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  1. Disability & ADA: Disparate Insurance Coverage for Physical and Psychological Disabilities Does Not Violate ADA.Nicklas A. Akers - 2000 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 28 (1):92-94.
  2. Locked-in Happiness.Zac Alstin - 2011 - Bioethics Research Notes 23 (1):11.
    Alstin, Zac Results of a Belgian study have revealed that a large number of people suffering from Locked-In Syndrome are happy. Disability is foremost a challenge to one's values, not to our happiness.
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  3. A Life Not Worth Living.Jami L. Anderson - 2014 - In David P. Pierson (ed.), Breaking Bad: Critical Essays on the Contexts, Politics, Style, and Reception of the Television Series. Lexington Press. pp. 103-118.
    What is so striking about Breaking Bad is how centrally impairment and disability feature in the lives of the characters of this series. It is unusual for a television series to cast characters with visible or invisible impairments. On the rare occasions that television shows do have characters with impairments, these characters serve no purpose other than to contribute to their ‘Otherness.’ Breaking Bad not only centralizes impairment, but impairment drives and sustains the story lines. I use three interrelated themes (...)
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  4. Accurate Self-Assessment, Autonomous Ignorance, and the Appreciation of Disability.Joel Anderson & Warren Lux - 2004 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (4):309-312.
  5. Rehabilitating Human Nature.Chrisoula Andreou - 2010 - Bioethics 24 (9):461-469.
    I review the main models of disability and introduce a line of reasoning that has been neglected in the debate concerning disability and disadvantage. My reasoning suggests that while disablism can and should be combated, success will require more challenging transformations than those featured in the literature.
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  6. Is It Bad to Be Disabled? Adjudicating Between the Mere-Difference and the Bad-Difference Views of Disability.Vuko Andrić & Joachim Wündisch - 2015 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 9 (3):1–16.
    This paper examines the impact of disability on wellbeing and presents arguments against the mere-difference view of disability. According to the mere-difference view, disability does not by itself make disabled people worse off on balance. Rather, if disability has a negative impact on wellbeing overall, this is only so because society is not treating disabled people the way it ought to treat them. In objection to the mere-difference view, it has been argued, roughly, that the view licenses the permissibility of (...)
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  7. Are Attempts to Have Impaired Children Justifiable?K. W. Anstey - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (5):286-288.
    Couples should not be allowed to select either for or against deafnessRecently, a US couple deliberately attempted to ensure the birth of a deaf child via artificial insemination.1 In opposing this action, I wish to focus on one argument they employ to support it, namely that in trying to have a deaf child, the women see themselves as no different from parents trying to have a girl. Girls can be discriminated against the same as deaf people and “black people have (...)
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  8. Deafness, Ideas and the Language of Thought in the Late 1600s.Noga Arikha - 2005 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (2):233 – 262.
  9. Disability, Self Image, and Modern Political Theory.Barbara Arneil - 2009 - Political Theory 37 (2):218-242.
    Charles Taylor argues that recognition begins with the politics of "self-image," as groups represented in the past by others in ways harmful to their own identity replace negative historical self-images with positive ones of their own making. Given the centrality of "self image" to his politics of recognition, it is striking that Taylor, himself, represents disabled people in language that is both limiting and depreciating. The author argues such negative self-images are not unique to Taylor but endemic to modern political (...)
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  10. Disability, Priority, and Social Justice.Richard Arneson - manuscript
    Richard J. Arneson version 7/27/99 Is having a disability more like being a member of a racially stigmatized group or like lacking a talent? Both analogies might be apt. The Americans with Disabilities Act stresses the former analogy. The framing thought is that people with disabilities are objects of prejudice and prejudiced behaviors which wrongfully exclude them from participation in important social practices such as the labor market. Think for example of a blind person whose job applications are always automatically (...)
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  11. Theory of Mind and Schizophrenia☆.Rajendra D. Badgaiyan - 2009 - Consciousness and Cognition 18 (1):320-322.
    A number of cognitive and behavioral variables influence the performance in tasks of theory of mind (ToM). Since two of the most important variables, memory and explicit expression, are impaired in schizophrenic patients, the ToM appears inconsistent in these patients. An ideal instrument of ToM should therefore account for deficient memory and impaired ability of these patients to explicitly express intentions. If such an instrument is developed, it should provide information that can be used not only to understand the pathophysiology (...)
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  12. The Ethics of Autism: Among Them, but Not of Them.Deborah R. Barnbaum - 2008 - Indiana University Press.
    Autism is one of the most compelling, controversial, and heartbreaking cognitive disorders. It presents unique philosophical challenges as well, raising intriguing questions in philosophy of mind, cognitive science, and philosophy of language that need to be explored if the autistic population is to be responsibly served. Starting from the "theory of mind" thesis that a fundamental deficit in autism is the inability to recognize that other persons have minds, Deborah R. Barnbaum considers its implications for the nature of consciousness, our (...)
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  13. Disability and Adaptive Preference.Elizabeth Barnes - 2009 - Philosophical Perspectives 23 (1):1-22.
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  14. Disability, Minority, and Difference.Elizabeth Barnes - 2009 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (4):337-355.
    abstract In this paper I develop a characterization of disability according to which disability is in no way a sub-optimal feature. I argue, however, that this conception of disability is compatible with the idea that having a disability is, at least in a restricted sense, a harm. I then go on to argue that construing disability in this way avoids many of the common objections levelled at accounts which claim that disability is not a negative feature.
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  15. Attentional Deficit Versus Impaired Reality Testing: What is the Role of Executive Dysfunction in Complex Visual Hallucinations?Ralf-Peter Behrendt - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):758-759.
    A “multifactorial” model should accommodate a psychological perspective, aiming to relate the phenomenology of complex visual hallucinations not only to neurobiological findings but also an understanding of the patient's psychological problems and situation in life. Greater attention needs to be paid to the role of the “lack of insight” patients may have into their hallucinations and its relationship to cognitive impairment.
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  16. Hallucinations in Schizophrenia, Sensory Impairment, and Brain Disease: A Unifying Model.Ralf-Peter Behrendt & Claire Young - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):771-787.
    Based on recent insight into the thalamocortical system and its role in perception and conscious experience, a unified pathophysiological framework for hallucinations in neurological and psychiatric conditions is proposed, which integrates previously unrelated neurobiological and psychological findings. Gamma-frequency rhythms of discharge activity from thalamic and cortical neurons are facilitated by cholinergic arousal and resonate in networks of thalamocortical circuits, thereby transiently forming assemblies of coherent gamma oscillations under constraints of afferent sensory input and prefrontal attentional mechanisms. If perception is based (...)
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  17. Identity and Disability.Christopher Belshaw - 2000 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 17 (3):263–276.
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  18. Volitional Disability and Physician Attitudes Toward Noncompliance.J. Bergen - 1984 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 9 (4).
    We develop the concept of a volitional disability as an aid in understanding those patients who behave in ways that are harmful to themselves in spite of their desire to do otherwise. Using this concept enables us to describe their behavior as intentional but ‘unvoluntary’. We demonstrate the clinical reality of such behavior by giving clinical examples of the behavior of those with phobic, compulsive, and addictive disorders. We then attempt to show how some kinds of self-harming behavior of noncompliant (...)
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  19. Disability, “Being Unhealthy,” and Rights to Health.Jerome Bickenbach - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 41 (4):821-828.
    Often advocates for persons with disabilities strongly object to the claim that disability essentially involves a decrement in health. Yet, it is a mystery why anyone with an impairment would ever deny, or feel uncomfortable being told that, their impairment is at bottom a health problem. In this paper, I investigate the conceptual linkages between health and disability, relying on robust conceptualizations of both notions, and conclude it makes no conceptual sense to insist that a person can be seriously impaired (...)
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  20. The Role of Context and Inhibition in ADHD.Petra Björne & Christian Balkenius - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):426-427.
    We have shown in a computational model that a poor memory for context could result in some of the behaviors associated with ADHD, which is well in line with the dynamic developmental theory. Given the important role of context in extinction, a weaker context due to a steeper delay-of-reinforcement gradient would result in impaired inhibition.
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  21. The Collective Representation of Affliction: Some Reflections on Disability and Disease as Social Facts.Alan Blum - 1985 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 6 (2).
    A perspective is developed for approaching affliction as a social fact. Disability and disease are considered as two ways in which we suffer a disjunction which arises from the need to take initiative with respect to the inexorable, whether that means the mark of disability or the unconquerability of disease.The story of affliction always raises and masks in certain respects the problem of suffering as the collective representation of our experience of subjectivity where that experience passes through the separateness of (...)
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  22. Who Are the Mentally Handicapped?Paula Boddington & Tessa Podpadec - 1991 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 8 (2):177-190.
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  23. Precaution Systems and Ritualized Behavior.Pascal Boyer & Pierre Liénard - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (6):635-641.
    In reply to commentary on our target article, we supply further evidence and hypotheses in the description of ritualized behaviors in humans. Reactions to indirect fitness threats probably activate specialized precaution systems rather than a unified form of danger-avoidance or causal reasoning. Impairment of precaution systems may be present in pathologies other than obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), autism in particular. Ritualized behavior is attention-grabbing enough to be culturally transmitted whether or not it is associated with group identity, cohesion, or with any (...)
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  24. A Transhumanist Fault Line Around Disability: Morphological Freedom and the Obligation to Enhance.H. G. Bradshaw & R. ter Meulen - 2010 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (6):670-684.
    The transhumanist literature encompasses diverse nonnovel positions on questions of disability and obligation reflecting long-running political philosophical debates on freedom and value choice, complicated by the difficulty of projecting values to enhanced beings. These older questions take on a more concrete form given transhumanist uses of biotechnologies. This paper will contrast the views of Hughes and Sandberg on the obligations persons with "disabilities" have to enhance and suggest a new model. The paper will finish by introducing a distinction between the (...)
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  25. CanThere Be a Disability Studies Theory of "End-of-Life Autonomy"?Harold Braswell - 2011 - The Disability Studies Quarterly 31 (4):online.
  26. What is Wrong with Eliminating Genetically Based Disability?B. Brecher - 2011 - Public Health Ethics 4 (3):218-225.
    An argument often made against the genetic elimination of disability is that to prevent people with a particular genetic make-up being born is to disvalue, or even threaten, those people who actually have it. The thought is that the view that the world would be a better place without, say, Huntingdon’s Chorea, must imply that the world would be a better place without those people who currently have it. In opposition to this objection to the elimination of genetically based conditions, (...)
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  27. Two Moral Issues About Disability.Dan W. Brock - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (3):1 – 2.
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  28. The Non-Identity Problem and Genetic Harms – the Case of Wrongful Handicaps.Dan W. Brock - 1995 - Bioethics 9 (3):269–275.
    The Human Genome Project will produce information permitting increasing opportunities to prevent genetically transmitted harms, most of which will be compatible with a life worth living, through avoiding conception or terminating a pregnancy. Failure to prevent these harms when it is possible for parents to do so without substantial burdens or costs to themselves or others are what J call “wrongful handicaps”. Derek Parfit has developed a systematic difficulty for any such cases being wrongs — when the harm could be (...)
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  29. Is Disability a Neutral Condition?Jeffrey M. Brown - 2016 - Journal of Social Philosophy 47 (2):188-210.
    The issue of whether biological and psychological properties associated with disability can be harmful, beneficial, or neutral brings up an important philosophical question about how we evaluate disability, and disability’s impact on well-being. The debate is usually characterized as between those who argue disability is intrinsically harmful, and disability rights advocates who argue that disability is just another way of being different, in part, because disability can also provide important benefits. I argue that this debate is a false one, as (...)
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  30. Dysfunctions, Disabilities, and Disordered Minds.Bengt Brülde & Filip Radovic - 2006 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (2):133-141.
  31. Choosing Who Will Be Disabled: Genetic Intervention and the Morality of Inclusion.Allen Buchanan - 1996 - Social Philosophy and Policy 13 (2):18.
    The Nobel prize-winning molecular biologist Walter Gilbert described the mapping and sequencing of the human genome as “the grail of molecular biology.” The implication, endorsed by enthusiasts for the new genetics, is that possessing a comprehensive knowledge of human genetics, like possessing the Holy Grail, will give us miraculous powers to heal the sick, and to reduce human suffering and disabilities. Indeed, the rhetoric invoked to garner public support for the Human Genome Project appears to appeal to the best of (...)
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  32. How Can We Believe Those Stories? A Nordic Perspective The Ethical Grounds of Competing Truth-Claims.Frank Bylov - 2013 - Ethics and Social Welfare 7 (3):232-240.
    This paper discusses the different, often competing, even conflicting, truth-claims that are heard around the personal narratives of marginalized, stigmatized and culturally muted people?in this case people with intellectual disabilities. Since people with intellectual disabilities began speaking up in the 1980s, tensions have emerged as to whose voice is authentic, whose story can be believed. This matters because we see the consequences of failure to believe those stories in scandals of abuse in settings, such as Winterbourne View (England) in 2011. (...)
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  33. The Importance of Special Cases: Or How the Deaf Might Be, But Are Not, Phonological Dyslexics.Ruth Campbell - 1991 - Mind and Language 6 (2):107-112.
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  34. Review of Elizabeth Barnes, The Minority Body. [REVIEW]Stephen M. Campbell & Joseph A. Stramondo - 2016 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
  35. Choosing Deafness with Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis: An Ethical Way to Carry on a Cultural Bloodline?Silvia Camporesi - 2010 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (1):86.
    These words were written by ethicist Jonathan Glover in his paper “Future People, Disability and Screening” in 1992. Whereas screening and choosing for a disability remained a theoretical possibility 16 years ago, it has now become reality. In 2006, Susannah Baruch and colleagues at John Hopkins University published a survey of 190 American preimplantation genetic diagnosis clinics, and found that 3% reported having the intentional use of PGD “to select an embryo for the presence of a disability.” Even before, in (...)
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  36. Introduction: Rethinking Philosophical Presumptions in Light of Cognitive Disability.Licia Carlson & Eva Feder Kittay - 2009 - Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):307-330.
  37. Death, Disability, and Dialogue.Gerald Casenave - 2003 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (1):87-89.
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  38. Accommodation or Cure: A Synthesis of Neurodiverse and Cure Theory Recommendations for Autism Action.Kavanagh Chandra - 2015 - Association for the Advancement of Philosophy in Psychiatry Bulletin 22 (1):4-8.
    As a result of vocal autism activists pushing against traditional views of autism, there is a bilateral debate that reflects a deeper philosophical divide between medical and social definitions of disability. Both sides seek to determine the manner in which autistics and their communities view autism, and thus influence the manner in which cures or treatments are sought, dispensed and taken up. Through an investigation of this debate, this project will explore the practical benefits and ethical obligations of accommodating autistic (...)
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  39. Review of Julia Kristeva's Hatred and Forgiveness. [REVIEW]Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2016 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 121 (10):721-22.
    Julia Kristeva shines in this book. The review makes a case for us studying Kristeva as the most relevant psychoanalyst of our time. She should be read over Lacan. Her understanding of this century is more incisive than any other psychoanalytic thinker alive today. At least, in this book. Kristeva's contention is that hatred gives way to paranoia.
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  40. Disability, Geography and Ethics.Vera Chouinard - 2000 - Philosophy and Geography 3 (1):70 – 80.
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  41. The Body Politic: Theorising Disability and Impairment.Phillip Cole - 2007 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (2):169–176.
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  42. Disability and Nationality: Martha Nussbaum on Justice.Michael L. Corrado - 2008 - Essays in Philosophy 9 (1).
  43. Redefining Disability: Maleficent, Unjust and Inconsistent.B. Cox-White & S. F. Boxall - 2008 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (6):558-576.
    Disability activists' redefinition of “disability” as a social, rather than a medical, problem attempts to reassign causality. We explicate the untenable implications of this approach and argue this definition is maleficent, unjust, and inconsistent. Thus, redefining disability as a socially caused phenomenon is, from a moral point of view, ill-advised.
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  44. Respecting Disability.Adam Cureton - 2007 - Teaching Philosophy 30 (4):383-402.
    The goal of this paper is to offer some remarks about how teachers, especially teachers of moral theories and arguments, should respond to insulting messages about disability that may be expressed in their courses. While there is a strong prima facie presumption for instructors to convey the truth as they see it, this is not an absolute requirement when the views they teach have a tendency to be insulting. I investigate some circumstances in which a moral view embeds and expresses (...)
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  45. Moral Worth and Severe Intellectual Disability – A Hybrid View.Benjamin L. Curtis & Simo Vehmas - 2013 - In Jerome E. Bickenbach, Franziska Felder & Barbara Schmitz (eds.), Disability and the Good Human Life. Cambridge University Press. pp. 19-49.
    Consider: You can save either a human or a normal adult dog from a burning building (with no risk to yourself and at little cost), but not both. However, the human is a human with a severe intellectually disability (or, as we shall say, a “SID”). -/- Which one should you save? There is disagreement in the literature about which this issue. Two opposing camps exist, which we call “the intrinsic property camp ” and “the special relations camp.” Those in (...)
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  46. Ian Hacking, Learner Categories and Human Taxonomies.Andrew Davis - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (3-4):441-455.
    I use Ian Hacking 's views to explore ways of classifying people, exploiting his distinction between indifferent kinds and interactive kinds, and his accounts of how we 'make up' people. The natural kind/essentialist approach to indifferent kinds is explored in some depth. I relate this to debates in psychiatry about the existence of mental illness, and to educational controversies about the credentials of learner classifications such as 'dyslexic'. Claims about the 'existence' of learning disabilities cannot be given a clear, simple (...)
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  47. A Thoughtful Look at Disability.Dena S. Davis - 2008 - Hastings Center Report 38 (2):54-55.
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  48. Selecting Potential Children and Unconditional Parental Love.John Davis - 2008 - Bioethics 22 (5):258–268.
    For now, the best way to select a child's genes is to select a potential child who has those genes, using genetic testing and either selective abortion, sperm and egg donors, or selecting embryos for implantation. Some people even wish to select against genes that are only mildly undesirable, or to select for superior genes. I call this selection drift– the standard for acceptable children is creeping upwards. The President's Council on Bioethics and others have raised the parental love objection: (...)
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  49. Invisible Disability.N. Ann Davis - 2005 - Ethics 116 (1):153-213.
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  50. Disability and Bioethics: Removing Barriers to Understanding and Setting the Agenda for a New Conversation.Walter S. Davis - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (3):64-65.
    (2001). Disability and Bioethics: Removing Barriers to Understanding and Setting the Agenda for a New Conversation. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 1, No. 3, pp. 64-65.
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