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  1. The Role of Necessity in Aristotles Teleology as Explained by Logical Implication.Giampaolo Abbate - 2012 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 15 (1):1-25.
  2. Intentionality, Social Play, and Definition.Colin Allen & Marc Bekoff - 1994 - Biology and Philosophy 9 (1):63-74.
    Social play is naturally characterized in intentional terms. An evolutionary account of social play could help scientists to understand the evolution of cognition and intentionality. Alexander Rosenberg (1990) has argued that if play is characterized intentionally or functionally, it is not a behavioral phenotype suitable for evolutionary explanation. If he is right, his arguments would threaten many projects in cognitive ethology. We argue that Rosenberg's arguments are unsound and that intentionally and functionally characterized phenotypes are a proper domain for ethological (...)
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  3. Nature's Purposes: Analyses of Function and Design in Biology.Colin Allen, Marc Bekoff & George V. Lauder (eds.) - 1998 - MIT Press.
  4. The Origin of Foresight.Martin Amsteus - 2012 - World Futures 68 (6):390 - 405.
    The purpose of this article is to develop a framework for the origin of foresight. Following a review of arguments for foresight as genetically inherited versus environmentally acquired, the understanding of foresight is expanded through a behaviorist perspective and through an evolutionary perspective. The framework established makes it possible to deploy evolutionary logic to explain foresight as well as to enhance our understanding of foresight, both on individual (e.g., managerial) and aggregated (e.g., organizational) levels.
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  5. ¿ Para qué sirve un ballestrinque? Reflexiones sobre el funcionamiento de artefactos y organismos en un mundo sin funciones.Sergio Balari & Guillermo Lorenzo - 2010 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 29 (3):57-76.
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  6. Eschatology Versus Teleology : The Suspended Dialogue Between Derrida and Althusser.Étienne Balibar - 2009 - In Pheng Cheah & Suzanne Guerlac (eds.), Derrida and the Time of the Political. Duke University Press.
  7. Representational and Realised Design: Problems for Analogies Between Organisms and Artifacts.Greg Bamford - 2010 - Copenhagen Working Papers on Design 2010 // No. 2.
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  8. Semantic Biology and the Mind?Body Problem: The Theory of the Conventional Mind.Marcello Barbieri - 2006 - Biological Theory 1 (4):352-356.
  9. Mechanistic Replacement of Purpose in Biology.Charles G. Bell - 1948 - Philosophy of Science 15 (1):47-51.
  10. The Missing Link Revisited: The Role of Teleology in Representing Legal Argument. [REVIEW]T. J. M. Bench-Capon - 2002 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 10 (1-3):79-94.
    In this paper I recapitulate the ideas of Berman and Hafner (1993) regarding the role of teleology in legal argument. I show how these ideas can be used to address some issues arising from more recent work on legal argument, and how this relates to ideas associated with the New Rhetoric of Perelman. I illustrate the points with a discussion of the classic problem of which vehicles should be allowed in parks.
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  11. Teleology and Spinoza's Conatus.Jonathan Bennett - 1983 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 8 (1):143-160.
  12. Epistemic Teleology and the Separateness of Propositions.Selim Berker - 2013 - Philosophical Review 122 (3):337-393.
    When it comes to epistemic normativity, should we take the good to be prior to the right? That is, should we ground facts about what we ought and ought not believe on a given occasion in facts about the value of being in certain cognitive states (such as, for example, the value of having true beliefs)? The overwhelming answer among contemporary epistemologists is “Yes, we should.” This essay argues to the contrary. Just as taking the good to be prior to (...)
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  13. The Mismeasure of Machine: Synthetic Biology and the Trouble with Engineering Metaphors.Maarten Boudry & Massimo Pigliucci - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (4):660-668.
    The scientific study of living organisms is permeated by machine and design metaphors. Genes are thought of as the ‘‘blueprint’’ of an organism, organisms are ‘‘reverse engineered’’ to discover their functionality, and living cells are compared to biochemical factories, complete with assembly lines, transport systems, messenger circuits, etc. Although the notion of design is indispensable to think about adaptations, and engineering analogies have considerable heuristic value (e.g., optimality assumptions), we argue they are limited in several important respects. In particular, the (...)
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  14. En Kropslig Kultur Historie - om omverdens relationen".Maria Brincker - 2012 - In E. O. Pedersen & A.-M. S. Christensen (eds.), Mennesket - En Introduktion Til Filosofisk Antropologi. Systime. pp. 197-216.
    This chapter deals with the way our psychology and actions a scaffolded by their environment but also the tensions that can appear between individual and environment, both at the level of biology and culture. The chapter is grounded in an analysis of the early 20th century theoretical biologist Jacob von Uexkull and his notion of "Umwelt" or "surround world". But also raises the question of whether organisms fit their environment as neatly as Uexkull and many later thinkers have proposed or (...)
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  15. É legítimo explicar em termos teleológicos na biologia?Ricardo Santos do Carmo, Nei Freitas Nunes-Neto & Charbel Niño El-Hani - 2012 - Revista da Biologia 9 (2):28-34.
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  16. The Proper Function of Artifacts: Intentions, Conventions and Causal Inferences.Sergio E. Chaigneau & Guillermo Puebla - 2013 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (3):391-406.
    Designers’ intentions are important for determining an artifact’s proper function (i.e., its perceived real function). However, there are disagreements regarding why. In one view, people reason causally about artifacts’ functional outcomes, and designers’ intended functions become important to the extent that they allow inferring outcomes. In another view, people use knowledge of designers’ intentions to determine proper functions, but this is unrelated to causal reasoning, having perhaps to do with intentional or social forms of reasoning (e.g., authority). Regarding these latter (...)
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  17. A Plea for the Plurality of Function.Tony Cheng - 2016 - Review of Contemporary Philosophy 15:70-81.
    In this paper I defend a pluralistic approach in understanding function, both in biological and other contexts. Talks about function are ubiquitous and crucial in biology, and it might be the key to bridge the “manifest image” and the “scientific image” identified by Sellars (1962). However, analysis of function has proven to be extremely difficult. The major puzzle is to make sense of “time-reversed causality”: how can property P be the cause of its realizer R? For example, “pumping blood” is (...)
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  18. Simulating Autonomous Anticipation: The Importance of Dubois' Conjecture.John Collier - unknown
    Anticipation allows a system to adapt to conditions that have not yet come to be, either externally to the system or internally. Autonomous systems actively control their own conditions so as to increase their functionality (they self-regulate). Living systems self-regulate in order to increase their own viability. These increasingly stronger conditions, anticipation, autonomy and viability, can give an insight into progressively stronger classes of models of autonomy. I will argue that stronger forms are the relevant ones for Artificial Life. This (...)
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  19. Structure, Function and Purpose.J. F. D. - 1958 - Review of Metaphysics 11 (4):695-695.
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  20. Closure, Function, Emergence, Semiosis and Life: The Same Idea?Claus Emmeche - manuscript
    In this note some epistemological problems in general theories about living systems are considered; in particular, the question of hidden connections between different areas of experience, such as folk biology and scientific biology, and hidden connections between central concepts of theoretical biology, such as function, semiosis, closure and life.
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  21. The Chicken and the Orphean Egg: On the Function of Meaning and the Meaning of Function.Claus Emmeche - 2002 - Σημιοτκή-Sign Systems Studies 1 (1):15-32.
    A central aspect of the relation between biosemiotics and biology is investigated by asking: Is a biological concept of function intrinsically related to a biosemiotic concept of sign action, and vice versa? A biological notion of function (as some process or part that serves some purpose in the context of maintenance and reproduction of the whole organism) is discussed in the light of the attempt to provide an understanding of life processes as being of a semiotic nature, i.e., constituted by (...)
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  22. The Hiddenness of Psychological Symptom Amplification: Some Historical Observations.Justin Garson - 2016 - In Daniel Moseley & Gary Gala (eds.), Philosophy and Psychiatry: Problems, Intersections, and New Perspectives. New York: Routledge. pp. 29-35.
    This book chapter is a short response to a paper by the psychiatrist Nicholas Kontos, on the phenomenon of psychological symptom amplification (PSA). PSA takes place when patients present symptoms to clinicians that they do not actually have, or, perhaps more commonly, they exaggerate symptoms they do have. Kontos argues that, because of modern medical training, it is very difficult for clinicians to recognize that the patient's presented symptoms are exaggerated or nonexistent. I argue that the hiddenness of PSA is (...)
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  23. Function and Teleology.Justin Garson - 2008 - In Anya Plutynski & Sahotra Sarkar (eds.), Companion to Philosophy of Biology. Malden, MA: Blackwell. pp. 525-549.
    This is a short overview of the biological functions debate in philosophy. While it was fairly comprehensive when it was written, my short book ​A Critical Overview of Biological Functions has largely supplanted it as a definitive and up-to-date overview of the debate, both because the book takes into account new developments since then, and because the length of the book allowed me to go into substantially more detail about existing views.
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  24. Book Review. Teleological Realism. Scott Sehon. [REVIEW]Carl Ginet - 2008 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (3):736–740.
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  25. Functions, Warrant, History.Peter J. Graham - 2014 - In Abrol Fairweather & Owen Flanagan (eds.), Naturalizing Epistemic Virtue. Cambridge University Press. pp. 15-35.
    I hold that epistemic warrant consists in the normal functioning of the belief-forming process when the process has forming true beliefs reliably as an etiological function. Evolution by natural selection is the central source of etiological functions. This leads many to think that on my view warrant requires a history of natural selection. What then about learning? What then about Swampman? Though functions require history, natural selection is not the only source. Self-repair and trial-and-error learning are both sources. Warrant requires (...)
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  26. Design Sans Adaptation.Sara Green, Arnon Levy & William Bechtel - 2015 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 5 (1):15-29.
    Design thinking in general, and optimality modeling in particular, have traditionally been associated with adaptationism—a research agenda that gives pride of place to natural selection in shaping biological characters. Our goal is to evaluate the role of design thinking in non-evolutionary analyses. Specifically, we focus on research into abstract design principles that underpin the functional organization of extant organisms. Drawing on case studies from engineering-inspired approaches in biology we show how optimality analysis, and other design-related methods, play a specific methodological (...)
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  27. The Sixth Meditation: Mind-Body Relation, External Objects, and Sense Perception.Gary Hatfield - 2009 - In Andreas Kemmerling (ed.), René Descartes: Meditationen über die erste Philosophie (Klassiker Auslegen 37). Akademie. pp. 123-146.
    Descartes entitled the Sixth Meditation "The existence of material things, and the real distinction between mind and body." But these topics take up only two paragraphs, about one-third of the way into the Sixth Meditation (which is the longest of the six). The other topics in the Meditation partly pertain to the cognitive faculties that a seeker after knowledge must employ: senses, imagination, and intellect. They also concern the mind–body relation: not only is it to be shown that mind and (...)
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  28. Teleological Explanation: A Species of Causal Explanation.D. Lynn Holt - 1988 - Philosophical Psychology 1 (3):313-325.
    Abstract The thesis that teleological explanations are best understood as causal explanations is defended (contra Valentine). I shift the focus of debate from behavior simpliciter to allegedly rational behavior. Teleological explanation, in the case of rational agents, involves reason?giving; and the reasons agents give for acting must be causative of that action if those agents are to be rational in practice. I argue initially that to abandon the claim that reasons are causes of action is to abandon that which renders (...)
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  29. Aristotle, Teleology, and Modern Psychology.George S. Howard - 1990 - Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 10 (1):31-38.
    After first discussing the symbiotic relationship between science and philosophy of science in mind, the author then presents a very selective glimpse of the path that science traversed from Aristotle and the ancients to the modern science of psychology. 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
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  30. EveryThing Else For Every Person.Decozua Jaliena - 2016 - Think 2 (none).
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  31. The Role of Teleology in the Moral Species.Steven J. Jensen - 2009 - Review of Metaphysics 63 (1):3-27.
  32. Rawls: Teleology or Perfect Procedural Justice.Alicia Juarrero - 1995 - Journal of Social Philosophy 26 (2):127-138.
  33. Slaves, Women, and Aristotle's Natural Teleology.Joseph Karbowski - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):323-350.
  34. On the Nature of the Subjectivity of Living Things.Yoshimi Kawade - 2009 - Biosemiotics 2 (2):205-220.
    A biosemiotic view of living things is presented that supersedes the mechanistic view of life prevalent in biology today. Living things are active agents with autonomous subjectivity, whose structure is triadic, consisting of the individual organism, its Umwelt and the society. Sociality inheres in every living thing since the very origin of life on the earth. The temporality of living things is guided by the purpose to live, which works as the semantic boundary condition for the processes of embodiment of (...)
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  35. Schopenhauer on the Individuation and Teleology of Intelligible Character.Edward Eugene Kleist - 2010 - Idealistic Studies 40 (1/2):15-26.
    A problem arises in Schopenhauer’s claim that each individual person’s will, or intelligible character, is timeless. The principium individuationis depends upon spatio-temporal determinations governing the world as representation. As individual, one’s individual character would seem to depend upon spatio-temporalconditions. Yet, Schopenhauer adopts the Kantian distinction between empirical character and intelligible character, with the individual’s intelligible characterremaining the timeless Ding-an-sich, or will. In response to this problem, I proceed in four stages. First, I examine why Schopenhauer appropriated the Kantiandistinction between intelligible (...)
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  36. Epoché and Teleology.Shojiro Kotegawa - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 19:41-48.
    In Husserl’s phenomenology, there are two essential moments; one is the Epoché which makes the phenomenology possible, the other is the teleology of science which directs it to its own goal (telos). The former, later appeared in Husserl’s text, does not seem quite consistent with the latter – on the contrary, theseseem so exclusive that a question arises as to whether Husserl could reconcile Epoché with teleology consistently claimed from the beginning of his career. My aim in this paper is (...)
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  37. Kant and Hegel on Teleology and Life From the Perspective of Debates About Free Will.James Kreines - forthcoming - In Thomas Khurana (ed.), THE FREEDOM OF LIFE. Hegelian Perspectives. Walther König.
    Kant’s treatment of teleology and life in the Critique of the Power of Judgment is complicated and difficult to interpret; Hegel’s response adds considerable complexity. I propose a new way of understanding the underlying philosophical issues in this debate, allowing a better understanding of the underlying structure of the arguments in Kant and Hegel. My new way is unusual: I use for an interpretive lens some structural features of familiar debates about freedom of the will. These debates, I argue, allow (...)
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  38. Theoreticians as Professional Outsiders: The Modeling Strategies of John von Neumann and Norbert Wiener.Ehud Lamm - 2013 - In Oren Harman & Michael Dietrich (eds.), Outsider Scientists: Routes to Innovation in Biology. Chicago University Press.
    Both von Neumann and Wiener were outsiders to biology. Both were inspired by biology and both proposed models and generalizations that proved inspirational for biologists. Around the same time in the 1940s von Neumann developed the notion of self reproducing automata and Wiener suggested an explication of teleology using the notion of negative feedback. These efforts were similar in spirit. Both von Neumann and Wiener used mathematical ideas to attack foundational issues in biology, and the concepts they articulated had lasting (...)
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  39. Egoism and Mortality in the Teleology of Thomas Aquinas.John Langan - 1991 - Journal of Philosophical Research 16:411-426.
    Aquinas holds that human actions are directed to a last end which is the supreme good and the complete satisfaction of the agent’s desires. He confronts serious difficulties in explaining how morally wrong or sinful choices and renunciatory acts are possible and in avoiding psychological egoism. The distinction that he makes between the concept of the last end as the fulfillment of desire and the object (God) in which that ful fillment is found enables him to alleviate these difficulties but (...)
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  40. Critique of Teleology in Kant and Dworkin: The Law Without Organs (Lwo).Alexandre Lefebvre - 2007 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 33 (2):179-201.
    Kant proposes a unique and necessary presupposition of our faculty of judgment. Empirical nature, together with its diverse laws, must be judged as if it were a coherent unity. In a teleological judgment, we add that nature must be judged as if it were purposively designed for our faculty of judgment. In this article, I argue that Kant's insights on reflective teleological judgment - the least commentedupon element of the Critical philosophy - are adopted by Dworkin towards a philosophy of (...)
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  41. Morality or "False Consciousness"? How Moral Naturalists Can Answer Thrasymachus's Challenge.Andres Luco - forthcoming - Journal of Philosophical Research 41.
    In Book I of Plato’s Republic, Thrasymachus famously maintains that ideas of morality and justice are nothing more than an ideology indoctrinated in “the weaker” to benefit “the stronger.” This is Thrasymachus’s challenge to morality: the thesis that some social arrangements, including some moral norms, are products of ‘false consciousness.’ False consciousness occurs when a dominant social group shapes the beliefs and desires of a subordinate group in such a way that the subordinates act for the benefit of the dominants, (...)
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  42. II. Taylor on the Reduction of Teleological Laws.Joseph Margolis - 1968 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 11 (1-4):118-124.
  43. On Dennis Des Chene's.Stephen Philip Menn - 2000 - Perspectives on Science 8 (2).
    : Dennis Des Chene's Physiologia: Natural Philosophy in Late Aristotelian and Cartesian Thought reconstructs the discourse of late scholastic natural philosophy, and assesses Descartes' agreements and disagreements. In a critical discussion, I offer a different interpretation of late scholastic theories of final causality and of God's concursus with created efficient causes. Fonseca's and Suárez' conceptions of final causality in nature depend on their claim that a single action can be the action of two agents at once--in particular, of God and (...)
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  44. Species-Being, Teleology and Individuality Part I: Marx on Species-Being.Stephen Mulhall - 1998 - Angelaki 3 (1):9 – 27.
  45. Species-Being, Teleology and Individuality Part II: Kant on Human Nature.Stephen Mulhall - 1998 - Angelaki 3 (1):49 – 58.
  46. Species-Being, Teleology and Individuality Part III: Alienation and Self-Realisation the Physiognomy of the Human.Stephen Mulhall - 1998 - Angelaki 3 (1):89 – 100.
    (1998). Species‐being, teleology and individuality part III: Alienation and self‐realisation the physiognomy of the human. Angelaki: Vol. 3, Impurity, authenticity and humanity, pp. 89-100.
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  47. Metaphysik des Mechanismus Im Teleologischen Idealismus.Gerhard Müller-Strahl - 2013 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 44 (1):127-152.
    In this study the notion of mechanistic entities is analyzed as it has been conceptualized by Hermann Lotze in his article Life. Vital Force (1842), the metaphysical foundation of which has recourse to his Metaphysik (1841) and Logik (1843). According to Lotze, explanations in the sciences are arguments which have a syntactic and a semantic structure—similar to that which became later known as the DN-model of explanation. The syntactic structure is delineated by ontological forms, the semantic by cosmological ones; the (...)
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  48. Review Symposium: The Fremdling of Teleology, Or: On Roger Smith's Being Human Roger Smith, Being Human: Historical Knowledge and the Creation of Human Nature. Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press, 2007. Viii + 288 Pp. ISBN 978-0-7190-7498-1. [REVIEW]Angus Nicholls - 2010 - History of the Human Sciences 23 (5):194-201.
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  49. G.W. Leibniz, Obiezioni contro la Teoria medica di Georg Ernst Stahl. Sui concetti di anima, vita, organismo.Antonio Nunziante - 2011 - Quodlibet.
    Le Obiezioni contro la Teoria medica di G.E. Stahl, tradotte per la prima volta in italiano, rappresentano un documento di particolare interesse storico-filosofico. Da una parte Georg Ernst Stahl (1659-1734), medico, chimico, fisico, sostenitore di una fisiologia corporea a impronta “vitalista” e dall’altra Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716), genio universale della matematica e della filosofia dell’età barocca. Il fulcro della polemica riguarda la possibilità di capire se e in che misura l’organizzazione meccanica di un corpo organico sia di per se sufficiente (...)
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  50. Teleology and Pragmatism: A Note.Roberts B. Owen - 1919 - Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 16 (18):487.
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