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  1. Time and Causality.Evandro Agazzi - 1978 - Epistemologia 1 (2):397.
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  2. Assimetria causal: um estudo.Túlio Roberto Xavier de Aguiar - 2003 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 44 (108):279-289.
    This paper examines the asymmetrical aspect of causal relation, confronting it to Humean and Neo-Humean's view. Following Hausman and Ehring, we favor a situational approach to causal asymmetry. We explore the Hausman's analysis of flagpole's example, clearing the connexions between causation and explanation. Our general diagnosis is that the Neo-humean tradition wrongly supposes that nomic relations, with the exception of minor details, exhaust the causal relations.
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  3. Causality and Time: A Sense of Reduction.Sebastian Alvarez Toledo - 2008 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 27 (1):29-42.
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  4. Backwards Causation.W. S. Anglin - 1980 - Analysis 41 (2):86 - 91.
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  5. Ehring's Theory of Causal Asymmetry.Gregory Bassham - 1986 - Analysis 46 (1):29 - 32.
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  6. Introduction to Special Issue on 'Actual Causation'.Michael Baumgartner & Luke Glynn - 2013 - Erkenntnis 78 (1):1-8.
    An actual cause of some token effect is itself a token event that helped to bring about that effect. The notion of an actual cause is different from that of a potential cause – for example a pre-empted backup – which had the capacity to bring about the effect, but which wasn't in fact operative on the occasion in question. Sometimes actual causes are also distinguished from mere background conditions: as when we judge that the struck match was a cause (...)
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  7. On von Wright's Argument for Backward Causation.Tom L. Beauchamp & Daniel N. Robinson - 1975 - Ratio (June):99-103.
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  8. Direction and Description.Y. Ben-Menahem - 2001 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 32 (4):621-635.
    This paper deals with the dependence of directionality in the course of events-or our claims concerning such directionality-on the modes of description we use in speaking of the events in question. I argue that criteria of similarity and individuation play a crucial role in assessments of directionality. This is an extension of Davidson's claim regarding the difference between causal and explanatory contexts. The argument is based on a characterisation of notions of necessity and contingency that differ from their modal logic (...)
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  9. Backwards Causation Still Impossible.Hanoch Ben-Yami - 2010 - Analysis 70 (1):89-92.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  10. The Impossibility of Backwards Causation.Hanoch Ben-Yami - 2007 - Philosophical Quarterly 57 (228):439–455.
    Dummett and others have failed to show that an effect can precede its cause. Dummett claimed that 'backwards causation' is unproblematic in agentless worlds, and tried to show under what conditions it is rational to believe that even backwards agent-causation occurs. Relying on considerations originating in discussions of special relativity, I show that the latter conditions actually support the view that backwards agent-causation is impossible. I next show that in Dummett's agentless worlds explanation does not necessitate backwards causation. I then (...)
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  11. Why Cannot an Effect Precede its Cause?Max Black - 1955 - Analysis 16 (3):49-58.
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  12. Simultaneous Causation.Myles Brand - 1980 - In Peter van Inwagen (ed.), Time and Cause. D. Reidel. pp. 137-153.
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  13. Precognition and the Philosophy of Science: An Essay on Backwards Causation.Bob Brier - 1977 - Philosophical Review 86 (1):124-125.
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  14. Magicians, Alarm Clocks, and Backward Causation.Bob Brier - 1973 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 11 (4):359-364.
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  15. A Causal Model for Causal Priority.Martin Bunzl - 1984 - Erkenntnis 21 (1):31 - 44.
    Recent attempts to fix the direction of causal priority without reference to the direction of temporal priority have begun with an analysis of the causal relation itself. I offer a method, based on causal modelling theory, designed to determine the direction of causal priority while remaining as agnostic as possible about the nature of the causal relation.
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  16. Backward Causation, Isolation and the Pursuit of Justice.Milan M. Cirkovic & Suzana Cveticanin - 2002 - Epistemologia 25 (1):145-162.
    The recent operationalization of the famous Newcomb's game by Schmidt (1998) offers an interesting and thought-provoking look at the plausibility of backward causation in a Newtonian universe. Hereby we investigate two details of the Schmidt's scenario which may, at least in principle, invalidate his conclusion in two different domains: one dealing with the issue of Newtonian predictability in specific instance of human actions, and the other stemming from a possible strategy aimed at obviating the anthropically oriented view of backward causation (...)
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  17. Causal Priority and Causal Conditionship.J. A. Cover - 1987 - Synthese 71 (1):19 - 36.
    Temporal analyses of causal directionality fail if causes needn't precede their effects. Certain well-known difficulties with alternative (non-temporal) analyses have, in recent accounts, been avoided by attending more carefully to the formal features of relations typically figuring in philosophical discussions of causation. I discuss here a representative of such accounts, offered by David Sanford, according to which a correct analysis of causal priority must issue from viewing the condition relation as nonsymmetrical. The theory is shown first to be an implicitly (...)
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  18. Backwards Causation and the Chancy Past.John Cusbert - 2018 - Mind 127 (505):1-33.
    I argue that the past can be objectively chancy in cases of backwards causation, and defend a view of chance that allows for this. Using a case, I argue against the popular temporal view of chance, according to which chances are defined relative to times, and all chancy events must lie in the future. I then state and defend the causal view of chance, according to which chances are defined relative to causal histories, and all chancy events must lie causally (...)
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  19. Physics and the Direction of Causation.D. Dieks - 1986 - Erkenntnis 25 (1):85 - 110.
    Two proposals for a physicalistic analysis of causation — the so-called transference model and an account given by J. L. Mackie — are examined and found wanting on the score of physical objectivity. This shortcoming can be remedied, but it is further argued that both proposals embody a too restricted conception of what a physicalistic analysis of causation should be. A more general program is proposed.
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  20. Causal Loops and the Independence of Causal Facts.Phil Dowe - 2001 - Proceedings of the Philosophy of Science Association 2001 (3):S89-.
    According to Hugh Mellor in Real Time II (1998, Ch. 12), assuming the logical independence of causal facts and the 'law of large numbers', causal loops are impossible because if they were possible they would produce inconsistent sets of frequencies. I clarify the argument, and argue that it would be preferable to abandon the relevant independence assumption in the case of causal loops.
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  21. Backwards Causation and the Direction of Causal Processes.Phil Dowe - 1996 - Mind 105 (418):227-248.
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  22. Causal Asymmetry and Causal Relata: Reply to Lee.Douglas Ehring - 1988 - Synthese 76 (3):371 - 375.
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  23. Papineau on Causal Asymmetry.Douglas Ehring - 1987 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 38 (1):81-87.
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  24. Causal Asymmetry.Douglas Ehring - 1982 - Journal of Philosophy 79 (12):761-774.
    This thesis addresses the problem of causal asymmetry. This problem may be characterized as follows: what is the relation R such that if an event c causes an event e c bears relation R to e but e does not bear relation R to e. The traditional Humean account of causal asymmetry is that "R" may be replaced by "temporally prior." Difficulties with this account based on consideration of cases of simultaneous causation and backward causation have given rise to non-Humean (...)
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  25. On Mackie's New Account of Causal Priority.Douglas Ehring - 1980 - Analysis 41 (2):82 - 83.
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  26. The Brownian Direction of Causation.Douglas Ehring - 1980 - Journal of Critical Analysis 8 (2):51-56.
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  27. Causation and Time Reversal.Matt Farr - forthcoming - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axx025.
    What would it be for a process to happen backwards in time? Would such a process involve different causal relations? It is common to understand the time reversal invariance of a physical theory in causal terms, such that whatever can happen forwards in time (according to the theory) can also happen backwards in time. This has led many to hold that time reversal symmetry is incompatible with the asymmetry of cause and effect. This paper critiques the causal reading of time (...)
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  28. Review of Mathias Frisch's Causal Reasoning in Physics. [REVIEW]Matt Farr - 2016 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 67 (4).
    Review of 'Causal Reasoning in Physics' by Mathias Frisch for British Journal for Philosophy of Science.
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  29. A Relic of a Bygone Age? Causation, Time Symmetry and the Directionality Argument.Matt Farr & Alexander Reutlinger - 2013 - Erkenntnis 78 (2):215-235.
    Bertrand Russell famously argued that causation is not part of the fundamental physical description of the world, describing the notion of cause as “a relic of a bygone age”. This paper assesses one of Russell’s arguments for this conclusion: the ‘Directionality Argument’, which holds that the time symmetry of fundamental physics is inconsistent with the time asymmetry of causation. We claim that the coherence and success of the Directionality Argument crucially depends on the proper interpretation of the ‘ time symmetry’ (...)
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  30. Backward Causation.Jan Faye - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Sometimes also called retro causation. A common feature of our world seems to be that in all cases of causation, the cause and the effect are placed in time so that the cause precedes its effect temporally. Our normal understanding of causation assumes this feature to such a degree that we intuitively have great difficulty imagining things differently. The notion of backward causation, however, stands for the idea that the temporal order of cause and effect is a mere contingent feature (...)
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  31. Magicians, Alarm Clocks, and Backward Causation: A Comment.Antony Flew - 1973 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 11 (4):365-366.
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  32. Backwards Causation in Defense of Free Will.Peter Forrest - 1985 - Mind 94 (April):210-17.
  33. Causal Models and the Asymmetry of State Preparation.Mathias Frisch - 2010 - In Mauricio Suarez, Mauro Dorato & Miklos Redei (eds.), EPSA Philosophical Issues in the Sciences · Launch of the European Philosophy of Science Association. Springer. pp. 75--85.
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  34. Causality and Dispersion: A Reply to John Norton.Mathias Frisch - 2009 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 60 (3):487 - 495.
    Classical dispersion relations are derived from a time-asymmetric constraint. I argue that the standard causal interpretation of this constraint plays a scientifically legitimate role in dispersion theory, and hence provides a counterexample to the causal skepticism advanced by John Norton and others. Norton ([2009]) argues that the causal interpretation of the time-asymmetric constraint is an empty honorific and that the constraint can be motivated by purely non-causal considerations. In this paper I respond to Norton's criticisms and argue that Norton's skepticism (...)
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  35. Does a Low-Entropy Constraint Prevent Us From Influencing the Past?Mathias Frisch - 2007 - In Andreas Hüttemann & Gerhard Ernst (eds.), Time, Chance, and Reduction: Philosophical Aspects of Statistical Mechanics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 13--33.
    David Albert and Barry Loewer have argued that the temporal asymmetry of our concept of causal influence or control is grounded in the statistical mechanical assumption of a low-entropy past. In this paper I critically examine Albert's and Loewer 's accounts.
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  36. Some Remarks on Backwards Causation.Brian Garrett - 2015 - Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 71 (4):695-704.
    Resumo Neste texto, o autor concentra-se em dois artigos históricos: o de Max Black “Why cannot an effect precede its cause”? e o de Michael Dummett “Bringing about the Past”. O autor irá mostrar onde falha o “bilking argument” de Black, contra a possibilidade da causalidade invertida. Por conseguinte, o autor irá concordar com Dummett, na possibilidade de um agente actuar a fim de que algo possa ocorrer no passado, contudo, discordando da argumentação de Dummett face a um desafio céptico, (...)
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  37. Is Preacceleration of Particles in Dirac's Electrodynamics a Case of Backward Causation? The Myth of Retrocausation in Classical Electrodynamics.Adolf Grunbaum - 1976 - Philosophy of Science 43 (2):165-201.
    Is it a "conceptual truth" or only a logically contingent fact that, in any given kind of case, an event x which asymmetrically causes ("produces") an event y likewise temporally precedes y or at least does not temporally succeed y? A bona fide physical example in which the cause retroproduces the effect would show that backward causation is no less conceptually possible than forward causation. And it has been claimed ([9], p. 151; [4], p. 41) that in Dirac's classical electrodynamics (...)
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  38. Is There Backward Causation in Classical Electrodynamics?Adolf Grünbaum & Allen I. Janis - 1977 - Journal of Philosophy 74 (8):475-482.
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  39. Causal Priority at the Singular Level: Fork Asymmetry-Based Accounts Meet the Generalization Strategy.Linda Leanne Habeeb - 1998 - Dissertation, City University of New York
    I dissect one particular strategy for explaining causal priority: the fork asymmetry strategy. I argue that the best objections that have been raised are objections to versions which are less than optimal. I develop the strongest version of the principle and argue that this stronger version is fully equipped to explain causal priority at the type level. So far so good. But, I discover and attempt to deal with one remaining and perhaps insurmountable problem--Fork asymmetry accounts cannot explain causal priority (...)
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  40. Meso-Level Objects, Powers, and Simultaneous Causation.Tobias Hansson Wahlberg - 2017 - Metaphysica 18 (1).
    I argue that Mumford and Anjum’s recent theory of simultaneous causation among powerful meso-level objects is problematic in several respects: it is based on a false dichotomy, it is incompatible with standard meso-level physics, it is explanatory deficient, and it threatens to render the powers metaphysics incoherent. Powers theorists are advised, therefore, to adopt a purely sequential conception of causation.
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  41. Defending Backwards Causation Against the Objection From the Ignorance Condition.Abla Hasan - forthcoming - Disputatio.
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  42. Causal Asymmetries.Daniel M. Hausman - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book, by one of the pre-eminent philosophers of science writing today, offers the most comprehensive account available of causal asymmetries. Causation is asymmetrical in many different ways. Causes precede effects; explanations cite causes not effects. Agents use causes to manipulate their effects; they don't use effects to manipulate their causes. Effects of a common cause are correlated; causes of a common effect are not. This book explains why a relationship that is asymmetrical in one of these regards is asymmetrical (...)
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  43. Causal and Explanatory Asymmetry.Daniel M. Hausman - 1982 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1982:43 - 54.
    This paper asks why causal asymmetries should give rise to explanatory asymmetries. One way to give some rationale for the asymmetries of causal explanation is to adopt a pragmatic view of explanation and to stress the fact that causes can be used to manipulate their effects. This paper argues, however, that when one recognizes that causal asymmetry is fundamentally an asymmetry of "connectedness", one can see how causal asymmetry leads to an objective difference between explanations in terms of causes and (...)
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  44. What Would Teleological Causation Be?John Hawthorne & Daniel Nolan - 2006 - In Metaphysical Essays. Oxford University Press.
    As is well known, Aristotelian natural philosophy, and many other systems of natural philosophy since, have relied heavily on teleology and teleological causation. Somehow, the purpose or end of an obj ect can be used to predict and explain what that object does: once you know that the end of an acorn is to become an oak, and a few things about what sorts of circumstances are conducive to the attainment of this end, you can predict a lot about the (...)
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  45. The Memory Criterion and the Problem of Backward Causation.David B. Hershenov - 2007 - International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (2):181-185.
    Lockeans, as well as their critics, have pointed out that the memory criterion is likely to mean that none of us were ever fetuses or even infants due to the lack of direct psychological connections between then and now. But what has been overlooked is that the memory criterion leads to either backward causation and a violation of Locke’s own very plausible principle that we can have only one origin, or backward causation and a number of overlapping people where we (...)
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  46. Explanatory Relations Between the Direction of Causation and the Fork Asymmetry.Paul Horwich - 1993 - Analysis 53 (3):154 - 155.
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  47. Causation as Simultaneous and Continuous.Michael Huemer & Ben Kovitz - 2003 - Philosophical Quarterly 53 (213):556–565.
    We propose that all actual causes are simultaneous with their direct effects, as illustrated by both everyday examples and the laws of physics. We contrast this view with the sequential conception of causation, according to which causes must occur prior to their effects. The key difference between the two views of causation lies in differing assumptions about the mathematical structure of time.
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  48. Causal Production as Interaction.Rognvaldur Ingthorsson - 2002 - Metaphysica 3 (1):87-119.
    The paper contains a novel realist account of causal production and the necessary connection between cause and effect. I argue that the asymmetric relation between causally connected events must be regarded as a product of a symmetric interaction between two or more entities. All the entities involved contribute to the producing, and so count as parts of the cause, and they all suffer a change, and so count as parts of the effect. Cause and effect, on this account, are two (...)
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  49. Transference and the Direction of Causation.A. David Kline - 1985 - Erkenntnis 23 (1):51 - 54.
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  50. The Direction of Causation.Alton David Kline - 1976 - Dissertation, The University of Wisconsin - Madison
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