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  1. C. A. (1962). The English Debate on Suicide From Donne to Hume. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 16 (2):399-399.
  2. Felicia Nimue Ackerman (2007). Lucinda Among the Bioethicists. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (6):61-62.
  3. Attila Ataner (2006). Kant on Capital Punishment and Suicide. Kant-Studien 97 (4):452-482.
    From a juridical standpoint, Kant ardently upholds the state's right to impose the death penalty in accordance with the law of retribution. At the same time, from an ethical standpoint, Kant maintains a strict proscription against suicide. The author proposes that this latter position is inconsistent with and undercuts the former. However, Kant's division between external (juridical) and internal (moral) lawgiving is an obstacle to any argument against Kant's endorsement of capital punishment based on his own disapprobation of suicide. Nevertheless, (...)
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  4. Scott Atran, The Moral Logic and Growth of Suicide Terrorism.
    Suicide attack is the most virulent and horrifying form of terrorism in the world today. The mere rumor of an impending suicide attack can throw thousands of people into panic. This occurred during a Shi‘a procession in Iraq in late August 2005, causing hundreds of deaths. Although suicide attacks account for a minority of all terrorist acts, they are responsible for a majority of all terrorism-related casualties, and the rate of attacks is rising rapidly across the globe. During 2000–2004, there (...)
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  5. Scott Atran, Genesis of Suicide Terrorism.
    Contemporary suicide terrorists from the Middle East are publicly deemed crazed cowards bent on senseless destruction who thrive in poverty and ignorance. Recent research indicates they have no appreciable psychopathology and are as educated and economically well-off as surrounding populations. A first line of defense is to get the communities from which suicide attackers stem to stop the attacks by learning how to minimize the receptivity of mostly ordinary people to recruiting organizations.
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  6. Francis Bacon (1638). The Historie of Life and Death. Arno Press.
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  7. Bernard Baertschi (2003). Le suicide est «un vol fait au genre humain». Revue Philosophique De Louvain 101 (1):58-70.
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  8. M. Pabst Battin (1980). Manipulated Suicide. Bioethics Quarterly 2 (2):123-134.
    To accept a notion of rational suicide, as many contemporary bioethicists now urge, first makes possible certain kinds of manipulation into suicide which do not occur in suicide-impermissive societies. This paper describes the two principal mechanisms by which an individual can be manipulated into choosing to kill himself or herself, though that individual would not have done so otherwise, and identifies circumstantial and ideological changes in contemporary society which may be associated with such manipulation now and in the future. However, (...)
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  9. Margaret P. Battin (1994). Going Early, Going Late: The Rationality of Decisions About Suicide in Aids. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 19 (6):571-594.
    Where assistance in suicide is readily available to those dying of AIDS, as in the west coast gay communities of the United States and in the Netherlands, we must examine the different roles of physicians and friends (including lovers, spouses, family members, religious advisors, members of support groups, and intimate others) in helping a person with AIDS decide about and carry out suicide. This paper makes a central assumption: that where assistance in suicide is available, it is the moral obligation (...)
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  10. Tom L. Beauchamp (1980). Suicide. In Tom L. Beauchamp & Tom Regan (eds.), Matters of Life and Death. Temple University Press.
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  11. Carl B. Becker (1990). Buddhist Views of Suicide and Euthanasia. Philosophy East and West 40 (4):543-556.
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  12. David Benatar (ed.) (2009). Life, Death, and Meaning: Key Philosophical Readings on the Big Questions. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Introduction -- Part I: The meaning of life -- Richard Taylor, The meaning of life -- Thomas Nagel, The absurd -- Richard Hare, Nothing matters -- W.D. Joske, Philosophy and the meaning of life -- Robert Nozick, Philosophy and the meaning of life -- David Schmidtz, The meanings of life -- Part II: Creating people -- Derek Parfit, Whether causing someone to exist can benefit this person -- John Leslie, Why not let life ecome extinct? -- James Lenman, On becoming (...)
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  13. Ayesha Rachel Bhavsar (2013). Respect and Rationality: The Challenge of Attempted Suicide. American Journal of Bioethics: 13 (3):24 - 25.
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  14. Ayesha Rachel Bhavsar (2013). Respect and Rationality: The Challenge of Attempted Suicide. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (3):24-25.
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  15. George F. Blackall, Rebecca L. Volpe & Michael J. Green (2013). After the Suicide Attempt: Offering Patients Another Chance. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (3):14 - 16.
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  16. Bruce Bongar (1992). The Ethical Issue of Competence in Working with the Suicidal Patient. Ethics and Behavior 2 (2):75 – 89.
    In this article, I discuss the ethical need for competence in the assessment and management of the suicidal patient, and further suggest that this specific competence be considered a routine element in professional psychological practice. I also argue that this particular competence necessitates adequate training in working with this high-risk population, as well as the need for every clinician to personally evaluate her or his own technical and personal competencies to work with suicidal patients before beginning independent practice activities in (...)
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  17. Iain Brassington (2011). If Suicide is Painless, is Painlessness Suicide? American Journal of Bioethics 11 (6):54 - 55.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 6, Page 54-55, June 2011.
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  18. Samuel M. Brown, C. Gregory Elliott & Robert Paine (2013). Withdrawal of Nonfutile Life Support After Attempted Suicide. American Journal of Bioethics: 13 (3):3 - 12.
    End-of-life decision making is fraught with ethical challenges. Withholding or withdrawing life support therapy is widely considered ethical in patients with high treatment burden, poor premorbid status, or significant projected disability even when such treatment is not ?futile.? Whether such withdrawal of therapy in the aftermath of attempted suicide is ethical is not well established in the literature. We provide a clinical vignette and propose criteria under which such withdrawal would be ethical. We suggest that it is appropriate to withdraw (...)
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  19. Matthew Burstein (2009). The Thanatoria of Soylent Green: On Reconciling the Good Life with the Good Death. In Sandra Shapshay (ed.), Bioethics at the Movies. Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 275.
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  20. F. Buyse, Spinoza on Conatus, Inertia and the Impossibility of Self-Destruction.
    Suicide or self-destruction means in ordinary language “the act of killing oneself deliberately” (intentionally or on purpose). Indeed, that’s what we read in the Oxford dictionary and the Oxford dictionary of philosophy , which seems to be confirmed by the etymology of the term “suicide”, a term introduced around mid-17th century deduced from the modern Latin suicidium, ‘act of suicide’. Traditionally, suicide was regarded as immoral, irreligious and illegal in Western culture. However, during the 17th century this Christian view started (...)
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  21. R. Campbell (1996). Gavin Fairbairn Contemplating Suicide: The Language and Ethics of Self Harm. Journal of Applied Philosophy 13:225-226.
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  22. Marc Champagne (2011). What About Suicide Bombers? A Terse Response to a Terse Objection. Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 11 (2):233–236.
    Stressing that the pronoun "I" picks out one and only one person in the world (i.e., me), I argue against Hunt (and other like-minded Rand commentators) that the supposed "hard case" of destructive people who do not care for their own lives poses no special difficulty for rational egoism. I conclude that the proper response to a terse objection like "What about suicide bombers?" is the equally terse assertion "But I don't want to get blown up.".
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  23. Michael Cholbi (2015). Kant on Euthanasia and the Duty to Die: Clearing the Air. Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (8):607-610.
    Thanks to recent scholarship, Kant is no longer seen as the dogmatic opponent of suicide he appears at first glance. However, some interpreters have recently argued for a Kantian view of the morality of suicide with surprising, even radical, implications. More specifically, they have argued that Kantianism requires that those with dementia or other rationality-eroding conditions end their lives before their condition results in their loss of identity as moral agents, and requires subjecting the fully demented or those confronting future (...)
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  24. Michael Cholbi (2015). Medically Enabled Suicides. In M. Cholbi J. Varelius (ed.), New Directions in the Ethics of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia. Springer. pp. 169-184.
    What I call medically enabled suicides have four distinctive features: 1. They are instigated by actions of a suicidal individual, actions she intends to result in a physiological condition that, absent lifesaving medical interventions, would be otherwise fatal to that individual. 2. These suicides are ‘completed’ due to medical personnel acting in accordance with recognized legal or ethical protocols requiring the withholding or withdrawal of care from patients (e.g., following an approved advance directive). 3. The suicidal individual acts purposefully to (...)
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  25. Michael Cholbi (2015). No Last Resort: Pitting the Right to Die Against the Right to Medical Self-Determination. Journal of Ethics 19 (2):143-157.
    Many participants in debates about the morality of assisted dying maintain that individuals may only turn to assisted dying as a ‘last resort’, i.e., that a patient ought to be eligible for assisted dying only after she has exhausted certain treatment or care options. Here I argue that this last resort condition is unjustified, that it is in fact wrong to require patients to exhaust a prescribed slate of treatment or care options before being eligible for assisted dying. The last (...)
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  26. Michael Cholbi (2013). Kantian Paternalism and Suicide Intervention. In Christian Coons Michael Weber (ed.), Paternalism: Theory and Practice. Cambridge University Press.
    Defends Kantian paternalism: Interference with an individual’s liberty for her own sake is justified absent her actual consent only to the extent that such interference stands a reasonable chance of preventing her from exercising her liberty irrationally in light of the rationally chosen ends that constitute her conception of the good. More specifically, interference with an individual’s liberty is permissible only if, by interfering, we stand a reasonable chance of preventing that agent from performing actions she chose due to distorted (...)
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  27. Michael Cholbi (2013). The Terminal, the Futile, and the Psychiatrically Disordered. International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 36.
    The various jurisdictions worldwide that now legally permit assisted suicide (or voluntary euthanasia) vary concerning the medical conditions needed to be legally eligible for assisted suicide. Some jurisdictions require that an individual be suffering from an unbearable and futile medical condition that cannot be alleviated. Others require that individuals must be suffering from a terminal illness that will result in death within a specified timeframe, such as six months. -/- Popular and academic discourse about assisted suicide paradigmatically focuses on individuals (...)
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  28. Michael Cholbi (2012). What is Wrong with “What is Wrong with Rational Suicide”. Philosophia 40 (2):285-293.
    In “What is Wrong with Rational Suicide,” Pilpel and Amsel develop a counterexample that allegedly confounds attempts to condition the moral permissibility of suicide on its rationality. In this counterexample, a healthy middle aged woman with significant life accomplishments, but no dependents, disease, or mental disorder opts to end her life painlessly after reading philosophical texts that persuade her that life is meaningless and bereft of intrinsic value. Many people would judge her suicide “a bad mistake” despite its meeting “robust” (...)
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  29. Michael Cholbi (2012). Suicide. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  30. Michael Cholbi (2011). Suicide: The Philosophical Dimensions. Broadview Press.
    Suicide: The Philosophical Dimensions is a provocative and comprehensive investigation of the main philosophical issues surrounding suicide. Readers will encounter seminal arguments concerning the nature of suicide and its moral permissibility, the duty to die, the rationality of suicide, and the ethics of suicide intervention. Intended both for students and for seasoned scholars, this book sheds much-needed philosophical light on one of the most puzzling and enigmatic human behaviors.
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  31. Michael Cholbi (2010). The Duty to Die and the Burdensomeness of Living. Bioethics 24 (8):412-420.
    This article addresses the question of whether the arguments for a duty to die given by John Hardwig, the most prominent philosophical advocate of such a duty, are sound. Hardwig believes that the duty to die is relatively widespread among those with burdensome illnesses, dependencies, or medical conditions. I argue that although there are rare circumstances in which individuals have a duty to die, the situations Hardwig describes are not among these.After reconstructing Hardwig's argument for such a duty, highlighting his (...)
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  32. Michael Cholbi (2010). A Kantian Defense of Prudential Suicide. Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (4):489-515.
    Kant's claim that the rational will has absolute value or dignity appears to render any prudential suicide morally impermissible. Although the previous appeals of Kantians (e. g., David Velleman) to the notion that pain or mental anguish can compromise dignity and justify prudential suicide are unsuccessful, these appeals suggest three constraints that an adequate Kantian defense of prudential suicide must meet. Here I off er an account that meets these constraints. Central to this account is the contention that some suicidal (...)
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  33. Michael Cholbi (2008). Entry On'suicide'in. In Edward Zalta (ed.), Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  34. Michael Cholbi (2007). 'Self-Manslaughter' and the Forensic Classification of Self-Inflicted Deaths. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (3):155-157.
    By emphasising the intentions underlying suicidal behaviour, suicidal death is distinguished from accidental death in standard philosophical accounts on the nature of suicide. A crucial third class of self-produced deaths, deaths in which agents act neither intentionally nor accidentally to produce their own deaths, is left out by such accounts. Based on findings from psychiatry, many life-threatening behaviours, if and when they lead to the agent’s death, are suggested to be neither intentional nor accidental, with many apparently suicidal behaviours being (...)
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  35. Michael Cholbi (2002). Suicide Intervention and Non–Ideal Kantian Theory. Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (3):245–259.
    Philosophical discussions of the morality of suicide have tended to focus on its justifiability from an agent’s point of view rather than on the justifiability of attempts by others to intervene so as to prevent it. This paper addresses questions of suicide intervention within a broadly Kantian perspective. In such a perspective, a chief task is to determine the motives underlying most suicidal behaviour. Kant wrongly characterizes this motive as one of self-love or the pursuit of happiness. Psychiatric and scientific (...)
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  36. Michael Cholbi (2000). Kant and the Irrationality of Suicide. History of Philosophy Quarterly 17 (2):159-176.
    Though Kant calls the prohibition against suicide the first duty of human beings to themselves, his arguments for this duty lack his characteristic rigor and systematicity. The lack of a single authoritative Kantian approach to suicide casts doubt on what is generally regarded as an extreme and implausible position, to wit, that not only is suicide wrong in every circumstance, but is among the gravest moral wrongs. Here I try to remedy this lack of systematicity in order to show that (...)
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  37. Noam Chomsky (1986). The Rationality of Collective Suicide. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 16 (sup1):23-39.
    (1986). The Rationality of Collective Suicide. Canadian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 16, Supplementary Volume 12: Nuclear Weapons, Deterrence and Disarmament, pp. 23-39.
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  38. D. Cooley (2006). Crimina Carnis and Morally Obligatory Suicide. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 9 (3):357-357.
    The common consensus on suicide seems to be that even if taking one's life is permissible on some basis, it cannot be morally obligatory. In fact, one argument often used against Utilitarianism is that the principle sometimes requires individuals to sacrifice themselves for the benefit of others, as in the case of healthy individuals who can donate all their life saving organs to those in need of transplants.However, a plausible philosophical case can be built for morally obligatory suicide. First, although (...)
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  39. Dennis Cooley & Dennis R. Cooley (2015). A Duty to Suicide. In Dennis Cooley & Dennis R. Cooley (eds.), Death’s Values and Obligations: A Pragmatic Framework. Springer Verlag.
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  40. Victor Cosculluela (1996). The Right to Suicide. Journal of Value Inquiry 30 (3):431-443.
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  41. Victor Cosculluela (1994). The Ethics of Suicide Prevention. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 9 (1):35-41.
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  42. Victor Cosculluela (1993). The Ethics of Suicide. Dissertation, University of Miami
    Ethical issues raised by suicide are considered in this work. Chapter 1 concerns the analysis of the concept of suicide. It is found that suicide must be defined by reference to the agent's intentions. Chapters 2 and 3 focus on anti-suicide arguments. It is found that none of these arguments shows that suicide is always wrong, though they do show that other-regarding factors must be considered when estimating the moral status of suicide. Chapter 4 presents the view that, given certain (...)
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  43. Christopher Cowley (2006). Suicide is Neither Rational nor Irrational. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 9 (5):495 - 504.
    Richard Brandt, following Hume, famously argued that suicide could be rational. In this he was going against a common ‘absolutist’ view that suicide is irrational almost by definition. Arguments to the effect that suicide is morally permissible or prohibited tend to follow from one’s position on this first issue of rationality. I want to argue that the concept of rationality is not appropriately ascribed – or withheld – to the victim or the act or the desire to commit the act. (...)
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  44. David Daube (1972). The Linguistics of Suicide. Philosophy and Public Affairs 1 (4):387-437.
  45. John Donne & Ernest W. Sullivan (1984). Biathanatos.
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  46. Stephen L. Esquith (2013). Sacrifice, Dignity, and Suicide. Political Theory 41 (2):336-342.
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  47. Fred Feldman (1992). Confrontations with the Reaper: A Philosophical Study of the Nature and Value of Death. Oxford University Press.
    What is death? Do people survive death? What do we mean when we say that someone is "dying"? Presenting a clear and engaging discussion of the classic philosophical questions surrounding death, this book studies the great metaphysical and moral problems of death. In the first part, Feldman shows that a definition of life is necessary before death can be defined. After exploring several of the most plausible accounts of the nature of life and demonstrating their failure, he goes on to (...)
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  48. Celia B. Fisher (2003). Adolescent and Parent Perspectives on Ethical Issues in Youth Drug Use and Suicide Survey Research. Ethics and Behavior 13 (4):303 – 332.
    The contributions of adolescent and parent perspectives to ethical planning of survey research on youth drug use and suicide behaviors are highlighted through an empirical examination of 322 7th-12th graders' and 160 parents' opinions on questions related to 4 ethical dimensions of survey research practice: (a)evaluating research risks and benefits, (b)establishing guardian permission requirements, (c)developing confidentiality and disclosure policies, and (d)using cash incentives for recruitment. Generational and ethnic variation in response to questionnaire items developed from discussions within adolescent and parent (...)
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  49. R. G. Frey (1999). Hume on Suicide. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (4):336 – 351.
    Anyone interested in the morality of suicide reads David Hume's essay on the subject even today. There are numerous reasons for this, but the central one is that it sets up the starting point for contemporary debate about the morality of suicide, namely, the debate about whether some condition of life could present one with a morally acceptable reason for autonomously deciding to end one's life. We shall only be able to have this debate if we think that at least (...)
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  50. Geoffrey Frost (2009). Response to Max Malikow on Altruistic Suicide. Philosophy Pathways 142.
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