proponemos un acercamiento inédito, entendido como una crítica, desde el pensamiento de Kierkegaard al transhumanismo y su concepto de singularity. Primero, analizamos el modo en el que los transhumanistas entienden el concepto de singularity y sus limitaciones; después, apoyándonos en la filosofía de Kierkegaard, defendemos que la única singularidad posible (...)
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  31. Kierkegaard's concept of the interesting: the aesthetic gulf in Either/or I.Anthony Eagan - 2024 - Lanham: Lexington Books.
    The Concept of the Interesting portrays the artistic theories and life-view of Søren Kierkegaard's pseudonymous aesthete, known as A-one of the most intelligent and reflective yet deeply misguided characters in the modern literary tradition-ultimately revealing the flaws in his theory of existence and the new directions his aporia makes possible.
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  32. Thoughts on Reading Kierkegaard in a Pluralist Society.Jürgen Habermas - 2024 - Res Philosophica 101 (2):175-190.
    Soren Kierkegaard’s Lutheran existentialism represents a distinctively postmetaphysical philosophy of religion, focused in particular on a Christian vision of ethical authenticity. His philosophy continues to pose challenging questions for postmetaphysical philosophers in contemporary pluralistic settings. Focusing on specific works of Kierkegaard, this essay develops three such questions: (1) Can philosophy in a postmetaphysical vein still give advice for the pursuit of the good life, today’s diversity of life styles and values notwithstanding? (2) How can a postmetaphysical philosophy relate to the (...)
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  33. A phenomenological account of Kierkegaard's stages.Eleanor Helms - 2024 - In J. Aaron Simmons, Jeffrey Hanson & Wojciech Kaftanski (eds.), Kierkegaardian phenomenologies. Lanham: Lexington Books.
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  34. The problem of existence and the intimacy of being.Joaquim Hernandez-Dispaux - 2024 - In J. Aaron Simmons, Jeffrey Hanson & Wojciech Kaftanski (eds.), Kierkegaardian phenomenologies. Lanham: Lexington Books.
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  35. Heidegger's Alternative History of Time.Emily Hughes & Marilyn Stendera - 2024 - New York: Routledge. Edited by Marilyn Stendera.
    This book reconstructs Heidegger’s philosophy of time by reading his work with and against a series of key interlocutors that he nominates as being central to his own critical history of time. In doing so, it explains what makes time of such significance for Heidegger and argues that Heidegger can contribute to contemporary debates in the philosophy of time. Time is a central concern for Heidegger, yet his thinking on the subject is fragmented, making it difficult to grasp its depth, (...)
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  36. Imagination, Mental Representation, and Moral Agency: Moral Pointers in Kierkegaard and Ricoeur.Wojciech Kaftanski - 2024 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 23 (1):179-198.
    This article engages the considerations of imagination in Kierkegaard and Ricoeur to argue for a moral dimension of the imagination and its objects. Imaginary objects are taken to be mental representations in images and narratives of people or courses of action that are not real in the sense that they are not actual, or have not yet happened. Three claims are made in the article. First, by drawing on the category of possibility, a conceptual distinction is established between imagination and (...)
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  37. Art and praise in Kierkegaard's Works of love.Richard A. McCombs - 2024 - Lanham: Lexington Books.
    With a focus on Works of Love, this book argues that for Kierkegaard the living of the life of faith and love is a kind of art, involving skillful attention to the specificity of the episodes in an individual's life, and the creative imagining of new ways of enacting these virtues.
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  38. Cinematic Time as Spiritual Memory: Tarkovsky and Kierkegaard.Rafael García Pavón - 2024 - In Catalina Elena Dobre, Rafael García Pavón & Francisco Díaz Estrada (eds.), Human Flourishing, Spiritual Awakening and Cultural Renewal: Personal and Communal Challenges. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 35-46.
    Cinematographic art can regenerate the experience of time as a spiritual memory because cinema can simultaneously present the modes of time, separating them from chronology and immediacy, seeing and thinking about the reality of the future of the world and, therefore, the crossroads where the spirit is called to create itself in relation to the way things become, which implies choosing to believe that is possible. The aim of this work is to show how the film concept and style of (...)
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  39. Kierkegaard on belief and credence.Z. Quanbeck - 2024 - European Journal of Philosophy 32 (2):394-412.
    Kierkegaard's pseudonym Johannes Climacus famously defines faith as a risky “venture” that requires “holding fast” to “objective uncertainty.” Yet puzzlingly, he emphasizes that faith requires resolute conviction and certainty. Moreover, Climacus claims that all beliefs about contingent propositions about the external world “exclude doubt” and “nullify uncertainty,” but also that uncertainty is “continually present” in these very same beliefs. This paper argues that these apparent contradictions can be resolved by interpreting Climacus as a belief‐credence dualist. That is, Climacus holds that (...)
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  40. Kierkegaard on the Relationship Between Practical and Epistemic Reasons for Belief.Z. Quanbeck - 2024 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 105 (2):233-266.
    On the dominant contemporary accounts of how practical considerations affect what we ought to believe, practical considerations either encroach on epistemic rationality by affecting whether a belief is epistemically justified, or constitute distinctively practical reasons for belief which can only affect what we ought to believe by conflicting with epistemic rationality. This paper argues that Søren Kierkegaard offers a promising alternative view on which practical considerations can affect what we ought to believe without either encroaching on or (necessarily) conflicting with (...)
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  41. Auto-destrucción y auto-constitución en el pensamiento de Kierkegaard: un análisis de la primera parte de La enfermedad mortal.Pablo Uriel Rodríguez - 2024 - Revista Filosofía Uis 23 (1):26-53.
    El punto de partida de este trabajo es que la idea de autoconservación es constitutiva para la comprensión y el desarrollo histórico de la subjetividad moderna. El análisis kierkegaardiano de la psicología del individuo moderno en La enfermedad mortal retoma y reelabora el tópico de la autoconservación. Anti-Climacus (el pseudónimo kierkegaardiano) sostiene que los seres humanos no están ocupados con el mantenimiento de un yo ya determinado y concluido; sino, más bien, con la constitución misma de ese yo. En su (...)
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  42. The single individual.René Rosfort - 2024 - In J. Aaron Simmons, Jeffrey Hanson & Wojciech Kaftanski (eds.), Kierkegaardian phenomenologies. Lanham: Lexington Books.
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  43. Thankfulness: Kierkegaard’s First-Person Approach to the Problem of Evil.Heiko Schulz - 2024 - Philosophies 9 (2):32.
    The present paper argues that, despite appearance to the contrary, Kierkegaard’s writings offer promising argumentational resources for addressing the problem of evil. According to Kierkegaard, however, in order to make use of these resources at all, one must necessarily be willing to shift the battleground, so to speak: from a third- to a genuine first-person perspective, namely the perspective of what Climacus dubs Religiousness A. All (yet also only) those who seek deliberate self-annihilation before God—a God in relation to whom (...)
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  44. Ignorance, Frailty, and Defiance: The Anxiety of Freedom.Lanxin Shi - 2024 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 29 (1):127-146.
    Interpretations of Vigilius Haufniensis’ analysis of anxiety in the literature can be mainly classified into two models. One holds that anxiety is a phenomenological companion to freedom, whereas the other explains it through the phenomenon of frailty or volitional weakness. Curiously, however, scholars holding one model rarely mention the other. I suggest that this results in a partial understanding of Haufniensis’ concept of anxiety. Building on these two popular models, I argue for a more holistic reading that anxiety is rooted (...)
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  45. Kierkegaardian phenomenologies.J. Aaron Simmons, Jeffrey Hanson & Wojciech Kaftanski (eds.) - 2024 - Lanham: Lexington Books.
    Kierkegaardian Phenomenologies offers a timely consideration of phenomenological engagements within the thought of Søren Kierkegaard. This collection not only reflects the current state of scholarly conversations in Kierkegaardian studies and phenomenological research, but also envisions new directions in which they should go.
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  46. Finitude, Necessity, and Healing from Despair in Kierkegaard's The Lily and the Bird.Anna Louise Strelis Söderquist - 2024 - Journal of Religious Ethics 52 (1):95-113.
    This study underscores The Lily and the Bird's response to despair in The Sickness unto Death. By suggesting in The Lily and the Bird that we look to nature's creatures to learn an attunement and responsiveness to our situation as physical creatures subject to finite constraints, Kierkegaard's text comes into dialogue with a form of misalignment portrayed in The Sickness unto Death as a refusal of the given, “the finite,” and “the necessary.” One way of seeking alignment in The Lily (...)
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  47. Kierkegaard’s Theories of the Stages of Existence and Subjective Truth as a Model for Further Research into the Phenomenology of Religious Attitudes.Andrzej Słowikowski - 2024 - Philosophies 9 (2):35.
    There are many religions in the human world, and people manifest their religiousness in many different ways. The main problem this paper addresses concerns the possibility of sorting out this complex world of human religiousness by showing that it can be phenomenologically reduced to a few very basic existential attitudes. These attitudes express the main types of ways in which a human being relates to his or herself and the world, independently of the worldview or religion professed by the individual. (...)
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  48. Time, Eternity, Freedom in Kierkegaard, Heidegger and Ricoeur.Roberto Tommasi - 2024 - In Ines Testoni, Fabio Scardigli, Andrea Toniolo & Gabriele Gionti S. J. (eds.), Eternity Between Space and Time: From Consciousness to the Cosmos. De Gruyter. pp. 55-66.
  49. Kierkegaard on Politics, written by Stocker, B.Roel Wolters - 2024 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 27 (1):160-163.
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  50. God as Both Hierarchical and Egalitarian: A Kierkegaardian Proposal Based on Philosophical Fragments.Jaeha Woo - 2024 - Toronto Journal of Theology 40 (1):63-73.
    After highlighting Søren Kierkegaard's emphasis on the absolute difference between God and humans, this article presents his explanation of why we can readily embrace our inferior position to God, which appeals to his understanding of love as involving the desire to be the guilty party. But this argument can be turned around to make a case that God would desire to be the guilty party in relation to us. This fits well with the story of God's love in Kierkegaard's pseudonymous (...)
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