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  1. Perspectives on Sustainability Assessment: An Integral Approach to Historical Changes in Social Systems and Water Environment in the Ili River Basin of Central Eurasia, 1900–2008.Tomohiro Akiyama, Jia Li, Jumpei Kubota, Yuki Konagaya & Mitsuko Watanabe - 2012 - World Futures 68 (8):595-627.
    This article proposes an alternative approach in sustainability assessment. The conceptual framework was developed by modifying Ken Wilber's All Quadrants, All Levels (AQAL) approach, and focuses on the inter-relatedness/inter-connection of various perspectives inherent to the concept of sustainability. To look at how our framework can facilitate the practice of sustainability assessment, we apply the framework to examine the relationships between social systems and the environmental changes in the Ili River basin across the period 1900?2008. This approach enables us to investigate (...)
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  2. The Cultural Background of the Sustainability of the Traditional Farming System in the Ghouta the Oasis of Damascus, Syria.Sameer K. Alhamidi, Mats Gustafsson, Hans Larsson & Per Hillbur - 2003 - Agriculture and Human Values 20 (3):231-240.
    This paper discusses thepractical impact of a non-materialistic cultureon sustainable farm management.Two elements are discussed: first, how deeplyrooted religion is in this culture; second,the feasibility of using both human knowledgeand experience, so-called tradition and divineguidance in management. Finally, theimplications of the fusion of these twoelements are drawn. The outcome is thecapability of man to integrate ethical valuesinto decisions and actions. This integration,when applied by skilled farmers, leads to amanagement of natural resources in analtruistic fashion and not merely to economicends. Moreover, (...)
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  3. From Value to Values: Sustainable Consumption at Farmers Markets. [REVIEW]Alison Hope Alkon - 2008 - Agriculture and Human Values 25 (4):487-498.
    Advocates of environmental sustainability and social justice increasingly pursue their goals through the promotion of so-called “green” products such as locally grown organic produce. While many scholars support this strategy, others criticize it harshly, arguing that environmental degradation and social injustice are inherent results of capitalism and that positive social change must be achieved through collective action. This study draws upon 18 months of ethnographic fieldwork at two farmers markets located in demographically different parts of the San Francisco Bay Area (...)
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  4. Sustainability Practices and Corporate Financial Performance: A Study Based on the Top Global Corporations. [REVIEW]Rashid Ameer & Radiah Othman - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 108 (1):61-79.
    Sustainability is concerned with the impact of present actions on the ecosystems, societies, and environments of the future. Such concerns should be reflected in the strategic planning of sustainable corporations. Strategic intentions of this nature are operationalized through the adoption of a long-term focus and a more inclusive set of responsibilities focusing on ethical practices, employees, environment, and customers. A central hypothesis, that we test in this paper is that companies which attend to this set of responsibilities under the term (...)
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  5. Author Meets Critics Panel: Paul B. Thompson's (2010) The Agrarian Vision: Sustainability and Environmental Ethics. [REVIEW]Raymond Anthony - 2012 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (4):499-501.
    Author Meets Critics Panel: Paul B. Thompson’s (2010) The Agrarian Vision: Sustainability and Environmental Ethics Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-3 DOI 10.1007/s10806-011-9340-4 Authors Raymond Anthony, Department of Philosophy, University of Alaska Anchorage, 3211 Providence Drive, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA Journal Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics Online ISSN 1573-322X Print ISSN 1187-7863.
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  6. Sustainable Agriculture is Humane, Humane Agriculture is Sustainable.Michael C. Appleby - 2005 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (3):293-303.
    Procedures that increase the sustainability of agriculture often result in animals being treated more humanely:both livestock in animal and mixed farming and wildlife in arable farming. Equally, procedures ensuring humane treatment of farm animals often increase sustainability, for example in disease control and manure management. This overlap between sustainability and humaneness is not coincidental. Both approaches can be said to be animal centered, to be based on the fact that animal production is primarily a biological process. Proponents of both will (...)
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  7. Promoting Ethical and Environmental Awareness in Vulnerable Communities: A Research Action Plan.Ulisses Araújo - 2012 - Journal of Moral Education 41 (3):389-397.
    Urban populations that live in the outskirts of major Latin American cities usually face conditions of vulnerability attached to complex environmental issues, such as the lack of sewerage, floods, pollution and soil and water contamination. This article reports an intervention research programme in S?o Paulo, Brazil that combines a moral education approach with sustainability awareness in vulnerable communities. The main conceptual foundations of the project, designed to empower the community and promote ethical and environmental awareness are: strengthening the ties between (...)
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  8. Responsibility for the Global Environment.Robin Attfield - 1998 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 12 (2):181-186.
    It is argued here that countries have an obligation to enter agreements that would significantly constrain the play of free-market forces in order to tackle the problems of the global environment. On the way, a realist understanding of the global environment is first defended (Section I), as is a strong (as opposed to weak or ultra-strong) understanding of sustainability (Section II). Criticisms are then presented to the project of incorporating the natural environment into the market (Section III). International agreements are (...)
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  9. Sustainability.Robin Attfield & Barry Wilkins - 1994 - Environmental Values 3 (2):155 - 158.
    This paper supplies a critique of the view that a practice which ought not to be followed is ipso facto not sustainable, a view recently defended by Nigel Dower. It is argued that there are ethical criteria independent of the criterion of sustainability. The concept of sustainability is thus retrieved for the distinctive role and the important service in which environmental and social theorists (paradoxically including Dower) have hitherto employed it, not least when debating the nature, merits and demerits of (...)
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  10. Strong Versus Weak Sustainability: Economics, Natural Sciences, and Consilience.Robert Ayres, Jeroen van den Berrgh & John Gowdy - 2001 - Environmental Ethics 23 (2):155-168.
    The meaning of sustainability is the subject of intense debate among environmental and resource economists. Perhaps no other issue separates more clearly the traditional economic view from the views of most natural scientists. The debate currently focuses on the substitutability between the economy and the environment or between “natural capital” and “manufactured capital”—a debate captured in terms of weak versus strong sustainability. In this article, we examine the various interpretations of these concepts. We conclude that natural science and economic perspectives (...)
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  11. Adaptive Ideals and Aspirational Goals: The Utopian Ideals and Realist Constraints of Climate Change Adaptation.Patrik Baard - 2015 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (4):739-757.
    There is a growing need to implement anticipatory climate change adaptation measures, particularly in vulnerable sectors, such as in agriculture. However, setting goals to adapt is wrought with several challenges. This paper discusses two sets of challenges to goals of anticipatory adaptation, of empirical and normative character. The first set of challenges concern issues such as the extent to which the climate will change, the local impacts of such changes, and available adaptive responses. In the second set of uncertainties are (...)
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  12. Cautious Utopias: Environmental Goal-Setting with Long Time Frames.Patrik Baard & Karin Edvardsson Björnberg - 2015 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (2):187-201.
    Sustainable development is a common goal in the public sector but may be difficult to implement due to epistemic uncertainties and the long time frames required. This paper proposes that some of these problems can be solved by formulating cautious utopias, entailing a relationship between means and goals differing from both utopian and realistic goal-setting. Cautiously utopian goals are believed, but not certain, to be achievable and to remain desirable, but are open to future adjustments due to changing desires and/or (...)
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  13. Understanding Sustainable Architecture: Terry Williamson, Antony Radford and Helen Bennetts. Spon Press, 2003. [REVIEW]Greg Bamford - 2005 - Architecture Australia 94 (5):50.
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  14. Sustainability and Well-Being: The Middle Path to Environment, Society, and the Economy.Asoka Bandarage - 2013 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Introduction : environment, society, and the economy -- Environmental, social, and economic collapse -- Evolution of the domination paradigm -- Ecological and social justice movements -- Ethical path to sustainability and well-being.
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  15. The Isle of Harris Superquarry: Concepts of the Environment and Sustainability.Harry Barton - 1996 - Environmental Values 5 (2):97-122.
    In 1991 Redland Aggregates Ltd. put forward a proposal to embark upon the largest mining project in Europe, the chosen location being the remote island of Harris and Lewis in the Western Isles of Scotland. The proposal sparked off an impassioned debate between planners, conservationists and developers, while the local residents have attempted to come to terms with an operation on a scale previously inconceivable on the island. This paper attempts to examine the proposed development from a sociological angle – (...)
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  16. Fatally Confused: Telling the Time in the Midst of Ecological Crises.Michelle Bastian - 2012 - Journal of Environmental Philosophy 9 (1):23-48.
    Focusing particularly on the role of the clock in social life, this article explores the conventions we use to “tell the time.” I argue that although clock time generally appears to be an all-encompassing tool for social coordination, it is actually failing to coordinate us with some of the most pressing ecological changes currently taking place. Utilizing philosophical approaches to performativity to explore what might be going wrong, I then draw on Derrida’s and Haraway’s understandings of social change in order (...)
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  17. How Would You Like Your 'Sustainability', Sir? Weak or Strong? A Reply to My Critics.Wilfred Beckerman - 1995 - Environmental Values 4 (2):169 - 179.
    This article concentrates on the Jacobs and Daly criticisms (Environmental Values, Spring 1994) of my earlier article in the same journal (Autumn 1994) criticising the concept of 'sustainable development'. Daly and Jacobs agreed with my criticisms of 'weak' sustainability, but defended 'strong' sustainability on the grounds that natural and manmade capital were 'complements' in the productive process and that economists are wrong, therefore, in assuming that they are infinitely substitutable. This article maintains that they are confusing different concepts of 'complementarity' (...)
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  18. Les Métamorphoses de l'Organicisme En Écologie: De la Communauté Végétale aux Écosystèmes/The Metamorphoses of Organicism in Ecology: From Plant Community to Ecosystems.Donato Bergandi - 1999 - Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 52 (1):5-32.
    L'écologie préénergétique des années 1905-1935 est à la recherche de ses objets d'étude. Des unités fondamentales de la nature (telles que formation végétale, association végétale, climax, biome, communauté biotique, écosystème) se trouvent en compétition et se succèdent les unes aux autres. Autour des années 1920 et 1930, la philosophie organiciste d'Alfred N. Whitehead, ainsi que la perspective évolutionniste d'Herbert Spencer et les propositions émergentistes de Samuel Alexander et Conwy L. Morgan, deviennent des références sous-jacentes au débat épistémologique concernant les unités (...)
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  19. De la protection de la nature au développement durable : Genèse d'un oxymore éthique et politique.Donato Bergandi & Patrick Blandin - 2012 - Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 1 (1):103-142.
    Le concept de développement durable s’enracine dans l’histoire des mouvements de préservation de la nature et de conservation des ressources naturelles et de leurs relations avec les sciences de la nature, en particulier l’écologie. En tant que paradigme sociétal, à la fois écologique, politique et économique, il se présente comme un projet politique idéal applicable à l’ensemble des sociétés, qui prétend dépasser l’opposition entre ces deux visions profondément divergentes des relations homme‑nature. L’analyse des textes internationaux pertinents permet de dégager les (...)
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  20. Le développement durable : Les racines environnementalistes d’un paradigme.Donato Bergandi & Fabienne Galangau-Quérat - 2008 - Aster 46:31-43.
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  21. A Way Out From the Wrongful Environmental Mindset: The Origins and Possible Solutions to the Tragedy of the Commons.Paweł Bernat - 2013 - Philosophy and Practice of Sustainable Development.
    The paper indicates and discusses three phenomena identified as the main origins of the mindset responsible for the tragedy of the global commons, namely (1) Cornucopianism, (2) rationality of self-interest and egoism, and (3) the presupposed instrumental value of nature. It is demonstrated that all those theses can be philosophically and ethically dismissed and thus, the wrongful environmental mindset built around them should be rejected. It is further argued that the up-to-date solutions to the tragedy are unsatisfactory. Moreover, the tragedy (...)
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  22. How Trash Figures in Sustainability in Culture and Biology.Sugata Bhattacharya - 2009 - Semiotics:561-568.
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  23. The Very Idea of Sustainability.Charles V. Blatz - 1992 - Agriculture and Human Values 9 (4):12-28.
    Discussions of the desirability and ethical justifiability of sustainable agriculture are frequently impeded, if not derailed by the variety of meanings attached to the term “sustainable.” This paper suggests a taxonomy of different notions of sustainability distinguishing between agricultural product and process sustainability, in both static and dynamic forms, pursued by reductive (extractive), compensatory, regenerative, and induced homeostasis strategies. The discussion then goes on to argue that ethics demand sustainable agriculture. Finally the paper tries to identify just which types of (...)
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  24. Education for Sustainable Development: Sustainability as a Frame of Mind.M. Bonnett - 2003 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 37 (4):675-690.
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  25. Sustainability, Epistemology, Ecocentric Business, and Marketing Strategy: Ideology, Reality, and Vision. [REVIEW]Helen Borland & Adam Lindgreen - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (1):173-187.
    This conceptual article examines the relationship between marketing and sustainability through the dual lenses of anthropocentric and ecocentric epistemology. Using the current anthropocentric epistemology and its associated dominant social paradigm, corporate ecological sustainability in commercial practice and business school research and teaching is difficult to achieve. However, adopting an ecocentric epistemology enables the development of an alternative business and marketing approach that places equal importance on nature, the planet, and ecological sustainability as the source of human and other species’ well-being, (...)
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  26. Sustainability Perspectives.Lionel Boxer - 2008 - Philosophy of Management 6 (2):87-97.
    Various stakeholders approach sustainability in their own way. How they do this is reflected in their discursive behaviour. The stakeholder groups explored here include Traditional Shareholders, Incentive-Coerced Management, Pro-Sustainability Corporate, and Activists. Each of these stakeholder groups is shown to engage in a unique discourse, which provides insight into how each approach sustainability. This paper draws on Foucault’s ideas to help understand these discourses in terms of a framework based on Harré’s positioning theory. A new level of understanding is derived (...)
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  27. The Savings Problem in the Original Position: Assessing and Revising a Model.Eric Brandstedt - 2017 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 47 (2-3):269-89.
    The common conception of justice as reciprocity seemingly is inapplicable to relations between non-overlapping generations. This is a challenge also to John Rawls’s theory of justice as fairness. This text responds to this by way of reinterpreting and developing Rawls’s theory. First, by examining the original position as a model, some revisions of it are shown to be wanting. Second, by drawing on the methodology of constructivism, an alternative solution is proposed: an amendment to the primary goods named ‘sustainability of (...)
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  28. The Construction of a Sustainable Development in Times of Climate Change.Eric Brandstedt - 2013 - Dissertation, Lund University
    This dissertation is a contribution to the debate about ‘climate justice’, i.e. a call for a just and feasible distribution of responsibility for addressing climate change. The main argument is a proposal for a cautious, practicable, and necessary step in the right direction: given the set of theoretical and practical obstacles to climate justice, we must begin by making contemporary development practices sustainable. In times of climate change, this is done by recognising and responding to the fact that emissions of (...)
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  29. The Concept of Sustainable Welfare.Eric Brandstedt & Maria Emmelin - 2016 - In Max Koch & Oksana Mont (eds.), Sustainability and the Political Economy of Welfare. Routledge. pp. 15-28.
    The meaning of welfare and the conditions for making it sustainable seemingly are related. This is at least a common idea in current discussions with the implicit assumption that conditions conducive to general welfare improvements also will secure certain sustainability objectives. In this chapter, we challenge this by way of a conceptual analysis of welfare, focused on its descriptive adequacy. Although there are different substantial theories about welfare, they all have to account for its subject-relative nature: individual welfare is whatever (...)
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  30. The Future is Not What It Used to Be: On the Roles and Function of Assumptions in Visions of the Future.Eric Brandstedt & Oksana Mont - 2016 - In Max Koch & Oksana Mont (eds.), Sustainability and the Political Economy of Welfare. Routledge. pp. 59-74.
    Any future-oriented work, whether of academic or policy kind, needs a vision of the future, however vague. It is well known that such predictions are bound to be wrong, at least on the margin. The question is how to minimise that threat and make reliable assumptions. In this chapter we discuss a strategy of hypothetical retrospection. By imagining a future state of the world that is radically different from the present, we scrutinise hidden assumptions and suppositions taken for granted in (...)
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  31. Just Sustainability? Sustainability and Social Justice in Professional Codes of Ethics for Engineers.Cletus S. Brauer - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):875-891.
    Should environmental, social, and economic sustainability be of primary concern to engineers? Should social justice be among these concerns? Although the deterioration of our natural environment and the increase in social injustices are among today’s most pressing and important issues, engineering codes of ethics and their paramountcy clause, which contains those values most important to engineering and to what it means to be an engineer, do not yet put either concept on a par with the safety, health, and welfare of (...)
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  32. Climate Change and Negative Duties.Thom Brooks - 2012 - POLITICS 32:1-9.
    It is widely accepted by the scientific community and beyond that human beings are primarily responsible for climate change and that climate change has brought with it a number of real problems. These problems include, but are not limited to, greater threats to coastal communities, greater risk of famine, and greater risk that tropical diseases may spread to new territory. In keeping with J. S. Mill's 'Harm Principle', green political theorists often respond that if we are contributing a harm to (...)
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  33. Ranking Policy Options for Sustainable Development.Georg Brun & Gertrude Hirsch Hadorn - 2008 - Poiesis and Praxis 5 (1):15-31.
    Sustainable development calls for choices among alternative policy options. It is a common view that such choices can be justified by appealing to an evaluative ranking of the options with respect to how their consequences affect a broad range of prudential and moral values. Three philosophically motivated proposals for analysing evaluative rankings are discussed: the measured merits model (e.g. Chang), the ordered values model (e.g. Griffin), and the permissible preference orderings model (Rabinowicz). The analysis focuses on the models’ potential for (...)
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  34. The Morality Behind Sustainability.Jeffrey Burkhardt - 1989 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 2 (2):113-128.
    The concepts of sustainable agriculture, organic agriculture, regenerative agriculture, and alternative agriculture are receiving increasing attention in the academic and popular literature on present trends and future directions of agriculture. Whatever the reasons for this interest, there nevertheless remain differences of opinion concerning what counts as a sustainable agriculture. One of the reasons for these differences is that the moral underpinnings of a policy of sustainability are not clear. By understanding the moral obligatoriness of sustainability, we can come to understand (...)
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  35. Will the Real Sustainability Concept Please Stand Up.J. Cairns - 2004 - Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 49:52.
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  36. Promoting Sustainability Through Community-Based Enterprise in Ecuador.Lisa Calvano - 2007 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:301-305.
    Using a case study approach, this paper documents and analyzes the development of an innovative business owned and operated by an indigenous community in the Ecuadorian Amazon. The enterprise represents a unique response to issues of environmental sustainability and economic development in a region threatened by oil production. Two research questions are examined: 1) what confluence of factors led a traditional and collectivist community to develop a successful business; and 2) what positive outcomes resulted in terms of environmental and economic (...)
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  37. Sustainability and Peasant Farming Systems: Observations From Zimbabwe. [REVIEW]B. M. Campbell, P. Bradley & S. E. Carter - 1997 - Agriculture and Human Values 14 (2):159-168.
    Many authors suggest the need to define ‘sustainable development’in operational terms. This paper looks at the problems ofattempting to ask whether peasant farming systems are sustainable.Any attempt at sustainability assessment needs to consider issuesrelated to the selected indicators or performance criteria, spatialscale or boundaries, and temporal scale. While there is certainlya need for more rigorous analysis of sustainability issues, thereis limited outlook for an approach based on indicators. Even if themany purely technical problems associated with specific indicatorscan be surmounted, will (...)
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  38. Climate Change and the Duties of the Advantaged.Simon Caney - 2010 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 13 (1):203-228.
    Climate change poses grave threats to many people, including the most vulnerable. This prompts the question of who should bear the burden of combating ?dangerous? climate change. Many appeal to the Polluter Pays Principle. I argue that it should play an important role in any adequate analysis of the responsibility to combat climate change, but suggest that it suffers from three limitations and that it needs to be revised. I then consider the Ability to Pay Principle and consider four objections (...)
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  39. Normative Dimensions of Sustainable Energy Policy.Sanya Carley - 2011 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 14 (2):211 - 229.
    Drawing a link between energy policy and sustainable development, this paper explores the normative dimensions of policy analysis that inform energy sector decision-making, and how these norms fall short of incorporating adequate considerations of sustainability. The discussion focuses on the obligations that our present generation has to conserve for future generations, the decision of which discount rate to use, and the importance of citizen-oriented preferences in economic valuation. This analysis concludes with the claim that if sustainability insights are applied to (...)
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  40. Sustainability Report and Bank Valuation: Evidence From European Stock Markets.Concetta Carnevale & Maria Mazzuca - 2014 - Business Ethics: A European Review 23 (1):69-90.
    Applying value relevance analysis to a sample of European banks, we test the following: (i) the direct effects of the sustainability report on stock price; (ii) whether the report modifies the value relevance of financial accounting variables (indirect effects); and (iii) whether the value relevance of sustainability reports varies across countries. Results show that investors appreciate the additional and complementary disclosure provided by the sustainability report and that this disclosure produces a positive effect on stock prices. Estimates of the indirect (...)
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  41. Sustainability Ratings and the Disciplinary Power of the Ideology of Numbers.Mohamed Chelli & Yves Gendron - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 112 (2):187-203.
    The main purpose of this paper is to better understand how sustainability rating agencies, through discourse, promote an “ideology of numbers” that ultimately aims to establish a regime of normalization governing social and environmental performance. Drawing on Thompson’s (Ideology and modern culture: Critical social theory in the era of mass communication, 1990 ) modes of operation of ideology, we examine the extent to which, and how, the ideology of numbers is reflected on websites and public documents published by a range (...)
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  42. Philosophy Comes to Dinner: Arguments on the Ethics of Eating.Andrew Chignell, Terence Cuneo & Matthew C. Halteman - 2015 - Routledge.
    Everyone is talking about food. Chefs are celebrities. "Locavore" and "freegan" have earned spots in the dictionary. Popular books and films about food production and consumption are exposing the unintended consequences of the standard American diet. Questions about the principles and values that ought to guide decisions about dinner have become urgent for moral, ecological, and health-related reasons. In _Philosophy Comes to Dinner_, twelve philosophers—some leading voices, some inspiring new ones—join the conversation, and consider issues ranging from the sustainability of (...)
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  43. Environmental and Economic Dimensions of Sustainability and Price Effects on Consumer Responses.Sungchul Choi & Alex Ng - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 104 (2):269-282.
    The lack of attention to sustainability, as a concept with multiple dimensions, has presented a developmental gap in green marketing literature, sustainability, and marketing literature for decades. Based on the established premise of customer–corporate (C–C) identification, in which consumers respond favorably to companies with corporate social responsibility initiatives that they identify with, we propose that consumers would respond similarly to companies with sustainability initiatives. We postulate that consumers care about protecting and preserving favorable economic environments (an economic dimension of sustainability) (...)
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  44. Beckerman and His Critics on Strong and Weak Sustainability: Confusing Concepts and Conditions.M. S. Common - 1996 - Environmental Values 5 (1):83 - 88.
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  45. Sustainability and Environmental Valuation.M. S. Common, R. K. Blamey & T. W. Norton - 1993 - Environmental Values 2 (4):299-334.
    For economists, sustainability and environmental valuation are connected in two ways. At the micro level, proper environmental valuation is required if projects are to be approved and rejected consistently with sustainability requirements. This is cost benefit analysis. At the macro level, many take the view that sustainability requires that national income measurement be modified so as to account for environmental damage. Such natural resource accounting is possible only if environmental damage is valued for incorporation into the economic accounts. The paper (...)
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  46. The Case Against bGH.Gary Comstock - 1988 - Agriculture and Human Values 5 (3):36-52.
    In the voluminous literature on the subject of bovine growth hormone (bGH) we have yet to find an attempt to frame the issue in specifically moral terms or to address systematically its ethical implications. I argue that there are two moral objections to the technology: its treatment of animals, and its dislocating effects on farmers. There are agricultural biotechnologies that deserve funding and support. bGH is not one of them.
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  47. Understanding Social Welfare Capitalism, Private Property, and the Government's Duty to Create a Sustainable Environment.Dennis R. Cooley - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (3):351-369.
    No one would deny that sustainability is necessary for individual, business, and national survival. How this goal is to be accomplished is a matter of great debate. In this article I will show that the United States and other developed countries have a duty to create sustainable cities, even if that is against a notion of private property rights considered as an absolute. Through eminent domain and regulation, developed countries can fulfill their obligations to current and future generations. To do (...)
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  48. Anthropocentric Biocentrism in a Hybrid.Daniel Coren - 2015 - Ethics and the Environment 20 (2):48-60.
    Anthropocentric biocentrism says that human beings ought to promote the survival of our own species above the survival of other species. But those who attack AB sometimes take it to say something much stronger: we ought to promote our species’ various desires, interests, and goals. I call the latter view AB+. I argue that AB and anti-AB+ are not only mutually compatible but in some respects mutually complementary, such that there are good prospects for combining them into a hybrid-view. After (...)
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  49. Assuring Sustainability of Ecological Economic Systems.Robert Costanza - 1991 - In Ecological Economics: The Science and Management of Sustainability. Columbia University Press. pp. 331--343.
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  50. Sustainable Agriculture in Michigan: Some Missing Dimensions. [REVIEW]Laura B. DeLind - 1991 - Agriculture and Human Values 8 (4):38-45.
    Michigan's approach to sustainability does not conflict with its efforts to reindustrialize state agriculture. As currently applied, agricultural sustainability remains a one-dimensional concept tightly focused on the condition of production resources and the larger physical environment. The social and political dimensions of sustainability, by contrast, are conspicuously absent. Using Michigan's ‘livestock initiative’ as a case in point, it is argued that this conceptualization conforms to and reinforces the reindustrialization of agriculture and the existing structure of power within the industry.
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