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  1. Rational Impressions and the Stoic Philosophy of Mind.Vanessa de Harven - forthcoming - In John Sisko (ed.), History of Philosophy of Mind: Pre-Socratics to Augustine. Acumen Publishing.
    This paper seeks to elucidate the distinctive nature of the rational impression on its own terms, asking precisely what it means for the Stoics to define logikē phantasia as an impression whose content is expressible in language. I argue first that impression, generically, is direct and reflexive awareness of the world, the way animals get information about their surroundings. Then, that the rational impression, specifically, is inherently conceptual, inferential, and linguistic, i.e. thick with propositional content, the way humans receive incoming (...)
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  2. The Stoic Appeal to Expertise: Platonic Echoes in the Reply to Indistinguishability.Simon Shogry - 2021 - Apeiron 54 (2):129-159.
    One Stoic response to the skeptical indistinguishability argument is that it fails to account for expertise: the Stoics allow that while two similar objects create indistinguishable appearances in the amateur, this is not true of the expert, whose appearances succeed in discriminating the pair. This paper re-examines the motivations for this Stoic response, and argues that it reveals the Stoic claim that, in generating a kataleptic appearance, the perceiver’s mind is active, insofar as it applies concepts matching the perceptual stimulus. (...)
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  3. Demonstration and the Indemonstrability of the Stoic Indemonstrables.Susanne Bobzien - 2020 - Phronesis 65 (3):355-378.
    Since Mates’ seminal Stoic Logic there has been uncertainty and debate about how to treat the term anapodeiktos when used of Stoic syllogisms. This paper argues that the customary translation of anapodeiktos by ‘indemonstrable’ is accurate, and it explains why this is so. At the heart of the explanation is an argument that, contrary to what is commonly assumed, indemonstrability is rooted in the generic account of the Stoic epistemic notion of demonstration. Some minor insights into Stoic logic ensue.
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  4. Arcesilaus and the Ontology of Stoic Cognition.Charles E. Snyder - 2020 - Review of Metaphysics 73 (March):455-493.
    The focus of this paper is the dispute between the Academic Arcesilaus of Pitane (ca. 316–240 BC) and the philosophy of Zeno of Citium. Scholars typically claim that Arcesilaus set out to attack Zeno’s epistemology or theory of knowledge. The framework of epistemology prevails in the modern reconstruction of Arcesilaus’s arguments. Proponents of this framework usually contend that the epistemic possibility of Stoic “cognition” or “apprehension” (κατάληψις) is the principal aim of Arcesilaus’s attack. The aim of this article is to (...)
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  5. What Do Our Impressions Say? The Stoic Theory of Perceptual Content and Belief Formation.Simon Shogry - 2019 - Apeiron 52 (1):29-63.
    Here I propose an interpretation of the ancient Stoic psychological theory on which (i) the concepts that an adult human possesses affect the content of the perceptual impressions (φαντασίαι αἰσθητικαί) she forms, and (ii) the content of such impressions is exhausted by an ‘assertible’ (ἀξίωμα) of suitable complexity. What leads the Stoics to accept (i) and (ii), I argue, is their theory of assent and belief formation, which requires that the perceptual impression communicate information suitable to serve as the content (...)
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  6. Creating a Mind Fit for Truth.Simon Shogry - 2018 - Ancient Philosophy 38 (2):357-381.
    This paper offers a new defense of the externalist interpretation of the kataleptic impression. My strategy is to situate the kataleptic impression within the larger context of the Stoic account of expertise. I argue that, given mastery in recognizing the limitations of her own state of mind, the subject can restrict her assent to kataleptic impressions, even if they are phenomenologically indistinguishable from those which are not kataleptic.
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  7. The Stoics on Identity, Identification, and Peculiar Qualities.Tamer Nawar - 2017 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 32 (1):113-159.
    In this paper, I clarify some central aspects of Stoic thought concerning identity, identification, and so-called peculiar qualities (qualities which were seemingly meant to ground an individual’s identity and enable identification). I offer a precise account of Stoic theses concerning the identity and discernibility of individuals and carefully examine the evidence concerning the function and nature of peculiar qualities. I argue that the leading proposal concerning the nature of peculiar qualities, put forward by Eric Lewis, faces a number of objections, (...)
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  8. The Legend of the Justified True Belief Analysis.Julien Dutant - 2015 - Philosophical Perspectives 29 (1):95-145.
    There is a traditional conception of knowledge but it is not the Justified True Belief analysis Gettier attacked. On the traditional view, knowledge consists in having a belief that bears a discernible mark of truth. A mark of truth is a truth-entailing property: a property that only true beliefs can have. It is discernible if one can always tell that a belief has it, that is, a sufficiently attentive subject believes that a belief has it if and only if it (...)
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  9. The Stoic Account of Apprehension.Tamer Nawar - 2014 - Philosophers' Imprint 14:1-21.
    This paper examines the Stoic account of apprehension (κατάληψις) (a cognitive achievement similar to how we typically view knowledge). Following a seminal article by Michael Frede (1983), it is widely thought that the Stoics maintained a purely externalist causal account of apprehension wherein one may apprehend only if one stands in an appropriate causal relation to the object apprehended. An important but unanswered challenge to this view has been offered by David Sedley (2002) who offers reasons to suppose that the (...)
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  10. Perception, Sensibility, and Moral Motivation in Augustine: A Stoic-Platonic Synthesis.Sarah Catherine Byers - 2013 - Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
    This book argues that Augustine assimilated the Stoic theory of perception and mental language (lekta/dicibilia), and that this epistemology underlies his accounts of motivation, affectivity, therapy for the passions, and moral progress. Byers elucidates seminal passages which have long puzzled commentators, such as Confessions 8, City of God 9 and 14, Replies to Simplicianus 1, and obscure sections of the later ‘anti-Pelagian’ works. Tracking the Stoic terminology, Byers analyzes Augustine’s engagement with Cicero, Seneca, Ambrose, Jerome, Origen, and Philo of Alexandria, (...)
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  11. From Skepticism to Paralysis: The Apraxia Argument in Cicero’s Academica.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):369-392.
    This paper analyzes the apraxia argument in Cicero’s Academica. It proposes that the argument assumes two modes: the evidential mode maintains that skepticism is false, while the pragmatic claims that it is disadvantageous. The paper then develops a tension between the two modes, and concludes by exploring some differences between ancient and contemporary skepticism.
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  12. How Boots Befooled the King: Wisdom, Truth, and the Stoics.Sarah Wright - 2012 - Acta Analytica 27 (2):113-126.
    Abstract Can the wise person be fooled? The Stoics take a very strong view on this question, holding that the wise person (or sage) is never deceived and never believes anything that is false. This seems to be an implausibly strong claim, but it follows directly from some basic tenets of the Stoic cognitive and psychological world-view. In developing an account of what wisdom really requires, I will explore the tenets of the Stoic view that lead to this infallibilism about (...)
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  13. Prolepsis and Ennoia in the Early Stoa.Henry Dyson - 2009 - De Gruyter.
    This book offers a reconstruction of the early Stoic doctrine of prolepsis, revealing it to be much closer to Platonic recollection in certain respects than ...
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  14. Ricardo Salles: Los estoicos y el problema de la libertad, México: UNAM 2006, 192pp. [REVIEW]Daniel Vázquez - 2007 - Tópicos: Revista de Filosofía 32:229-235.
  15. Socrates in the Stoa.Eric Brown - 2006 - In Sara Ahbel-Rappe & Rachana Kamtekar (eds.), A Companion to Socrates. Oxford, UK: pp. 275-284.
  16. Living in Doubt: Carneades' Pithanon Reconsidered.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2006 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 31:243-80.
    In this paper, I argue that Carneades' pithanon should be understood as what is probably, though not certainly, true. In this, I oppose, e.g., Burnyeat and Frede, who argue that the pithanon should be understood as the persuasive, and not tied to notions of evidential support. There is a free pdf of this paper available on the OSAP website; see the link below.
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  17. Seneca and the Stoic Theory of Cognition -- Some Preliminary Remarks.Jula Wildberger - 2006 - In Katharina Volk & Gareth Williams (eds.), Seeing Seneca Whole: Perspectives on Philosophy, Poetry, and Politics. Leiden: Brill. pp. 75-102.
    Looks at evidence for Seneca's reception of Stoic epistemology and argues that such knowledge was a factor in determining his style of writing and didactic methods.
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  18. Ignorance and Opinion in Stoic Epistemology.Constance Meinwald - 2005 - Phronesis 50 (3):215-231.
    This paper argues for a view that maximizes in the Stoics' epistemology the starkness and clarity characteristic of other parts of their philosophy. I reconsider our evidence concerning doxa (opinion/belief): should we really take the Stoics to define it as assent to the incognitive, so that it does not include the assent of ordinary people to their kataleptic impressions, and is thus actually inferior to agnoia (ignorance)? I argue against this, and for the simple view that in Stoicism assent is (...)
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  19. Stoic Epistemology and the Limits of Externalism.Casey Perin - 2005 - Ancient Philosophy 25 (2):383-401.
  20. Prolepsis and Koine Ennoia in the Early Stoa.Henry Dyson - 2004 - Dissertation, Emory University
    The Roman Stoics hold that all humans possess the seeds of virtue and wisdom and innately develop certain natural concepts alternately called ' prolepseis,' 'koinai ennoiai,' or 'phusikai ennoiai.' This dissertation addresses the relation between these doctrines, concept-formation, and intellectualist psychology in the Early Stoa. The prevailing view is that the 'empiricism' of the Early Stoa precludes interpreting prolepsis and koine ennoia as tacitly functioning innate ideas; rather, the Roman Stoics are influenced by Platonic recollection. I argue to the contrary (...)
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  21. The Stoic Theory of Implanted Preconceptions.Matt Jackson-McCabe - 2004 - Phronesis 49 (4):323-347.
    A number of late Stoic sources describe either ethical concepts or a supposed universal belief in gods as being innate in the human animal. Though Chrysippus himself is known to have spoken of "implanted preconceptions" (ἔμφυτοι προλήψεις) of good and bad, scholars have typically argued that the notion of innate concepts of any kind would have been entirely incompatible with his theory of knowledge. Both Epictetus' notion of innate concepts of good and bad and the references to an innate belief (...)
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  22. Propositional Perception: Phantasia, Predication and Sign in Plato, Aristotle and the Stoics, by Jeffrey Barnouw. [REVIEW]Michael B. Papazian - 2004 - Ancient Philosophy 24 (1):235-238.
  23. Augustine and the Cognitive Cause of Stoic Preliminary Passions ( Propatheiai ).Sarah C. Byers - 2003 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (4):433-448.
  24. Propositional Perception: Phantasia, Predication and Sign in Plato, Aristotle and the Stoics.Jeffrey Barnouw - 2002 - University Press of America.
    The early Greek Stoics were the first philosophers to recognize the object of normal human perception as predicative or propositional in nature. Fundamentally we do not perceive qualities or things, but situations and things happening, facts. To mark their difference from Plato and Aristotle, the Stoics adopted phantasia as their word for perception.
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  25. Content, Cause, and Stoic Impressions.Glenn Lesses - 1998 - Phronesis 43 (1):1-25.
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  26. Recollection and Experience: Plato’s Theory of Learning and its Successors. [REVIEW]David Glidden - 1997 - Ancient Philosophy 17 (2):462-469.
  27. Reasonable Impressions in Stoicism.Tad Brennan - 1996 - Phronesis 41 (3):318-334.
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  28. The Stoics on Ambiguity. [REVIEW]David Blank & Catherine Atherton - 1995 - Philosophical Review 104 (2):267.
  29. "Opinione E Scienza: II Dibattito Tra Stoici E Accademici Nel III E Nel II Secolo A.C.", by Anna Maria Ioppolo. [REVIEW]David Konstan - 1992 - Ancient Philosophy 12 (1):219.
  30. Presentation and Assent: A Physical and Cognitive Problem in Early Stoicism.Anna-Maria Ioppolo - 1990 - Classical Quarterly 40 (02):433-.
    The Stoic theory of knowledge was founded by Zeno on a perceptual and crudely materialistic base, but subsequently developed into an elaborate theory involving λεκτ which has proved difficult to reconstruct. The evolution of the school, influenced not only by internal differences but also by interaction with the Platonic Academy, certainly contributed to this development. Hence any adequate reconstruction of the Stoic theory of knowledge must take account of the differences among the positions of the different representatives of the school (...)
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  31. Perceptual Content in the Stoics.Richard Sorabji - 1990 - Phronesis 35 (1):307-314.
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  32. Peripatetic and Stoic Epistemology in Boethus and Antiochus.Harold Tarrant - 1987 - Apeiron 20 (1):17 - 37.
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  33. Aristotelian Perception and the Hellenistic Problem of Representation.David Glidden - 1984 - Ancient Philosophy 4 (2):119-131.
    The understanding of perception advanced by Aristotle and Theophrastus is largely physiological in character, describing the mechanism of perception and its resulting epistemic value. Like Epicurean views, theirs is not a theory of sensory ideas. The Stoics develop a competing approach to perception that describes sensory phenomena in terms of conceptual, linguistic representations.
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  34. Schofield, Malcolm, Myles Burnyeat and Jonathan Barnes "Doubt and Dogmatism: Studies in Hellenistic Epistemology". [REVIEW]William Charlton - 1981 - Philosophy 56:275.
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  35. Doubt and Dogmatism: Studies in Hellenistic Epistemology.Malcolm Schofield, Myles Burnyeat & Jonathan Barnes (eds.) - 1979 - Oxford University Press.
    THE PROTAGONISTS David Sedley The primary object of this historical introduction1 is to enable a reader encountering Hellenistic philosophy for the first ...
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  36. The Stoic Theory of Knowledge.Gerard Watson - 1966 - Belfast, Queen's University.
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