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  1. The Debate over Scientific Realism.Chrysovalantis 5. Stergiou - 2013 - In Aristidis Baltas & Kostas Stergiopoulos (eds.), (eds.), Philosophy and Sciences in Twentieth Century. Heraclion:. Crete University Press. pp. 467-498.
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  2. Is There a Valid Experimental Argument for Scientific Realism?Peter Achinstein - 2002 - Journal of Philosophy 99 (9):470.
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  3. Scientific Realism Within Perspectivism and Perspectivism Within Scientific Realism.Evandro Agazzi - 2016 - Axiomathes 26 (4):349-365.
    Perspectivism is often understood as a conception according to which subjective conditions inevitably affect our knowledge and, therefore, we are never confronted with reality and facts but only with interpretations. Hence, subjectivism and anti-realism are usually associated with perspectivism. The thesis of this paper is that, especially in the case of the sciences, perspectivism can be better understood as an appreciation of the cognitive attitude that consists in considering reality only from a certain ‘point of view’, in a way that (...)
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  4. The Basis of Realism.Samuel Alexander - 1914 - [Oxford University Press].
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  5. What's the Point in Scientific Realism If We Don't Know What's Really There?Sophie R. Allen - 2007 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 82 (61):97-123.
    The aim of this paper will be to show that certain strongly realist forms of scientific realism are either misguided or misnamed. I will argue that, in the case of a range of robustly realist formulations of scientific realism, the ‘scientific’ and the ‘realism’ are in significant philosophical and methodological conflict with each other; in particular, that there is a tension between the actual subject matter and methods of science on the one hand, and the realists' metaphysical claims about which (...)
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  6. What's the Point in Scientific Realism If We Don't Know What's Really There?: Sophie R. Allen.Sophie R. Allen - 2007 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 82 (61):97-123.
    The aim of this paper will be to show that certain strongly realist forms of scientific realism are either misguided or misnamed. I will argue that, in the case of a range of robustly realist formulations of scientific realism, the ‘scientific’ and the ‘realism’ are in significant philosophical and methodological conflict with each other; in particular, that there is a tension between the actual subject matter and methods of science on the one hand, and the realists' metaphysical claims about which (...)
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  7. Scientific Realism and Primitive Ontology.Valia Allori - manuscript
    In this paper I wish to connect the recent debate in the philosophy of quantum mechanics concerning the nature of the wave-function to the historical debate in the philosophy of science regarding the tenability of scientific realism. Being realist about quantum mechanics is particularly challenging when focusing on the wave-function. According to the wave-function ontology approach, the wave-function is a concrete physical entity. In contrast, according to an alternative viewpoint, namely the primitive ontology approach, the wave-function does not represent physical (...)
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  8. Scientific Realism and the Rationality of Science. [REVIEW]Chiara Ambrosio - 2009 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 24 (3):368-370.
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  9. Can a Historian of Science Be a Scientific Realist?Theodore Arabatzis - 2001 - Philosophy of Science 68 (S3):S531-S541.
    In this paper I address some of the problems that the historical development of science poses for a realist and discuss whether a realist construal of scientific activity is conducive to historiographical practice. First, I discuss, by means of historical examples, Ian Hacking's defense of entity realism. Second, I try to show, drawing on Kuhn's recent work on incommensurability, that the realism problem is relevant to historiography and that a realist position entails a particular historiographical strategy, which faces problems. Finally, (...)
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  10. Musgrave, Alan, Essays on Realism and Rationalism.D. M. Armstrong - 2003 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81 (4):599.
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  11. Scientific Realism and Antirealism.Iep Author - 2016 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Scientific Realism and Antirealism Debates about scientific realism concern the extent to which we are entitled to hope or believe that science will tell us what the world is really like. Realists tend to be optimistic; antirealists do not. To a first approximation, scientific realism is the view that well-confirmed scientific theories are approximately true; … Continue reading Scientific Realism and Antirealism →.
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  12. Scientific Realism and Primordial Cosmology.Feraz Azhar & Jeremy Butterfield - unknown
    We discuss scientific realism from the perspective of modern cosmology, especially primordial cosmology: i.e. the cosmological investigation of the very early universe. We first state our allegiance to scientific realism, and discuss what insights about it cosmology might yield, as against "just" supplying scientific claims that philosophers can then evaluate. In particular, we discuss: the idea of laws of cosmology, and limitations on ascertaining the global structure of spacetime. Then we review some of what is now known about the early (...)
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  13. Putnam's Progress.Julian Baggini - 2001 - The Philosophers' Magazine 15:43-45.
  14. Five Theses on Instrumental Realism.Davis Baird - 1988 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1988:165 - 173.
    I present five theses to characterize and argue for "Instrumental Realism," a realism wedded to what we do with instruments, and not what our theories say: The Independence Thesis: Questions about realism are independent of questions about meaning. The Intervening Thesis: Our ability to produce consistent effects with our instruments provides one guarantee that we are engaged with the real world. The Historical Thesis: If the descriptions of what we know and do are of something real, then it will be (...)
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  15. Realism and the Aim of Science: From the Postscript to the Logic of Scientific Discovery.Iii Bartley (ed.) - 2015 - Routledge.
    _Realism and the Aim of Science_ is one of the three volumes of Karl Popper’s _Postscript_ to the Logic of scientific Discovery. The _Postscript_ is the culmination of Popper’s work in the philosophy of physics and a new famous attack on subjectivist approaches to philosophy of science. _Realism and the Aim of Science_ is the first volume of the _Postcript_. Popper here formulates and explains his non-justificationist theory of knowledge: science aims at true explanatory theories, yet it can never prove, (...)
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  16. Realism and Social Science.Ted Benton - 1981 - Radical Philosophy 27:13.
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  17. Realism and Complex Entities.George Berger - 1976 - Philosophical Studies 30 (2):95 - 103.
  18. Remarks on Realism.Gustav Bergmann - 1946 - Philosophy of Science 13 (4):261-273.
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  19. Philosophy and Scientific Realism.Roy Bhaskar - 1998 - In Margaret Scotford Archer (ed.), Critical Realism: Essential Readings. Routledge. pp. 16--47.
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  20. Scientific Realism and Human Emancipation.Roy Bhaskar - 1986
    Following on from Roy Bhaskar’s first two books, A Realist Theory of Science and The Possibility of Naturalism, Scientific Realism and Human Emancipation, establishes the conception of social science as explanatory—and thence emancipatory—critique. _Scientific Realism and Human Emancipation_ starts from an assessment of the impasse of contemporary accounts of science as stemming from an incomplete critique of positivism. It then proceeds to a systematic exposition of scientific realism in the form of transcendental realism, highlighting a conception of science as explanatory (...)
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  21. Scientific Realism.Eftichios Bitsakis - 1993 - Science and Society 57 (2):160 - 193.
    The task of the present paper is to formulate the essential arguments for a scientific realism based on science and especially on physics. The first part of the paper constitutes a critical refutation of the doctrine of David Hume and of contemporary antirealism. The thesis concerning the objectivity of nature is founded on arguments deriving from physics, cosmology and physiology. More specifically, modern energetism is refuted on the basis of the relativistic relations among mass, matter and energy. Modern neoplatonism is (...)
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  22. Realism: Deconstructing the Debate.Simon Blackburn - 2002 - Ratio 15 (2):111–133.
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  23. Edward A. MacKinnon , "The Problem of Scientific Realism". [REVIEW]Richard J. Blackwell - 1973 - The Thomist 37 (2):407.
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  24. Realism and the Aim of Science. [REVIEW]David Bloor - 1984 - British Journal for the History of Science 17 (2):217-221.
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  25. Realism Versus Anti-Realism: Philosophical Problem or Scientific Concern?Jesús P. Zamora Bonilla - forthcoming - Synthese:1-17.
    The decision whether to have a realist or an anti-realist attitude towards scientific hypotheses is interpreted in this paper as a choice that scientists themselves have to face in their work as scientists, rather than as a ‘philosophical’ problem. Scientists’ choices between realism and instrumentalism are interpreted in this paper with the help of two different conceptual tools: a deflationary semantics grounded in the inferentialist approach to linguistic practices developed by some authors, and an epistemic utility function that tries to (...)
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  26. Scientific Realism.Richard Boyd - 1984 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy 21 (1&2):767-791.
    (i) Scientific realism is primarily a metaphysical doctrine about the existence and nature of the unobservables of science. (ii) There are good explanationist arguments for realism, most famously that from the success of science, provided abduction is allowed. Abduction seems to be on an equal footing, at least, with other ampliative methods of inference. (iii) We have no reason to believe a doctrine of empirical equivalence that would sustain the underdetermination argument against realism. (iv) The key to defending realism from (...)
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  27. Ontic Realism and Scientific Explanation.Michael Bradie - 1996 - Philosophy of Science 63 (3):321.
    Wesley Salmon defends an ontic realism that distinguishes explanatory from descriptive knowledge. Explanatory knowledge makes appeals to (unobservable) theoretical acausal mechanisms. Salmon presents an argument designed both to legitimize attributing truth values to theoretical claims and to justify treating theoretical claims as descriptions. The argument succeeds but only at the price of calling the distinction between explanation and description into question. Even if Salmon's attempts to distinguish causal mechanisms from other mechanisms are successful, the assumed centrality of the appeal to (...)
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  28. Autonomous Patterns and Scientific Realism.Katherine Brading - 2010 - Philosophy of Science 77 (5):827-839.
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  29. SMART, J. J. C.: "Philosophy and Scientific Realism".M. C. Bradley - 1964 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 42:262.
  30. Truth In Internal Realism.Manuel Bremer - 1999 - In Julian Nida-Rümelin (ed.), Rationality, Realism and Revision.
    This essay deals with the concept of truth in the context of a version of internal realism . In §1 I define some variants of realism using a set of realistic axioms. In §2 I will argue that for semantical reasons we should be realists of some kind. In §3 I plead for an internalistic setting of realism starting from the thesis that truth is, at least, not a non-epistemic concept. We have to bear the consequences of this in form (...)
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  31. Stathis Psillos: Causation and Explanation. [REVIEW]Ingo Brigandt - 2003 - Philosophy of Science 70 (4):844-846.
  32. Realism and Anti-Realism.Stuart Brock & Edwin Mares - 2007 - Routledge.
    There are a bewildering variety of ways the terms "realism" and "anti-realism" have been used in philosophy and furthermore the different uses of these terms are only loosely connected with one another. Rather than give a piecemeal map of this very diverse landscape, the authors focus on what they see as the core concept: realism about a particular domain is the view that there are facts or entities distinctive of that domain, and their existence and nature is in some important (...)
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  33. Scientific Realism.Harold I. Brown - 1988 - International Studies in Philosophy 20 (3):130-131.
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  34. The Abundant World: Paul Feyerabend's Metaphysics of Science.Matthew J. Brown - forthcoming - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A.
    The goal of this paper is to provide an interpretation of Feyerabend's metaphysics of science as found in late works like Conquest of Abundance and Tyranny of Science. Feyerabend's late metaphysics consists of an attempt to criticize and provide a systematic alternative to traditional scientific realism, a package of views he sometimes referred to as “scientific materialism.” Scientific materialism is objectionable not only on metaphysical grounds, nor because it provides a poor ground for understanding science, but because it implies problematic (...)
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  35. Realism and Antirealism in Social Science.Mario Bunge - 1993 - Theory and Decision 35 (3):207-235.
    Up until recently social scientists took it for granted that their task was to account for the social world as objectively as possible: they were realists in practice if not always in their methodological sermons. This situation started to change in the 1960s, when a number of antirealist philosophies made inroads into social studies. -/- This paper examines critically the following kinds of antirealism: subjectivism, conventionalism, fictionism, social constructivism, relativism, and hermeneutics. An attempt is made to show that these philosophies (...)
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  36. Realismus in Duhems Naturgemässer Klassifikation.Alex Burri - 1996 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 27 (2):203 - 213.
    Realism in Duhem's Natural Classification. Pierre Duhem is an outstanding exponent of empiricism. According to the empiricist view scientific laws and theories merely describe formal relations between observable phenomena. Duhems' important notion of natural classification is intended to explain the predictive success of science. I shall argue that it can only be interpreted realistically. Besides the success of science, two further arguments are put forward in favor of realism: (i) the fact that laws of nature are necessary, and (ii) the (...)
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  37. Erkenntnistheoretische Und Ontologische Probleme der Theoretischen Begriffe.Marco Buzzoni - 1997 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 28 (1):19-53.
    Operationalism and theoretical entities. The thesis of the“theory ladenness” of observation leads to an antinomy. In order to solve this antinomy a technical operationalism is sketched, according to which theories should in principle not contain anything that cannot be reduced to technical procedures. This implies the rejection of Quine's underdeterminacy thesis and of many views about the theoretical-observational distinction, e.g. neopositivistic views, van Fraassen's view, Sneed-Stegmüller's view. Then I argue for the following theses: 1. All scientific concepts are theory laden (...)
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  38. Selective Realism in the Philosophy of Physics.Keith Campbell - 1994 - The Monist 77 (1):27-46.
  39. Conceptions of Ether. Studies in the History of Ether Theories.G. N. Cantor & M. J. S. Hodge - 1985 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 36 (1):81-85.
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  40. The Changing Role of Young's Ether.Geoffrey Cantor - 1970 - British Journal for the History of Science 5 (1):44-62.
    This paper sets out to examine the changes which took place in Thomas Young's concepts of the ether between 1799 and 1807. During the earlier part of this period he supposed the ether to consist of mutually repelling subtle particles which are attracted to particles of matter. Hence, he considered that the ether is denser within dense bodies than in rare ones. Furthermore, Young proposed that the ether density does not change abruptly at an interface; instead the denser ether extends (...)
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  41. Realism and the Aim of Science.Nicholas Capaldi - 1985 - Review of Metaphysics 38 (4):900-901.
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  42. La Distinción Teórico/Observacional: ¿Favorece o Perjudica Al Realismo Científico? (Is the Observational/Theoretical Distinction Negative or Favorable for Scientific Realism?).Christián C. Carman - 2005 - Critica 37 (111):83 - 96.
    Laudan denuncia una paradoja que recae sobre el realista científico. Por un lado, necesita la distinción teórico/observacional para definir su posición pero, por otro, la disolución de la distinción favorece su argumentación. En este artículo me propongo mostrar que si dentro de la distinción teórico/observacional se identifican dos dicotomías diferentes --una entre entidades observables y no observables y otra entre términos teóricos y no teóricos--, la paradoja se disuelve, pues para la caracterización del realismo hace falta la distinción entre términos (...)
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  43. Philosophy and Scientific Realism.Charles E. Caton & J. J. C. Smart - 1965 - Philosophical Review 74 (4):537.
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  44. Historical Narrative: A Dispute Between Constructionism and Scientific Realism.Václav Černík & Jozef Viceník - 2009 - Human Affairs 19 (2).
  45. Truth May Not Explain Predictive Success, but Truthlikeness Does.Gustavo Cevolani & Luca Tambolo - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (4):590-593.
    In a recent paper entitled “Truth does not explain predictive success”, Carsten Held argues that the so-called “No-Miracles Argument” for scientific realism is easily refuted when the consequences of the underdetermination of theories by the evidence are taken into account. We contend that the No-Miracles Argument, when it is deployed within the context of sophisticated versions of realism, based on the notion of truthlikeness, survives Held’s criticism unscathed.
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  46. Scientific Realism.Anjan Chakravartty - 2013 - The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  47. Review of Brian Ellis, The Metaphysics of Scientific Realism[REVIEW]Anjan Chakravartty - 2010 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (7).
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  48. The Semantic or Model-Theoretic View of Theories and Scientific Realism.Anjan Chakravartty - 2001 - Synthese 127 (3):325-345.
    The semantic view of theories is one according to which theories are construed as models of their linguistic formulations. The implications of this view for scientific realism have been little discussed. Contrary to the suggestion of various champions of the semantic view, it is argued that this approach does not make support for a plausible scientific realism any less problematic than it might otherwise be. Though a degree of independence of theory from language may ensure safety from pitfalls associated with (...)
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  49. Why Alan Musgrave Should Become an Essentialist.Alan Chalmers - 2006 - In Colin Cheyne & John Worrall (eds.), Rationality and Reality: Conversations with Alan Musgrave. Springer. pp. 165--181.
  50. Is Water H2O? Evidence, Realism and Pluralism.Hasok Chang - 2012 - Boston Studies in the Philosophy and History of Science.
1 — 50 / 229