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  1. Testimonial Cultures: An Introduction.Sara Ahmed & Jackie Stacey - 2001 - Cultural Values 5 (1):1-6.
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  2. Ibn Sina in the Arab West: The Testimony of an Andalusian Sufi.Anna Akasoy - 2010 - Documenti E Studi Sulla Tradizione Filosofica Medievale 21:287-312.
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  3. On Judging Epistemic Credibility: Is Social Identity Relevant?Linda Martin Alcoff - 2000 - In Naomi Zack (ed.), On Judging Epistemic Credibility: Is Social Identity Relevant? Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 235-262.
  4. Explanationism All the Way Down.Ronald J. Allen - 2008 - Episteme 5 (3):pp. 320-328.
    The probabilistic account of juridical proof meets insurmountable problems. A better explanation of juridical proof is that it is a form of inference to the best explanation that involves the comparative plausibility of the parties’ stories. In addition, discrete evidentiary matters such as relevance and probative value are also best understood as involving inference to the best explanation rather than being probabilistic.
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  5. The ‘Do It Yourself’ Paradigm: An Inquiry Into the Historical Roots of the Neglect of Testimony.Emmanuel Alloa - 2017 - Early Science and Medicine 22 (4):333-360.
    In contemporary social epistemology, the claim has been made that there is a traditional “neglect of testimonial knowledge,” and that in the history of epistemology, first-hand self-knowledge was invariably prioritised over secondary knowledge. While this paper acknowledges some truth in these statements, it challenges the given explanations: the mentioned neglect of testimonial knowledge is based not so much on a primacy of self-knowledge, but that of self-agency. This article retraces some crucial chapters of this ‘do-it-yourself’ paradigm: it considers the imperative (...)
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  6. Trust in Expert Testimony: Eddington's 1919 Eclipse Expedition and the British Response to General Relativity.Ben Almassi - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 40 (1):57-67.
  7. The Ethics of Expert Testimony.Louise B. Andrew - 2010 - In G. A. van Norman, S. Jackson, S. H. Rosenbaum & S. K. Palmer (eds.), Clinical Ethics in Anesthesiology. Cambridge University Press. pp. 261.
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  8. Imwinkelried's Argument for Normative Ethical Testimony.David W. Barnes - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (2):234-241.
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  9. Expert Testimony by Persons Trained in Ethical Reasoning: The Case of Andrew Sawatzky.Françoise Baylis - 2000 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (3):224-231.
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  10. Rebuttal: Expert Ethics Testimony.Françoise Baylis - 2000 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (3):240-242.
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  11. “Rhetorical Criticism, Holocaust Studies, and the Problem of Ethos” (A Reply to “Ethos, Witness, and Holocaust ‘Testimony’”].David E. Beard - 2000 - JAC 20 20:949-956.
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  12. The Epistemology of Prejudice.Endre Begby - 2013 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 2 (1):90-99.
    According to a common view, prejudice always involves some form of epistemic culpability, i.e., a failure to respond to evidence in the appropriate way. I argue that the common view wrongfully assumes that prejudices always involve universal generalizations. After motivating the more plausible thesis that prejudices typically involve a species of generic judgment, I show that standard examples provide no grounds for positing a strong connection between prejudice and epistemic culpability. More generally, the common view fails to recognize the extent (...)
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  13. Is Epistemic Trust of Veritistic Value?Gregor Betz, Michael Baurmann & Rainer Cramm - 2013 - Ethics and Politics 15 (2):25-41.
    Epistemic trust figures prominently in our socio-cognitive practices. By assigning different degrees of competence to agents, we distinguish between experts and novices and determine the trustworthiness of testimony. This paper probes the claim that epistemic trust furthers our epistemic enterprise. More specifically, it assesses the veritistic value of competence attribution in an epistemic community, i.e., in a group of agents that collaboratively seek to track down the truth. The results, obtained by simulating opinion dynamics, tend to subvert the very idea (...)
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  14. The Philosophy of Existence. The Testimony of the Ages.Anna Blackwell - 1871
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  15. The Instant of My Death / Demeure: Fiction and Testimony.Maurice Blanchot & Jacques Derrida - 2000 - Stanford University Press.
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  16. Eyewitness Accuracy: A General Observational Skill?Robert Boice, C. Patricia Hanley, Peter Shaughnessy & David Gansler - 1982 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 20 (4):193-195.
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  17. Truth, Knowledge and Communication: Thomas Aquinas on the Mystery of Teaching.V. Boland - 2006 - Studies in Christian Ethics 19 (3):287-304.
    The context in which Thomas Aquinas reflects on teaching is discussed, as are the texts in which he does so. We learn how he understands teaching from two other considerations, how he went about the task, and the pedagogical concerns that persist through his writing career. The most important source for his convictions about pedagogy is the Bible, and Jesus is ‘the most excellent of teachers’. His account of teaching is ultimately theological, then, in line with his concerns in Summa (...)
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  18. Epistemically Pernicious Groups and the Groupstrapping Problem.Kenneth Boyd - forthcoming - Social Epistemology:1-13.
    Recently, there has been growing concern that increased partisanship in news sources, as well as new ways in which people acquire information, has led to a proliferation of epistemic bubbles and echo chambers: in the former, one tends to acquire information from a limited range of sources, ones that generally support the kinds of beliefs that one already has, while the latter function in the same way, but possess the additional characteristic that certain beliefs are actively reinforced. Here I argue, (...)
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  19. Testimony and Intersubjectivity.Joseph A. Bracken - 1987 - Philosophy and Theology 2 (1):35-43.
    Following a brief examination of some remarks by Paul Ricoeur on the notion of testimony. I provide the outline or an analysis of revelation based upon certain key concepts of process philosophy. This is followed by a more specific interpretation within the context of Whitehead’s philosophy of process.
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  20. Chapter 7. The Peace Testimony of the Early American Moravians: An Ambiguous Witness.Peter Brock - 1969 - In Pacifism in the United States: From the Colonial Era to the First World War. Princeton University Press. pp. 285-330.
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  21. Chapter 8. The Quaker Peace Testimony, 1783-1861.Peter Brock - 1969 - In Pacifism in the United States: From the Colonial Era to the First World War. Princeton University Press. pp. 333-388.
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  22. Chapter 21. The Quaker Peace Testimony, 1865-1914.Peter Brock - 1969 - In Pacifism in the United States: From the Colonial Era to the First World War. Princeton University Press. pp. 869-888.
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  23. The Poetics of Testimony and Blackness in the Theology of James H. Cone.James Bryant - 2004 - Clr James Journal 10 (1):37-56.
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  24. Narrative Testimony in Kierkegaard and Rowling.William D. Buhrman - 2011 - Renascence 63 (4):273-286.
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  25. Differences in Actual Persuasiveness Between Experiential and Professional Expert Evidence.Christian Burgers, Anneke de Graaf & Sabine Callaars - 2012 - Journal of Argumentation in Context 1 (2):194-208.
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  26. Testing Testimony: Toxicology and the Law of Evidence in Early Nineteenth-Century England.Ian A. Burney - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (2):289-314.
    This essay’s principal objective is to examine how, when confronted with a case of possible criminal poisoning, early nineteenth-century English toxicologists sought to generate and to represent their evidence in the courtroom. Its contention is that in both these activities toxicologists were inextricably engaged in a complex communicative exercise. On the one hand, they distanced themselves from the instabilities of language, styling themselves as testifiers to fact alone. But at the same time, they saw themselves as deeply implicated in the (...)
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  27. ""A" Truer" History. Reflections on Richard Bauckham, Jesus and the Eyewitnesses: The Gospels as Eyewitness Testimony.Samuel Byrskog - 2008 - Nova et Vetera 6:483-490.
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  28. Reading Hurricane Katrina: Information Sources and Decision-Making in Response to a Natural Disaster.Kenneth Campbell, Stephen Banning, Hilary Fussell Sisco, Susanna Priest & Karen Taylor - 2009 - Social Epistemology 23 (3):361-380.
    In this paper we analyze results from 114 face-to-face qualitative interviews of people who had evacuated from the New Orleans area in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, interviews that were completed within weeks of the 2005 storm in most cases. Our goal was to understand the role information and knowledge played in people's decisions to leave the area. Contrary to the conventional wisdom underlying many disaster communication studies, we found that our interviewees almost always had extensive storm-related information from a (...)
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  29. Misrecognition and Knowledge.James G. Carrier - 1979 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 22 (1-4):321 – 342.
    Explanation and knowledge have traditionally been guided by and judged in terms of the ideal of the neutral reflection of reality. Kuhn's work on the sciences, and Bourdieu's and Kenneth Burke's discussions of knowledge and society, suggest that this ideal and the implicit epistemology that goes with it are in error. Their writings suggest instead that such an ideal masks the inadequacy of its own implicit epistemology by misrecognizing the effects of that inadequacy. That is, their writings suggest a sort (...)
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  30. On Testimony and Transmission.J. Adam Carter & Philip J. Nickel - 2014 - Episteme 11 (2):145-155.
    Jennifer Lackey’s case “Creationist Teacher,” in which students acquire knowledge of evolutionary theory from a teacher who does not herself believe the theory, has been discussed widely as a counterexample to so-called transmission theories of testimonial knowledge and justification. The case purports to show that a speaker need not herself have knowledge or justification in order to enable listeners to acquire knowledge or justification from her assertion. The original case has been criticized on the ground that it does not really (...)
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  31. Implicit Trust in the Space of Reasons and Implications for Technology Design: A Response to Justine Pila.Annamaria Carusi - 2009 - Social Epistemology 23 (1):25-43.
    In this issue, Pila (2009) has criticised the recommendations made by requirements engineers involved in the design of a grid technology for the support of distributed readings of mammograms made by Jirotka et al. (2005). The disagreement between them turns on the notion of “biographical familiarity” and whether it can be a sound basis for trust for the performances of professionals such as radiologists. In the first two sections, this paper gives an interpretation of the position of each side in (...)
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  32. Intellectualism and Testimony.Yuri Cath - 2017 - Analysis 77 (2):1-9.
    Knowledge-how often appears to be more difficult to transmit by testimony than knowledge-that and knowledge-wh. Some philosophers have argued that this difference provides us with an important objection to intellectualism—the view that knowledge-how is a species of knowledge-that. This article defends intellectualism against these testimony-based objections.
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  33. The Trouble with Being Sincere.Timothy Chan & Guy Kahane - 2011 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (2):215-234.
    Questions about sincerity play a central role in our lives. But what makes an assertion insincere? In this paper we argue that the answer to this question is not as straightforward as it has sometimes been taken to be. Until recently the dominant answer has been that a speaker makes an insincere assertion if and only if he does not believe the proposition asserted. There are, however, persuasive counterexamples to this simple account. It has been proposed instead that an insincere (...)
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  34. Testimony: A Philosophical Study.C. A. J. Coady - 1992 - Oxford University Press.
    Our trust in the word of others is often dismissed as unworthy, because the illusory ideal of "autonomous knowledge" has prevailed in the debate about the nature of knowledge. Yet we are profoundly dependent on others for a vast amount of what any of us claim to know. Coady explores the nature of testimony in order to show how it might be justified as a source of knowledge, and uses the insights that he has developed to challenge certain widespread assumptions (...)
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  35. A Critical Introduction to Testimony, by Axel Gelfert.David Coady - 2016 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 94 (4):837-838.
  36. Are Conspiracy Theorists Irrational?David Coady - 2007 - Episteme 4 (2):193-204.
    Abstract It is widely believed that to be a conspiracy theorist is to suffer from a form of irrationality. After considering the merits and defects of a variety of accounts of what it is to be a conspiracy theorist, I draw three conclusions. One, on the best definitions of what it is to be a conspiracy theorist, conspiracy theorists do not deserve their reputation for irrationality. Two, there may be occasions on which we should settle for an inferior definition which (...)
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  37. Introduction: Conspiracy Theories.David Coady - 2007 - Episteme 4 (2):131-134.
    There has been a lively philosophical debate about the nature of conspiracy theories and their epistemic status going on for some years now. This debate has shed light, not only on conspiracy theories themselves, but also, in the process, on a variety of issues in social epistemology, political philosophy, and the philosophy of religion.
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  38. II—Roger Crisp: Moral Testimony Pessimism: A Defence.Roger Crisp - 2014 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 88 (1):129-143.
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  39. Commentary: Trauma and Testimony: Between Law and Discipline.Veena Das - 2007 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 35 (3):330-335.
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  40. Commentary: Trauma and Testimony: Between Law and Discipline.Veena Das - 2007 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 35 (3):330-335.
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  41. Argument From Expert Opinion as Legal Evidence: Critical Questions and Admissibility Criteria of Expert Testimony in the American Legal System.Douglas Walton David M. Godden - 2006 - Ratio Juris 19 (3):261-286.
    . While courts depend on expert opinions in reaching sound judgments, the role of the expert witness in legal proceedings is associated with a litany of problems. Perhaps most prevalent is the question of under what circumstances should testimony be admitted as expert opinion. We review the changing policies adopted by American courts in an attempt to ensure the reliability and usefulness of the scientific and technical information admitted as evidence. We argue that these admissibility criteria are best seen in (...)
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  42. The Influence of the Wording of Interrogatives on the Accuracy of Eyewitness Recollections.Janet Davis & H. R. Schiffman - 1985 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 23 (4):394-396.
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  43. The Epistemology of Religious Testimony.Boudewijn de Bruin - 2013 - Philo 16 (1):95-111.
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  44. Survivor or Expert? Some Thoughts on Being Both.Gill de la Cour - 2002 - In K. W. M. Fulford, Donna Dickenson & Thomas H. Murray (eds.), Healthcare Ethics and Human Values: An Introductory Text with Readings and Case Studies. Blackwell.
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  45. On the Politico-Clinical Function of Testimony.Rodrigo de la Fabian - 2011 - Filozofski Vestnik 32 (2).
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  46. The Political Function of Clinical Testimony.Rodrigo de la Fabian - 2011 - Filozofski Vestnik 32 (2):115 - +.
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  47. The Epistemic Value of Expert Autonomy.Finnur Dellsén - forthcoming - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
    According to an influential Enlightenment ideal, one shouldn't rely epistemically on other people's say-so, at least not if one is in a position to evaluate the relevant evidence for oneself. However, in much recent work in social epistemology, we are urged to dispense with this ideal, which is seen as stemming from a misguided focus on isolated individuals to the exclusion of groups and communities. In this paper, I argue that that an emphasis on the social nature of inquiry should (...)
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  48. Reverse Engineering Epistemic Evaluations.Sinan Dogramaci - 2012 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 84 (3):513-530.
    This paper begins by raising a puzzle about what function our use of the word ‘rational’ could serve. To solve the puzzle, I introduce a view I call Epistemic Communism: we use epistemic evaluations to promote coordination among our basic belief-forming rules, and the function of this is to make the acquisition of knowledge by testimony more efficient.
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  49. Argument From Personal Narrative: A Case Study of Rachel Moran's 'Paid For: My Journey Through Prostitution'.Katherine Dormandy - 2016 - Res Philosophica 93 (3):601-620.
    Personal narratives can let us in on aspects of reality which we have not experienced for ourselves, and are thus important sources for philosophical reflection. Yet a venerable tradition in mainstream philosophy has little room for arguments which rely on personal narrative, on the grounds that narratives are particular and testimonial, whereas philosophical arguments should be systematic and transparent. I argue that narrative arguments are an important form of philosophical argument. Their testimonial aspects witness to novel facets of reality, but (...)
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  50. Trust and New Communication Technologies: Vicious Circles, Virtuous Circles, Possible Futures. [REVIEW]Charles M. Ess - 2010 - Knowledge, Technology & Policy 23 (3-4):287-305.
    I approach the philosophical analyses of the phenomenon of trust vis-à-vis online communication beginning with an overview from within the framework of computer-mediated communication of concerns and paradigmatic failures of trust in the history of online communication. I turn to the more directly philosophical analyses of trust online by first offering an introductory taxonomy of diverse accounts of trust that have emerged over the past decade or so. In the face of important objections to the possibility of establishing and fostering (...)
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