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  1. Philosophy of Mind Is (in Part) Philosophy of Computer Science.Darren Abramson - 2011 - Minds and Machines 21 (2):203-219.
    In this paper I argue that whether or not a computer can be built that passes the Turing test is a central question in the philosophy of mind. Then I show that the possibility of building such a computer depends on open questions in the philosophy of computer science: the physical Church-Turing thesis and the extended Church-Turing thesis. I use the link between the issues identified in philosophy of mind and philosophy of computer science to respond to a prominent argument (...)
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  2. The Abductive Loop: Tracking Irrational Sets. [REVIEW]Addis Tom, Addis Jan Townsend, Billinge Dave, Gooding David & Visscher Bart-Floris - 2008 - Foundations of Science 13 (1):5-16.
    We argue from the Church-Turing thesis (Kleene Mathematical logic. New York: Wiley 1967) that a program can be considered as equivalent to a formal language similar to predicate calculus where predicates can be taken as functions. We can relate such a calculus to Wittgenstein’s first major work, the Tractatus, and use the Tractatus and its theses as a model of the formal classical definition of a computer program. However, Wittgenstein found flaws in his initial great work and he explored these (...)
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  3. Ingenio E Industria. Guía de Referencia Sobre la Tesis de Turing-Church (Inventiveness and Skili. Reference Guide on Church-Turing Thesis).Enrique Alonso - 1999 - Theoria 14 (2):249-273.
    La Teoría de la Computación es un campo especialmente rico para la indagación filosófica. EI debate sobre el mecanicismo y la discusión en torno a los fundamentos de la matemática son tópicos que estan directamente asociados a la Teoria de la Computación desde su misma creación como disciplina independiente. La Tesis de Turing-Church constituye uno de los resultados mas característicos en este campo estando, además, lleno de consecuencias filosóficas. En este ensayo se ofrece una guía de referencia útil a aquellos (...)
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  4. Some Notes on Church's Thesis and the Theory of Games.Luca Anderlini - 1990 - Theory and Decision 29 (1):19-52.
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  5. Review of Computability: Turing, Gödel, Church, and Beyond. [REVIEW]Andrew Arana - 2015 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 3 (20).
    A review of Computability: Turing, Gödel, Church, and Beyond by Copeland, Posy and Shagrir.
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  6. Thesis Eleven – 25 Years On.Peter Beilharz - 2006 - Thesis Eleven 85 (1):6-7.
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  7. Church's Thesis Misconstrued.Jonathan Berg & Charles Chihara - 1975 - Philosophical Studies 28 (5):357 - 362.
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  8. Proving Church's Thesis.Robert Black - 2000 - Philosophia Mathematica 8 (3):244--58.
    Arguments to the effect that Church's thesis is intrinsically unprovable because proof cannot relate an informal, intuitive concept to a mathematically defined one are unconvincing, since other 'theses' of this kind have indeed been proved, and Church's thesis has been proved in one direction. However, though evidence for the truth of the thesis in the other direction is overwhelming, it does not yet amount to proof.
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  9. An Argument Against Church's Thesis.G. Lee Bowie - 1973 - Journal of Philosophy 70 (3):66-76.
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  10. Church's Thesis and Bishop's Constructivism.Douglas S. Bridges - 2006 - In A. Olszewski, J. Wole'nski & R. Janusz (eds.), Church's Thesis After Seventy Years. Ontos Verlag. pp. 1--58.
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  11. In Defense of the Unprovability of the Church-Turing Thesis.Selmer Bringsjord - unknown
    One of us has previously argued that the Church-Turing Thesis (CTT), contra Elliot Mendelson, is not provable, and is — light of the mind’s capacity for effortless hypercomputation — moreover false (e.g., [13]). But a new, more serious challenge has appeared on the scene: an attempt by Smith [28] to prove CTT. His case is a clever “squeezing argument” that makes crucial use of Kolmogorov-Uspenskii (KU) machines. The plan for the present paper is as follows. After covering some necessary preliminaries (...)
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  12. On the Provability, Veracity, and AI-Relevance of the Church-Turing Thesis.Selmer Bringsjord & Konstantine Arkoudas - 2006 - In A. Olszewski, J. Wole'nski & R. Janusz (eds.), Church's Thesis After Seventy Years. Ontos Verlag. pp. 68-118.
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  13. Hyperloops Do Not Threaten the Notion of an Effective Procedure.Tim Button - 2009 - Lecture Notes in Computer Science 5635:68-78.
    This paper develops my (BJPS 2009) criticisms of the philosophical significance of a certain sort of infinitary computational process, a hyperloop. I start by considering whether hyperloops suggest that "effectively computable" is vague (in some sense). I then consider and criticise two arguments by Hogarth, who maintains that hyperloops undermine the very idea of effective computability. I conclude that hyperloops, on their own, cannot threaten the notion of an effective procedure.
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  14. SAD Computers and Two Versions of the Church–Turing Thesis.Tim Button - 2009 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 60 (4):765-792.
    Recent work on hypercomputation has raised new objections against the Church–Turing Thesis. In this paper, I focus on the challenge posed by a particular kind of hypercomputer, namely, SAD computers. I first consider deterministic and probabilistic barriers to the physical possibility of SAD computation. These suggest several ways to defend a Physical version of the Church–Turing Thesis. I then argue against Hogarth's analogy between non-Turing computability and non-Euclidean geometry, showing that it is a non-sequitur. I conclude that the Effective version (...)
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  15. A Note on Ramsey Theorems and Turing Jumps.Lorenzo Carlucci & Konrad Zdanowski - 2012 - In S. Barry Cooper (ed.), How the World Computes. pp. 89--95.
  16. The Church and Usury. Thesis, St. Patrick's Coll., Maynooth.Patrick Cleary - 1914
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  17. The Church-Turing Thesis: A Last Vestige of a Failed Mathematical Program.Carol Cleland - 2006 - In A. Olszewski, J. Wole'nski & R. Janusz (eds.), Church's Thesis After Seventy Years. Ontos Verlag. pp. 119-146.
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  18. Effective Procedures and Computable Functions.Carol E. Cleland - 1995 - Minds and Machines 5 (1):9-23.
    Horsten and Roelants have raised a number of important questions about my analysis of effective procedures and my evaluation of the Church-Turing thesis. They suggest that, on my account, effective procedures cannot enter the mathematical world because they have a built-in component of causality, and, hence, that my arguments against the Church-Turing thesis miss the mark. Unfortunately, however, their reasoning is based upon a number of misunderstandings. Effective mundane procedures do not, on my view, provide an analysis of ourgeneral concept (...)
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  19. Is the Church-Turing Thesis True?Carol E. Cleland - 1993 - Minds and Machines 3 (3):283-312.
    The Church-Turing thesis makes a bold claim about the theoretical limits to computation. It is based upon independent analyses of the general notion of an effective procedure proposed by Alan Turing and Alonzo Church in the 1930''s. As originally construed, the thesis applied only to the number theoretic functions; it amounted to the claim that there were no number theoretic functions which couldn''t be computed by a Turing machine but could be computed by means of some other kind of effective (...)
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  20. B. Jack Copeland, Carl J. Posy, and Oron Shagrir, Eds, Computability: Turing, Gödel, Church, and Beyond. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2013. ISBN 978-0-262-01899-9. Pp. X + 362. [REVIEW]Roy T. Cook - 2014 - Philosophia Mathematica 22 (3):412-413.
  21. Computability: Gödel, Turing, Church, and Beyond.B. J. Copeland, C. Posy & O. Shagrir (eds.) - forthcoming - MIT Press.
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  22. The Church-Turing Thesis.B. Jack Copeland - 2008 - In Edward N. Zalta (ed.), The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. The Metaphysics Research Lab, Stanford University.
    There are various equivalent formulations of the Church-Turing thesis. A common one is that every effective computation can be carried out by a Turing machine. The Church-Turing thesis is often misunderstood, particularly in recent writing in the philosophy of mind.
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  23. Physical Computation: How General Are Gandy's Principles for Mechanisms?B. Jack Copeland & Oron Shagrir - 2007 - Minds and Machines 17 (2):217-231.
    What are the limits of physical computation? In his ‘Church’s Thesis and Principles for Mechanisms’, Turing’s student Robin Gandy proved that any machine satisfying four idealised physical ‘principles’ is equivalent to some Turing machine. Gandy’s four principles in effect define a class of computing machines (‘Gandy machines’). Our question is: What is the relationship of this class to the class of all (ideal) physical computing machines? Gandy himself suggests that the relationship is identity. We do not share this view. We (...)
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  24. The Broad Conception of Computation.Jack Copeland - 1997 - American Behavioral Scientist 40 (6):690-716.
    A myth has arisen concerning Turing's paper of 1936, namely that Turing set forth a fundamental principle concerning the limits of what can be computed by machine - a myth that has passed into cognitive science and the philosophy of mind, to wide and pernicious effect. This supposed principle, sometimes incorrectly termed the 'Church-Turing thesis', is the claim that the class of functions that can be computed by machines is identical to the class of functions that can be computed by (...)
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  25. On the Interpretation of Church's Thesis.P. Cotogno - 1992 - Epistemologia 15 (2):315-350.
    Church's Thesis states the equivalence of computable functions and recursive functions. This can be interpreted as a definition, as an explanation, as an axiom, and as a proposition of mechanistic philosophy. A number of arguments and objections, including a pair of counterexamples based on Gödel's Incompleteness Theorem, allow to conclude that Church's Thesis can be reasonably taken both as a definition and as an axiom, somewhat less convincingly as an explanation, but hardly as a mechanistic proposition.
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  26. Hypercomputation and the Physical Church-Turing Thesis.Paolo Cotogno - 2003 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54 (2):181-223.
    A version of the Church-Turing Thesis states that every effectively realizable physical system can be defined by Turing Machines (‘Thesis P’); in this formulation the Thesis appears an empirical, more than a logico-mathematical, proposition. We review the main approaches to computation beyond Turing definability (‘hypercomputation’): supertask, non-well-founded, analog, quantum, and retrocausal computation. These models depend on infinite computation, explicitly or implicitly, and appear physically implausible; moreover, even if infinite computation were realizable, the Halting Problem would not be affected. Therefore, Thesis (...)
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  27. A Note on the Theorems of Church‐Turing and Trachtenbrot.Michael Deutsch - 1994 - Mathematical Logic Quarterly 40 (3):422-424.
    We sketch proofs of the theorems of Church-Turing and Trachtenbrot using a semi-monomorphic axiomatization.
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  28. Explaining Experience In Nature: The Foundations Of Logic And Apprehension.Steven Ericsson-Zenith - forthcoming - Institute for Advanced Science & Engineering.
    At its core this book is concerned with logic and computation with respect to the mathematical characterization of sentient biophysical structure and its behavior. -/- Three related theories are presented: The first of these provides an explanation of how sentient individuals come to be in the world. The second describes how these individuals operate. And the third proposes a method for reasoning about the behavior of individuals in groups. -/- These theories are based upon a new explanation of experience in (...)
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  29. Non-Turing Computations Via Malament-Hogarth Space-Times.Gábor Etesi & István Németi - 2002 - International Journal of Theoretical Physics 41:341--70.
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  30. Carnap, Turing and Wittgenstein : Contrasting Notions of Analysis.Juliet Floyd - 2012 - In Pierre Wagner (ed.), Carnap's Ideal of Explication and Naturalism. Palgrave-Macmillan.
  31. Church’s Thesis and the Variety of Mathematical Justifications.Janet Folina - unknown
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  32. Church's Thesis: Prelude to a Proof.Janet Folina - 1998 - Philosophia Mathematica 6 (3):302-323.
  33. An Analysis of the Criteria for Evaluating Adequate Theories of Computation.Nir Fresco - 2008 - Minds and Machines 18 (3):379-401.
    This paper deals with the question: What are the criteria that an adequate theory of computation has to meet? 1. Smith's answer: it has to meet the empirical criterion (i.e. doing justice to computational practice), the conceptual criterion (i.e. explaining all the underlying concepts) and the cognitive criterion (i.e. providing solid grounds for computationalism). 2. Piccinini's answer: it has to meet the objectivity criterion (i.e. identifying computation as a matter of fact), the explanation criterion (i.e. explaining the computer's behaviour), the (...)
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  34. The Church-Turing Thesis: Its Nature and Status.Antony Galton - 1996 - In P. J. R. Millican & A. Clark (eds.), Machines and Thought: The Legacy of Alan Turing, Volume 1. Clarendon Press.
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  35. Church's Thesis and Principles for Mechanisms.Robin Gandy - 1980 - In The Kleene Symposium. North-Holland. pp. 123--148.
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  36. The Interactive Nature of Computing: Refuting the Strong Church–Turing Thesis. [REVIEW]Dina Goldin & Peter Wegner - 2008 - Minds and Machines 18 (1):17-38.
    The classical view of computing positions computation as a closed-box transformation of inputs (rational numbers or finite strings) to outputs. According to the interactive view of computing, computation is an ongoing interactive process rather than a function-based transformation of an input to an output. Specifically, communication with the outside world happens during the computation, not before or after it. This approach radically changes our understanding of what is computation and how it is modeled. The acceptance of interaction as a new (...)
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  37. What is an Algorithm.Yuri Gurevich - 2012 - Lecture Notes in Computer Science.
  38. Quantum Computing.Amit Hagar & Michael Cuffaro - 2015 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Combining physics, mathematics and computer science, quantum computing has developed in the past two decades from a visionary idea to one of the most fascinating areas of quantum mechanics. The recent excitement in this lively and speculative domain of research was triggered by Peter Shor (1994) who showed how a quantum algorithm could exponentially "speed up" classical computation and factor large numbers into primes much more rapidly (at least in terms of the number of computational steps involved) than any known (...)
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  39. Counting Steps: A Finitist Interpretation of Objective Probability in Physics.Amit Hagar & Giuseppe Sergioli - 2015 - Epistemologia 37 (2):262-275.
    We propose a new interpretation of objective deterministic chances in statistical physics based on physical computational complexity. This notion applies to a single physical system (be it an experimental set--up in the lab, or a subsystem of the universe), and quantifies (1) the difficulty to realize a physical state given another, (2) the 'distance' (in terms of physical resources) from a physical state to another, and (3) the size of the set of time--complexity functions that are compatible with the physical (...)
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  40. Church's Thesis as an Empirical Hypothesis.Sven Ove Hansson - 1985 - International Logic Review 16:96-101.
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  41. Computers Don't Follow Instructions.Stevan Harnad - unknown
    Harnad accepts the picture of computation as formalism, so that any implementation of a program - thats any implementation - is as good as any other; in fact, in considering claims about the properties of computations, the nature of the implementing system - the interpreter - is invisible. Let me refer to this idea as 'Computationalism'. Almost all the criticism, claimed refutation by Searle's argument, and sharp contrasting of this idea with others, rests on the absoluteness of this separation between (...)
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  42. Formalizing Church's Thesis.Leon Horsten - 2006 - In A. Olszewski, J. Wole'nski & R. Janusz (eds.), Church's Thesis After Seventy Years. Ontos Verlag. pp. 1--253.
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  43. The Church-Turing Thesis and Effective Mundane Procedures.Leon Horsten - 1995 - Minds and Machines 5 (1):1-8.
    We critically discuss Cleland''s analysis of effective procedures as mundane effective procedures. She argues that Turing machines cannot carry out mundane procedures, since Turing machines are abstract entities and therefore cannot generate the causal processes that are generated by mundane procedures. We argue that if Turing machines cannot enter the physical world, then it is hard to see how Cleland''s mundane procedures can enter the world of numbers. Hence her arguments against versions of the Church-Turing thesis for number theoretic functions (...)
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  44. Reflections on Gödel's and Gandy's Reflections on Turing's Thesis.David Israel - 2002 - Minds and Machines 12 (2):181-201.
    We sketch the historical and conceptual context of Turing's analysis of algorithmic or mechanical computation. We then discuss two responses to that analysis, by Gödel and by Gandy, both of which raise, though in very different ways. The possibility of computation procedures that cannot be reduced to the basic procedures into which Turing decomposed computation. Along the way, we touch on some of Cleland's views.
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  45. An Argument Against the Plausibility of Church's Thesis.László Kalmár - 1957 - In A. Heyting (ed.), ¸ Iteheyting:Cim. Amsterdam: North-Holland Pub. Co.. pp. 72--80.
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  46. Thinking Machines: Some Fundamental Confusions. [REVIEW]John T. Kearns - 1997 - Minds and Machines 7 (2):269-87.
    This paper explores Church's Thesis and related claims madeby Turing. Church's Thesis concerns computable numerical functions, whileTuring's claims concern both procedures for manipulating uninterpreted marksand machines that generate the results that these procedures would yield. Itis argued that Turing's claims are true, and that they support (the truth of)Church's Thesis. It is further argued that the truth of Turing's and Church'sTheses has no interesting consequences for human cognition or cognitiveabilities. The Theses don't even mean that computers can do as much (...)
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  47. Remarks on Church's Thesis and GOdel's Theorem.Stanisław Krajewski - 2006 - In A. Olszewski, J. Wole'nski & R. Janusz (eds.), Church's Thesis After Seventy Years. Ontos Verlag. pp. 1--269.
  48. The Church-Turing ‘Thesis’ as a Special Corollary of Gödel’s Completeness Theorem.Saul A. Kripke - 2013 - In B. J. Copeland, C. Posy & O. Shagrir (eds.), Computability: Turing, Gödel, Church, and Beyond. MIT Press.
    Traditionally, many writers, following Kleene (1952), thought of the Church-Turing thesis as unprovable by its nature but having various strong arguments in its favor, including Turing’s analysis of human computation. More recently, the beauty, power, and obvious fundamental importance of this analysis, what Turing (1936) calls “argument I,” has led some writers to give an almost exclusive emphasis on this argument as the unique justification for the Church-Turing thesis. In this chapter I advocate an alternative justification, essentially presupposed by Turing (...)
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  49. Closing the Circle: An Analysis of Emil Post's Early Work.Liesbeth De Mol - 2006 - Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 12 (2):267 - 289.
    In 1931 Kurt Gödel published his incompleteness results, and some years later Church and Turing showed that the decision problem for certain systems of symbolic logic has a negative solution. However, already in 1921 the young logician Emil Post worked on similar problems which resulted in what he called an "anticipation" of these results. For several reasons though he did not submit these results to a journal until 1941. This failure 'to be the first', did not discourage him: his contributions (...)
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  50. What is a Digital State?Vincent C. Müller - 2013 - In Mark J. Bishop & Yasemin Erden (eds.), The Scandal of Computation - What is Computation? - AISB Convention 2013. AISB. pp. 11-16.
    There is much discussion about whether the human mind is a computer, whether the human brain could be emulated on a computer, and whether at all physical entities are computers (pancomputationalism). These discussions, and others, require criteria for what is digital. I propose that a state is digital if and only if it is a token of a type that serves a particular function - typically a representational function for the system. This proposal is made on a syntactic level, assuming (...)
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