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  1. Eros in Government: Zeno and the Virtuous City.George Boys-Stones - 1998 - Classical Quarterly 48 (01):168-.
    According to a report in Athenaeus , the qualities of Erosled the Stoic Zeno to make him the tutelary god of his ideal state:Pontianus said that Zeno of Citium took Eros to be the god of love and freedom, and even the provider of concord, but nothing else. This is why he said in his Republic that Eros was the god who contributed to the safety of the city.
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  2. Advising the Cosmopolis.Eric Brown - manuscript
    Plutarch charges that Stoic theory is inconsistent with Stoic political engagement no matter what they decide to do, because the Stoics' endorsement of the political life is inconsistent with their cosmopolitan rejection of ordinary politics (Stoic.rep., ab init.). Drawing on evidence from Chrysippus and Seneca, I develop an argument that answers this charge, and I draw out two interesting implications of the argument. The first implication is for scholars of ancient Stoicism who like to say that Stoicism is apolitical. The (...)
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  3. The Stoic Invention of Cosmopolitan Politics.Eric Brown - 2010 - In Matthias Lutz-Bachmann, Andreas Niederberger & Philipp Schink (eds.), Kosmopolitanismus: Zur Geschichte und Zukunft eines umstrittenen Ideals. Weilerswist, Germany: pp. 9-24.
    This lecture explores the political import of Chrysippus' account of why and how one should live as a citizen of the cosmos, and it makes a case for seeing this account as the invention of political cosmopolitanism. (The version uploaded here is the final English draft on which the German translation was based.).
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  4. Contemplative Withdrawal in the Hellenistic Age.Eric Brown - 2008 - Philosophical Studies 137 (1):79-89.
    I reject the traditional picture of philosophical withdrawal in the Hellenistic Age by showing how both Epicureans and Stoics oppose, in different ways, the Platonic and Aristotelian assumption that contemplative activity is the greatest good for a human being. Chrysippus the Stoic agrees with Plato and Aristotle that the greatest good for a human being is virtuous activity, but he denies that contemplation exercises virtue. Epicurus more thoroughly rejects the assumption that the greatest good for a human being is virtuous (...)
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  5. False Idles: The Politics of the "Quiet Life".Eric Brown - 2008 - In Ryan Balot (ed.), A Companion to Greek and Roman Political Thought. Oxford, UK: pp. 485-500.
    The dominant Greek and Roman ideology held that the best human life required engaging in politics, on the grounds that the human good is shared, not private, and that the activities central to this shared good are those of traditional politics. This chapter surveys three ways in which philosophers challenged this ideology, defended a withdrawal from or transformation of traditional politics, and thus rethought what politics could be. Plato and Aristotle accept the ideology's two central commitments but insist that a (...)
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  6. Socrates in the Stoa.Eric Brown - 2006 - In Sara Ahbel-Rappe & Rachana Kamtekar (eds.), A Companion to Socrates. Oxford, UK: pp. 275-284.
  7. Stoic Political Philosophy Andrew Erskine: The Hellenistic Stoa: Political Thought and Action. Pp. Xii + 233. London: Duckworth, 1990. £29.95. [REVIEW]Paul Cartledge - 1991 - The Classical Review 41 (01):105-106.
  8. Stoic Realpolitik.Firmin DeBranander - 2006 - International Philosophical Quarterly 46 (3):277-292.
    Thanks to its doctrines of natural right and moral egalitarianism and to its prominent historical role in defying totalitarian government, Stoicism is often cited as a touchstone for liberal democracy. Less well known, however, is an alternate lineage, culminating in a Stoic Realpolitik that emerges in Justus Lipsius’s political writings. The foundation of this Realpolitik becomes increasingly clear in the progression of Stoic thought through Seneca, Epictetus, and Marcus Aurelius. Tracing this lineage reveals that the subject of politics isfundamentally problematic (...)
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  9. Shorter Note. On the Interpretation of Cicero, De Republica.A. Dyck - 1998 - Classical Quarterly 48 (2):564-568.
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  10. On the Interpretation of Cicero, De Republica.Andrew R. Dyck - 1998 - Classical Quarterly 48 (02):564-.
    Apropos congregatio Zetzel remarks ‘the metaphor is qualified by quasi…, as it more properly refers to animals rather than men’. It seems doubtful, however, that in general the -grego compounds were at this date felt as vividly metaphorical: segrego is used of human beings as early as Plautus and Terence ; aggrego is commonly so used by Cicero . Moreover, our passage is the first attestation of congregatio. Cicero uses the word three times in De Finibus , of which the (...)
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  11. The Stoic Polis Malcolm Schofield: The Stoic Idea of the City. Pp. Xii + 164. Cambridge University Press, 1991. £27.95.Andrew Erskine - 1993 - The Classical Review 43 (01):92-93.
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  12. Conflict and Cosmopolitanism in Plato and the Stoics.Owen Goldin - 2011 - Apeiron 44 (3):264-286.
  13. Margaret E. Reesor: The Political Theory of the Old and Middle Stoa. Pp. X + 60. New York: J. J. Augustin, 1951. Paper.G. B. Kerferd - 1953 - The Classical Review 3 (3-4):197-198.
  14. The Stoic Idea of the City.André Laks - 1994 - Ancient Philosophy 14 (2):452-460.
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  15. Stoic Communitarianism and Normative Citizenship.Anthony A. Long - 2007 - Social Philosophy and Policy 24 (2):241-261.
    This essay argues that Stoicism is the ancient philosophy most relevant to modern politics and civic education. Its relevance is due not to the advocacy of any specific political system or public policy but to its theory that the human good depends primarily on rationality and excellence of character rather than on material prosperity and productivity. According to Stoicism, all human beings are related to one another in virtue of our communal nature as rational animals. Reflection on the norms of (...)
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  16. The Stoic Origin of Natural Rights.Phillip Mitsis - 2006 - Philosophical Inquiry 28 (1-2):159-178.
  17. The Stoics on Property and Politics.Phillip Mitsis - 2005 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 43 (S1):230-249.
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  18. The Stoics and Aquinas on Virtue and Natural Law.Phillip Mitsis - 2003 - In David T. Runia, Gregory E. Sterling & Hindy Najman (eds.), The Studia Philonica Annual. Brown University. pp. 35-63.
  19. Kant and Stoic Cosmopolitanism.Martha C. Nussbaum - 1997 - Journal of Political Philosophy 5 (1):1–25.
  20. Laurand (V.) La Politique stoïcienne. Pp. 153. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 2005. Paper, ???17. ISBN: 978-2-13-054150-. [REVIEW]Malcolm Schofield - 2007 - The Classical Review 57 (01):248-.
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  21. The Stoic Idea of the City.Malcolm Schofield - 1991 - University of Chicago Press.
    The Stoic Idea of the City offers the first systematic analysis of the Stoic school, concentrating on Zeno's Republic . Renowned classical scholar Malcolm Schofield brings together scattered and underused textual evidence, examining the Stoic ideals that initiated the natural law tradition of Western political thought. A new foreword by Martha Nussbaum and a new epilogue written by the author further secure this text as the standard work on Presocratic Stoics. "The account emerges from a jigsaw-puzzle of items from a (...)
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  22. Stoic Cosmopolitanism and Zeno's Republic.John Sellars - 2007 - History of Political Thought 28 (1):1-29.
    Modern accounts of Stoic politics have attributed to Zeno the ideal of an isolated community of sages and to later Stoics such as Seneca a cosmopolitan utopia transcending all traditional States. By returning to the Cynic background to both Zeno's Republic and the Cosmopolitan tradition, this paper argues that the distance between the two is not as great as is often supposed. This account, it is argued, is more plausible than trying to offer a developmental explanation of the supposed transformation (...)
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  23. Law, Reason, and the Cosmic City: Political Philosophy in the Early Stoa.Katja Maria Vogt - 2008 - Oup Usa.
    This book argues that political philosophy is central to early Stoic philosophy, and is deeply tied to the Stoics' conceptions of reason and wisdom. Broad in scope, it explores the Stoics' idea of the cosmic city, their notion of citizen-gods, as well as their account of the law.
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  24. The Stoic Idea of the City.Stephen A. White - 1993 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 31 (3):458-460.
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  25. The Stoics and the State: Theory – Practice – Context.Jula Wildberger - 2018 - Baden-Baden, Deutschland: Nomos.
    How did the Stoics conceive of a polis and statehood? What happens when these ideas meet different biographies and changing historical environments? To answer these questions, 'The Stoics and the State' combines close philological reading of original source texts and fine-grained conceptual analysis with wide-ranging contextualisation, which is both thematic and diachronic. A systematic account elucidates extant definitions, aspects of statehood (territory, institutions, population and state objectives) and the constitutive function of the common law. The book’s diachronic part investigates how (...)
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  26. Senecan Progressor Friendship and the Characterization of Nero in Tacitus' Annals.Jula Wildberger - 2015 - In Christoph Kugelmeier (ed.), Translatio humanitatis: Festschrift zum 60. Geburtstag von Peter Riemer. Sankt Ingbert: Röhrig Universitätsverlag. pp. 471-492.
    Argues that Tacitus’ shaped his account of Seneca and the characterization of Nero within his social environment according to features characteristic of Seneca’s conception of friendship. Surprisingly, Tacitus assigns to Nero an active power: The emperor drives a ubiquitous inversion of the social values promoted by his mentor. Patterns of Seneca’s social thought are adduced to characterize not only the portrayed emperor but also the political institution itself.
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  27. Review of Giovanni Zago. Sapienza Filosofica E Cultura Materiale: Posidonio E le Altre Fonti Dell’ Epistola 90 di Seneca. Bologna: Società Editrice Il Mulino, 2012. [REVIEW]Jula Wildberger - 2014 - Gnomon 86:119-123.
    Seneca's 90th Epistula moralis is one of the very few Stoic accounts of the origin of political bodies. Seneca references Posidonius and probably draws on earlier Stoic material too. The review summarizes and discusses Zago's important contribution to the question of sources for this letter.
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  28. Senea. De ira / Über die Wut, lateinisch und deutsch.Jula Wildberger - 2007 - Stuttgart, Deutschland: Reclam.
    Bilingual edition with German translation, introduction, and notes.
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