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Summary The ancient Stoics divided their own philosophical system into three areas: logic, physics, and ethics. Those divisions do not always map neatly onto modern divisions of the subject. The inter-related nature of the Stoic system can also make classification sometimes appear arbitrary. In the subdivision here epistemology is separated from logic, and political philosophy is separated from ethics. General studies, including studies of the Stoic system itself and Stoic metaphilosophy are grouped under 'Stoics: Misc'.
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  1. Stertinian Rhetoric: Pre-Imperial Stoic Theory and Practice of Public Discourse.Jula Wildberger - 2013 - In Kathryn Tempest & Christos Kremmydas (eds.), Hellenistic Oratory: Continuity and Change. New York; Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 249-276.
    According to an ancient stereotype, prominent in Cicero’s writings, Stoics hated rhetoric and were really bad it. But Horaces’ Satires are populated with lecturing Stoics using colorful, effusive language to cure their audience. The paper asks how “rhetorical” Stoics really were and argues that there was a continued tradition of Stoic rhetoric linking the diatribic speech of the Imperial period to its Hellenistic practitioners. It surveys the evidence for Stoic orators and rhetorical writers in the Hellenistic period and presents evidence (...)
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  2. Был ли бог стоиков личностью? (Was the Stoic God a Person?).Pavel Butakov - 2017 - Schole 11 (2):558-569.
    Peter Forrest claims that his “Personal Pantheist” conception of God is in agreement with the Stoic pantheism. The traditional interpretation, however, treats the Stoic God as the non-personal universal law. I demonstrate that arguments in favor of the personal interpretation typically imply either a personalist or an anthropocentric metaphysical foundation. I also argue that the Stoics were neither personalists nor anthropocentrists, therefore those arguments should be rejected.
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  3. Strategies of Argument: Essays in Ancient Ethics, Epistemology, and Logic.Mi-Kyoung Lee (ed.) - 2014 - NY: Oxford University Press.
    This volume features new papers by an international group of scholars in ancient philosophy, with a particular focus on new work in ancient Greek and Roman ethics, epistemology, logic, and science.
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  4. Magnitudo Animi and Cosmic Politics in Cicero's De Re Publica.Sean McConnell - 2017 - Classical Journal 113:45-70.
    his paper offers a fresh interpretation of the role played by the Dream of Scipio in Cicero’s De re publica. It explores Cicero’s key distinction between the cosmic and the local levels of statesmanship and the problems he sees with localism, and it details fully for the first time the importance that Cicero attached to the virtue of magnitudo animi (“greatness of soul”). The paper makes the case that in De re publica Cicero promotes his own innovative cosmic model of (...)
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  5. Mark Morford, "Stoics and Neostoics: Rubens and the Circle of Lipsius". [REVIEW]Michael L. Morgan - 1993 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 31 (2):288.
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  6. Anthony J. Parel, "The Machiavellian Cosmos". [REVIEW]Ronald G. Witt - 1993 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 31 (3):464.
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  7. "Cicero On Stoic Good and Evil: De Finibus 3 and Paradoxa a Stoicorum", Edited with Introduction, Translation, and Commentary by M.R. Wright. [REVIEW]Paul MacKendrick - 1994 - Ancient Philosophy 14 (2):463.
  8. Zeno of Citium and Stoic Cosmology: Some Notes and Two Case Studies.Keimpe Agra - 2003 - Elenchos 24 (1):9-32.
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  9. Two Studies in Greek Philosophy. [REVIEW]G. B. Kerferd - 1963 - The Classical Review 13 (2):192-193.
  10. The ’Hellenistic’ Philosophers: Schools, Systems, and Sceptics. [REVIEW]Diskin Clay - 1993 - Ancient Philosophy 13 (2):379-393.
  11. The Stoic Theory of Ethical Development:In What Sense is Nature a Norm?Christopher Gill - 2004 - In Matthias Lutz-Bachmann & Jan Szaif (eds.), Was Ist Das Für den Menschen Gute? / What is Good for a Human Being?: Menschliche Natur Und Güterlehre / Human Nature and Values. Walter de Gruyter. pp. 101-125.
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  12. "It is the Spirit That Gives Life": A Stoic Understanding of Pneuma in John's Gospel.Gitte Buch-Hansen - 2010 - De Gruyter.
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  13. Galen and the Stoics: What Each Could Learn From the Other About Embodied Psychology.Burkhard Reis & Dorothea Frede - 2009 - In Burkhard Reis & Dorothea Frede (eds.), Body and Soul in Ancient Philosophy. Walter de Gruyter.
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  14. Stoic Souls in Stoic Corpses.Burkhard Reis & Dorothea Frede - 2009 - In Burkhard Reis & Dorothea Frede (eds.), Body and Soul in Ancient Philosophy. Walter de Gruyter.
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  15. Transgressions Are Equal, and Right Actions Are Equal: Some Philosophical Reflections on Paradox III in Cicero’s Paradoxa Stoicorum.Daniel Rönnedal - 2017 - Philosophia 45 (1):317-334.
    In Paradoxa Stoicorum, the Roman philosopher Cicero defends six important Stoic theses. Since these theses seem counterintuitive, and it is not likely that the average person would agree with them, they were generally called "paradoxes". According to the third paradox, (P3), (all) transgressions (wrong actions) are equal and (all) right actions are equal. According to one interpretation of this principle, which I will call (P3′), it means that if it is forbidden that A and it is forbidden that B, then (...)
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  16. Sociable and Self-Sufficient: The Stoic Theory of Friendship.Kat Gilchrist - unknown
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  17. The Stoic Idea of the City.Troels Engberg-Pedersen & Malcolm Schofield - 1993 - Philosophical Review 102 (4):586.
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  18. Ethics and Human Action in Early Stoicism.Troels Engberg-Pedersen - 1988 - Philosophical Review 97 (2):252.
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  19. Physics of the Stoics.P. Diamadopoulos - 1961 - Philosophical Review 70 (2):257.
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  20. Cotidie Meditare. Theory and Practice of the Meditatio in Imperial Stoicism.Robert J. Newman - 1987 - In Wolfgang Haase (ed.), Philosophie, Wissenschaften, Technik. Philosophie. De Gruyter. pp. 1473-1517.
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  21. Cornutus and Stoic Allegoresis: A Preliminary Report.Glenn W. Most - 1987 - In Wolfgang Haase (ed.), Philosophie, Wissenschaften, Technik. Philosophie. De Gruyter. pp. 2014-2066.
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  22. Stoic Cosmology and Roman Literature, First to Third Centuries A.D.Michael Lapidge - 1987 - In Wolfgang Haase (ed.), Philosophie, Wissenschaften, Technik. Philosophie. De Gruyter. pp. 1379-1429.
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  23. Language and Learning: Philosophy of Language in the Hellenistic Age.Dorothea Frede & Brad Inwood (eds.) - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
    The philosophers and scholars of the Hellenistic world laid the foundations upon which the Western tradition based analytical grammar, linguistics, philosophy of language, and other disciplines probing the nature and origin of human communication. Building on the pioneering work of Plato and Aristotle, these thinkers developed a wide range of theories about the nature and origin of language which reflected broader philosophical commitments. In this collection of nine essays, a team of distinguished scholars examines the philosophies of language developed by, (...)
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  24. The Concept of ‘Phantasia’ From the Late Hellenistic Period to Early Neoplatonism.Gerard Watson - 1987 - In Wolfgang Haase (ed.), Philosophie, Wissenschaften, Technik. Philosophie. De Gruyter. pp. 4765-4811.
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  25. Oikeiosis and the Natural Bases of Morality. From Classical Stoicism to Modern Philosophy.Alejandro G. Vigo (ed.) - 2012 - Georg Olms Verlag.
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  26. The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates.René Brouwer - 2013 - Cambridge University Press.
    After Plato and Aristotle, the Stoics, from the third century BCE onwards, developed the third great classical conception of wisdom. This book offers a reconstruction of this pivotal notion in Stoicism, starting out from the two extant Stoic definitions, 'knowledge of human and divine matters' and 'fitting expertise'. It focuses not only on the question of what they understood by wisdom, but also on how wisdom can be achieved, how difficult it is to become a sage, and how this difficulty (...)
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  27. Moral Rules and the Aims of Stoic Ethics.Phillip Mitsis - 1986 - Journal of Philosophy 83 (10):556.
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  28. The Stoic and Epicurean Philosophers.P. O. K. & Whitney J. Oates - 1941 - Journal of Philosophy 38 (16):446.
  29. The Stoic Tradition From Antiquity to the Early Middle Ages, 1: Stoicism in Classical Latin Literature; 2: Stoicism in Christian Latin Thought Through the Sixth Century.Marcia L. Colish. [REVIEW]Jill Kraye - 1990 - Speculum 65 (3):633-636.
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  30. Germanic Kinship Structure: Studies in Law and Society in Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. Alexander Callander Murray.Bernard Bachrach - 1985 - Speculum 60 (4):1003-1004.
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  31. The Presence of Stoicism in Medieval Thought. Gerard Verbeke.Marcia L. Colish - 1984 - Speculum 59 (2):449-450.
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  32. Parody in the Middle Ages: The Latin Tradition.Martha Bayless.Ronald Pepin - 1998 - Speculum 73 (3):807-809.
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  33. VI—The Logical Basis of Stoic Ethics.A. A. Long - 1971 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 71 (1):85-104.
  34. Archimedes in the Middle Ages. Volume 1: The Arabo-Latin Tradition. By Marshall Clagett. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press. Pp. Xxxii + 720. 1964. $12.00. [REVIEW]M. A. Hoskin - 1967 - British Journal for the History of Science 3 (3):296-296.
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  35. Richard Sorabji, Time, Creation and the Continuum: Theories in Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. London: Duckworth, 1983. Pp. Xviii + 473. ISBN 0-7156-1693-5. £29.50. [REVIEW]G. J. Whitrow - 1985 - British Journal for the History of Science 18 (3):349-351.
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  36. Margaret J. Osler , Atoms, Pneuma, and Tranquility. Epicurean and Stoic Themes in European Thought. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991. Pp. Xii + 304. ISBN 0-521-40048-1. £32.50, $49.50. [REVIEW]Gad Freudenthal - 1993 - British Journal for the History of Science 26 (1):86-88.
  37. On the Doctrines of Hippocrates and PlatoPhillip De Lacy Galen of Pergamon.John Scarborough - 1980 - Isis 71 (2):334-335.
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  38. The Origins of Stoic Cosmology. David E. Hahm.James Longrigg - 1978 - Isis 69 (2):289-290.
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  39. On Some References to Experience in Stoic Physics.S. Sambursky - 1958 - Isis 49 (3):331-335.
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  40. Stoic LogicBenson Mates.Joseph T. Clark - 1953 - Isis 44 (3):291-293.
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  41. The Arabic Translation of Aratus' Phaenomena.Ernest Honigmann - 1950 - Isis 41 (1):30-31.
  42. The Acceptance of the Stoic Thesis on Affections (Pathē).Jessica S. Janneck - manuscript
    The Acceptance of the Stoic Thesis on Affections (Pathē) -/- In this paper, I argue that the Stoic claim that one should strive towards having no affections (pathē) is a plausible and, moreover, true claim given the context of the Stoic thesis on affections (pathē) in relationship to their philosophy of the ultimate goal (telos) of life. Given the conception of affections (pathē) that the Stoics intended, the irrefutability that one should strive towards having no affections (pathē) is found in (...)
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  43. Ethics After Aristotle. By Brad Inwood.Brian E. Johnson - 2016 - International Philosophical Quarterly 56 (1):120-122.
  44. The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates.Peter Vernezze - 2015 - Ancient Philosophy 35 (2):477-479.
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  45. Platonic Anticipations of Stoic Logic.Attila Fáj - 1971 - Apeiron 5 (2):1-19.
  46. The Master Argument.Richard L. Purtill - 1973 - Apeiron 7 (1):31 - 36.
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  47. The Stoic Doctrine of Generic and Specific Pathē.Robert J. Rabel - 1975 - Apeiron 9 (1).
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  48. The Stoic Features of the Book of Jonah.Attila Fáj - 1978 - Apeiron 12 (2):34.
  49. Physics of the Stoics.A. Wasserstein - 1959 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 83:186-190.
  50. The Stoic Attitude.C. C. Braddock - 1923 - Australasian Journal of Psychology and Philosophy 1 (1):67-69.
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