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  1. Significant Trends in Current Social and Political Philosophy in Canada: Reflections and Observations.Wesley Cragg - unknown - Eidos: The Canadian Graduate Journal of Philosophy 5.
  2. Book Review: John Adams and the Fear of American Oligarchy, by Luke MayvilleJohn Adams and the Fear of American Oligarchy, by MayvilleLuke. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2016. 232 Pp. [REVIEW]Jeremy D. Bailey - forthcoming - Political Theory:009059171772530.
  3. Reflections on the Social Structure in China.Kurt Bloch - forthcoming - Social Research: An International Quarterly.
  4. Feature Article Nations and Empires1.Stephen R. L. Clark - forthcoming - European Journal of Philosophy.
  5. Hate and Racist Speech in the United States. A Critique.Raphael Cohen-Almagor - forthcoming - Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche.
  6. Settling Accounts at the End of History: A Nonideal Approach to State Apologies.Jasper Friedrich - forthcoming - Political Theory:009059172110650.
    What are we to make of the fact that world leaders, such as Canada’s Justin Trudeau, have, within the last few decades, offered official apologies for a whole host of past injustices? Scholars have largely dealt with this phenomenon as a moral question, seeing in these expressions of contrition a radical disruption of contemporary neoliberal individualism, a promise of a more humane world. Focusing on Canadian apology politics, this essay instead proposes a nonideal approach to state apologies, sidestepping questions of (...)
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  7. Review Essay: Rethinking Sovereignty in an Era of Resurgent Nationalism and Populism.Jonathan Havercroft - forthcoming - Political Theory:009059171990022.
  8. Realism in the Ethics of Immigration.James S. Pearson - forthcoming - Philosophy and Social Criticism:019145372210796.
    The ethics of immigration is currently marked by a division between realists and idealists. The idealists generally focus on formulating morally ideal immigration policies. The realists, however, tend to dismiss these ideals as far-fetched and infeasible. In contrast to the idealists, the realists seek to resolve pressing practical issues relating to immigration, principally by advancing what they consider to be actionable policy recommendations. In this article, I take issue with this conception of realism. I begin by surveying the way in (...)
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  9. Puzzling About State Excuses as an Instance of Group Excuses.François Tanguay-Renaud - forthcoming - In R. A. Duff, L. Farmer, S. Marshall & V. Tadros (eds.), The Constitution of the Criminal Law. Oxford University Press.
    Can the state, as opposed to its individual human members in their personal capacity, intelligibly seek to avoid blame for unjustified wrongdoing by invoking excuses (as opposed to justifications)? Insofar as it can, should such claims ever be given moral and legal recognition? While a number of theorists have denied it in passing, the question remains radically underexplored. -/- In this article (in its penultimate draft version), I seek to identify the main metaphysical and moral objections to state excuses, and (...)
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  10. Responding to Historical Injustices: Collective Inheritance and the Moral Irrelevance of Group Identity.Santiago Truccone-Borgogno - forthcoming - European Journal of Political Theory:1-20.
    European Journal of Political Theory, Ahead of Print. I argue that changes in the numerical identity of groups do not necessarily speak in favour of the supersession of some historical injustice. I contend that the correlativity between the perpetrator and the victim of injustices is not broken when the identity of groups changes. I develop this argument by considering indigenous people's claims in Argentina for the injustices suffered during the Conquest of the Desert. I argue that present claimants do not (...)
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  11. Fighting Power with Power: The Administrative State as a Weapon Against Concentrated Private Power.Samuel Bagg - 2021 - Social Philosophy and Policy 38 (1):220-243.
    Contemporary critics of the administrative state are right to highlight the dangers of vesting too much power in a centralized bureaucracy removed from popular oversight and accountability. Too often neglected in this literature, however, are the dangers of vesting too little power in a centralized state, which enables dominant groups to further expand their social and economic advantages through decentralized means. This article seeks to synthesize these concerns, understanding them as reflecting the same underlying danger of state capture. It then (...)
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  12. “Administrative Constitutionalism”: Considering the Role of Agency Decision-Making in American Constitutional Development.David E. Bernstein - 2021 - Social Philosophy and Policy 38 (1):109-129.
    The last decade or so has seen an explosion of scholarship by American law professors on what has become known as administrative constitutionalism. Administrative constitutionalism is a catchphrase for the role of administrative agencies in influencing, creating, and establishing constitutional rules and norms, and governing based on those rules and norms. Though courts traditionally get far more attention in the scholarly literature and the popular imagination, administrative constitutionalism scholars show that administrative agencies have been extremely important participants in American constitutional (...)
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  13. Review of Holly Lawford-Smith's Not In Their Name: Are Citizens Culpable For Their States’ Actions?[REVIEW]Olle Blomberg - 2021 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 18 (5):554-557.
  14. What Liberals Should Tolerate Internationally.Andrew Jason Cohen - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (1):64-86.
    The purpose of this paper is to shed light on what liberal states should tolerate outside their borders. This requires definitions of `liberalism, ́ `toleration, ́ and `state. ́ In the first section of this paper, I briefly indicate how I use those and other terms necessary to the discussion and introduce the normative principle I take liberals to be committed to. In the second section, I continue clearing the path for the rest of my discussion. In the rest of (...)
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  15. Snap Exclusions and the Role of Citizen Participation in Policy-Making.Brian Hutler & Anne Barnhill - 2021 - Social Philosophy and Policy 38 (1):266-288.
    This essay uses a specific example—proposals to exclude sugary drinks from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program —to explore some features of the contemporary U.S. administrative state. Dating back to the Wilsonian origins of the U.S. administrative state there has been uncertainty about whether we can and should separate politics and administration. On the traditional view, the agencies are to be kept separate from politics—technocratic and value-neutral—although they are indirectly accountable to the president and Congress. The SNAP exclusions example shows, however, (...)
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  16. Can a Value-Neutral Liberal State Still Be Tolerant?Michael Kühler - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (1):25-44.
  17. Hume’s Dynamic Coordination and International Law.Carmen E. Pavel - 2021 - Political Theory 49 (2):215-242.
    At the heart of the tension between state autonomy and international law is the question of whether states should willingly restrict their freedom of action for the sake of international security, human rights, trade, communication, and the environment. David Hume offers surprising insights to answer this question. He argues that the same interests in cooperation arise among individuals as well as states and that their interactions should be regulated by the same principles. Drawing on his model of dynamic coordination, I (...)
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  18. Our Digital Future: Is Big Tech Dangerous? (Part One).Ray Scott Percival - 2021 - Conjecture Magazine.
    Is the web out to get us, or is it a force for autonomy and flourishing? Is it another instrument for the governing elite to channel the masses for political or business purposes? Is it a means for our baser nature to entrench everlasting fake news stories, political narratives, and even whole ideologies? -/- In her tome Surveillance Capitalism, Shoshana Zuboff details what she regards as the dangers of losing our freedom, dignity, and democratic control to business by being “conditioned”, (...)
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  19. The Ambiguity of Expertise in the Administrative State.Joseph Postell - 2021 - Social Philosophy and Policy 38 (1):85-108.
    When the modern administrative state emerged in America during the Progressive Era, at the beginning of the twentieth century, it was typically grounded on the premise that administrative officials are experts who should be insulated from politics. This theory, combined with emerging ideas of scientific management, contributed to the intellectual justification for the administrative state. However, progressives never fully reconciled the tension between this theory and the democratic nature of American politics. Because of this ambiguity and tension in the progressives’ (...)
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  20. Political Philosophy Beyond Methodological Nationalism.Alex Sager - 2021 - Philosophy Compass 16 (2):e12726.
    Interdisciplinary work on the nature of borders and society has enriched and complicated our understanding of democracy, community, distributive justice, and migration. It reveals the cognitive bias of methodological nationalism, which has distorted normative political thought on these topics, uncritically and often unconsciously adapting and reifying state‐centered conceptions of territory, space, and community. Under methodological nationalism, state territories demarcate the boundaries of the political; society is conceived as composed of immobile, culturally homogenous citizens, each belonging to one and only one (...)
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  21. Fiscal Equivalence: Principle and Predation in the Public Administration of Justice.Emily C. Skarbek - 2021 - Social Philosophy and Policy 38 (1):244-265.
    Fiscal equivalence in the public administration of justice requires local police and courts to be financed exclusively by the populations that benefit from their services. Within a polycentric framework, broad based taxation to achieve fiscal equivalence is a desirable principle of public finance because it conceptually allows for the provision of justice to be determined by constituent’s preferences, and increases the political accountability of service providers to constituents. However, the overproduction of justice services can readily occur when the benefits of (...)
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  22. Citizenship in Europe: The Main Stages of Development of the Idea and Institution.Krzysztof Trzcinski - 2021 - Studia Europejskie - Studies in European Affairs 25 (1).
    This paper identifies and synthetically demonstrates the most important steps and changes in the evolution of the idea and institution of citizenship in Europe over more than two thousand years. Citizenship is one of the essential categories defining human status. From a historical perspective, the idea of citizenship in Europe is in a state of constant evolution. Therefore, the essence of the institution of citizenship and its acquisition criteria are continually being transformed. Today’s comprehension of citizenship is different from understanding (...)
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  23. Abolishing Asylum and Violating the Human Rights of Refugees. Why is It Tolerated? The Case of Hungary in the EU.Felix Bender - 2020 - In Elżbieta M. Goździak, Izabella Main & Brigitte Suter (eds.), Europe and the Refugee Response. London, UK: Routledge.
    Why are human rights abuses of refugees at the EU’s geographical periphery tolerated by other EU states? This chapter uses the case of Hungary and Germany to explore how the former abolished the institution of asylum, shedding light on the human rights abuses of refugees, and why states such as the latter seem to condone such actions. It argues that core EU member states condone human rights abuses at the geographical periphery of the EU as long as they contribute to (...)
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  24. ‘Success in Britain Comes with an Awful Lot of Small Print’: Greg Rusedski and the Precarious Performance of National Identity.Jack Black, Thomas Fletcher & Robert J. Lake - 2020 - Nations and Nationalism 4 (26):1104-1123.
    Sport continues to be one of the primary means through which notions of Englishness and Britishness are constructed, contested, and resisted. The legacy of the role of sport in the colonial project of the British Empire, combined with more recent connections between sport and far right fascist/nationalist politics, has made the association between Britishness, Englishness, and ethnic identity(ies) particularly intriguing. In this paper, these intersections are explored through British media coverage of the Canadian‐born, British tennis player, Greg Rusedski. This coverage (...)
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  25. On Liberalism’s Religion.Jean L. Cohen - 2020 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 23 (1):48-67.
  26. Mohist Naturalism.Eirik Lang Harris - 2020 - Philosophical Forum 51 (1):17-31.
    In this paper, I wish to examine the plausibility of two distinct but interrelated claims that might arise out of reading the Mozi . First, I want to examine the plausibility of understanding Mohist philosophy as quite naturalistic, notwithstanding the Mozi’s apparent discussion of a Heaven (tian 天) that has desires, likes, and dislikes and ghosts and spirits who do Heaven’s bidding. In this vein, I wonder if the Mohists think that it is simply a fact of the universe that (...)
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  27. Defending Broad Neutrality.Jeffrey W. Howard - 2020 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 23 (1):36-47.
  28. Putting Proximity in its Place.Jakob Huber - 2020 - Contemporary Political Theory 19 (3):341-358.
    Which role can physical proximity play in our thinking about the foundations of political community in a world where, due to political, economic and technological developments, we seem to live side by side with virtually everyone globally? This article interrogates this question in conversation with Kant’s political thought, where proximity makes a prominent appearance both as a foundation of statehood and of cosmopolitan community. I argue that, as a scalar criterion, the idea of proximity cannot serve as a particularisation principle (...)
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  29. Solidarity with Refugees: An Institutional Approach.Clara Sandelind & Luke Ulaş - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy 51 (4):564-582.
  30. Violence and Politeness: From Walter Benjamin's “Critique” to the Streets of Chicago.Kam Shapiro - 2020 - Constellations 27 (3):438-451.
  31. Justice, Community and Globalization: Groundwork to a Communal-Cosmopolitanism.Joshua Anderson - 2019 - New York, NY, USA: Routledge.
    This book takes up the tension between globalization and community in order to articulate a new theory of global justice. Although the process of globalization is not new, its current manifestation and consequences are. At the same time, there is a growing recognition of the importance of community, identity and belonging. These two facts have generally been understood to be fundamentally in tension, both theoretically and descriptively. This book seeks to resolve this tension, and then draw out the implications for (...)
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  32. Legitimate Exclusion of Would-Be Immigrants: A View From Global Ethics and the Ethics of International Relations.Enrique Camacho Beltran - 2019 - Social Sciences 8 (8):238.
    The debate about justice in immigration seems somehow stagnated given that it seems justice requires both further exclusion and more porous borders. In the face of this, I propose to take a step back and to realize that the general problem of borders—to determine what kind of borders liberal democracies ought to have—gives rise to two particular problems: first, to justify exclusive control over the administration of borders (the problem of legitimacy of borders) and, second, to specify how this control (...)
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  33. Book Review: Civil Disobedience, by William Scheuerman. [REVIEW]Maeve Cooke - 2019 - Political Theory 47 (4):589-594.
  34. Firms as Political Entities. Saving Democracy Through Economic Bicameralism.Jean-Philippe Deranty - 2019 - Tandf: Critical Horizons 20 (1):95-98.
    Volume 20, Issue 1, February 2019, Page 95-98.
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  35. Introduction.Ashley Dodsworth & Iseult Honohan - 2019 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-9.
  36. Exile, Statelessness, and Migration: Playing Chess with History From Hannah Arendt to Isaiah Berlin. Seyla Benhabib. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2018.Peter E. Gordon - 2019 - Constellations 26 (4):653-655.
  37. Routledge Handbook of Global Populism. Carlos de la Torre Ed. London and New York: Routledge, 2019.Dirk Jörke - 2019 - Constellations 26 (4):655-658.
  38. Book Review: Future Freedoms: Intergenerational Justice, Democratic Theory, and Ancient Greek Tragedy and Comedy, by Elizabeth K. Markovits. [REVIEW]Demetra Kasimis - 2019 - Political Theory 47 (4):581-585.
  39. Democracy Without Shortcuts.Cristina Lafont - 2019 - Constellations 26 (3):355-360.
  40. Democracy and Territory. A Necessary Link?Anna Meine - 2019 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-24.
  41. Book Review: The Political Thought of America’s Founding Feminists, by Lisa Pace Vetter. [REVIEW]Wynne Walker Moskop - 2019 - Political Theory 47 (2):293-300.
  42. Book Review: American Immanence: Democracy for an Uncertain World by Michael S. Hogue. [REVIEW]Andrew R. Murphy - 2019 - Political Theory 47 (6):899-904.
  43. Book Review: American Mourning: Tragedy, Democracy, Resilience, by Simon Stow. [REVIEW]Heather Pool - 2019 - Political Theory 47 (3):429-434.
  44. Book Review: A Defense of Rule: Origins of Political Thought in Greece and India, by Stuart Gray. [REVIEW]Aakash Singh Rathore - 2019 - Political Theory 47 (2):278-282.
  45. Rights and Territories: A Reply to Nine, Miller, and Stilz.A. J. Simmons - 2019 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 18 (4):viii-xxiii.
    ‘Rights and Territories: A Reply to Nine, Miller, and Stilz’ defends the Lockean theory of states’ territorial rights against the critiques of Nine, Miller, and Stilz. In response to Nine’s concern that such a Lockean theory cannot justify the right of legitimate states to exclude aliens, it is argued that a consent-based theory like the Lockean one is flexible enough to justify a wide range of possible incidents of territorial rights – importantly including, though not necessarily including, the sort of (...)
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  46. Perfectionism: Political Not Metaphysical.Collis Tahzib - 2019 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 47 (2):144-178.
  47. Between Carceral Feminism and Transformative Justice.Anna Terwiel - 2019 - Social Philosophy Today 35:161-165.
  48. Social Freedom and Migration in a Non-Ideal World.Drew Thompson - 2019 - Ethics and Global Politics 12 (4):21-31.
  49. Book Review: An Impossible Dream? Racial Integration in the United States, by Sharon A. Stanley. [REVIEW]Inés Valdez - 2019 - Political Theory 47 (4):594-598.
  50. Responsible Parties: Saving Democracy From Itself. Frances McCall Rosenbluth and Ian Shapiro. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2018. [REVIEW]Fabio Wolkenstein - 2019 - Constellations 26 (4):658-660.
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