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  1. Observing Ritual “Proprietyli” as Focusing the “Familiar” in the Affairs of the Day.Roger T. Ames - 2002 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 1 (2):143-156.
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  2. Confucius and the Ontology of Knowing.Roger T. Ames - 1988 - In Eliot Deutsch & Gerald James Larson (eds.), Interpreting Across Boundaries: New Essays in Comparative Philosophy. Princeton University Press. pp. 265-279.
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  3. Translating Chinese Classics in a Colonial Context: James Legge and His Two Versions of the Zhongyong, by Hui Wang, Peter Lang. [REVIEW]Paul Boshears - 2012 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (1):166 - 167.
    Translating Chinese Classics in a Colonial Context: James Legge and His Two Versions of the Zhongyong, by Hui Wang, Peter Lang Content Type Journal Article Pages 166-167 Authors Paul Boshears, Europäische Universität für Interdisziplinäre Studien/The European Graduate School Journal Comparative and Continental Philosophy Online ISSN 1757-0646 Print ISSN 1757-0638 Journal Volume Volume 4 Journal Issue Volume 4, Number 1 / 2012.
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  4. Focusing the Familiar: A Translation and Philosophical Interpretation of the Zhongyong.Kenneth W. Holloway - 2004 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (1):129–131.
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  5. On “Trust and Being True”: Toward a Genealogy of Morals.Whalen Lai - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (3):257-274.
    This Nietzschesque “genealogy of morals” presents the Confucian virtue of xin (trust and true) so basic to friendship as a civic virtue rooted among social equals. Among non-equals, a servant has to prove his trustworthiness but not yet vice versa. The script 信 ( xin ) tells of living up to one’s words. Yanxing 言行 (speech and action) describes actively keeping a verbal promise. The Agrarian school endorses xin as the primary virtue in its utopia of virtual equals. It knew (...)
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  6. Zhongyong as Grand Harmony: An Alternative Reading to Ames and Hall's Focusing the Familiar.Chenyang Li - 2004 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 3 (2):173-188.
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  7. The Giant Forge and the Great Ironsmith: Revisiting the Implications of the Wu Xing Physics of the Zhongyong.Ronnie Littlejohn - 2004 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 3 (2):205-215.
  8. Mediality and Rationality in Aristotle's Account of Excellence of Character.Mark Mccullagh - 1992 - Apeiron 25 (4):155-174.
    I offer a reading of Aristotle’s “doctrine of the mean” that avoids two pitfalls: taking it as truistic, and taking it as involving the bizarre thesis that whenever one acts as reason directs, one’s action is mid-way between some extremes. The crucial point is that while Aristotle denies the existence of useful general ethical truths, he himself offers truths about the *likelihoods* with which rationality will require actions of certain types; and it is with such truths that the statistical idea (...)
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  9. Reading Zhongyong as a Gongfu Instruction: Comments on Focusing the Familiar.Peimin Ni - 2004 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 3 (2):189-203.
    Roger Ames and David Hall’s Focusing the Falimiar makes a significant contribution to revealing the holistic and dynamic worldview entailed in the Confucian classic--the Zhongyong. Yet their emphasis on metaphysics eclipses an important dimension of the book—the “gongfu” (kungfu) instruction dimension. In this paper, the author first explains this concern by discussing Ames’ and Hall’s translation of the key terms of the book, namely “zhong,” “yong,” and “cheng.” Then he shows that their work, though falls short of revealing the gongfu (...)
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  10. Chung Yung and the Greek Conception of Justice.A. Tuan Nuyen - 1999 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 26 (2):187-202.
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  11. The Doctrine of the Mean (Zhongyong) and Division Into Three.Pang Pu - 2008 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 40 (4):10-23.
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  12. Confucius’s Ethics (Ethics-1, M34).Shyam Ranganathan - 2016 - In A. Raghuramaraju (ed.), Philosophy, E-PG Pathshala. Delhi: India, Department of Higher Education (NMEICT).
    Confucius, being one of the earliest of Chinese philosophers that we know of, seems uniquely responsible for setting the tone of Chinese philosophy. His focus on ethical questions of the Way no doubt serves as a reminder of the type of perennial questions that philosophers should answer. In this module, I outline the main concepts of the Analects, followed by an elaboration on the central Confucian ethical doctrines: The doctrine of the Mean, Filial Piety, Patriarchal Hierarchy and the Golden Rule. (...)
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  13. Harmony and the Mean in theNicomachean Ethics and theZhongyong.May Sim - 2004 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 3 (2):253-280.
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  14. On Some Dimensions of the Zhongyong.Nathan Sivin - 2004 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 3 (2):167-172.
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  15. Interpreting the Zhongyong: Was Confucius a Sophist or an Aristotelian?Richard N. Stichler - 2004 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 3 (2):235-251.
  16. A Comparative Study of Two Doctrines of the Mean Between Aristotle and Confucius.Fang Xia - unknown
    The doctrine of the Mean owns an important academic position in ethics theories both in the Western and Eastern philosophical fields. To understand the doctrine of the Mean will benefit further study of virtuous ethical theories. Therefore, I choose this topic as an approach to studying Aristotelian and Confucian ethics theories. The methodology I have chosen is a comparative study. The literary sources are mainly from Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics and Zhongyong, which recorded Confucius’ theories of the Mean, and Confucius’ Lunyu (...)
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  17. The Concept of Junzi in the Zhongyong.Wenyu Xie - 2011 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (4):501-520.
    The concept of junzi is the central issue in the Zhongyong , one of the most important Confucian books. A junzi leads a life starting with the original disposition of cheng 诚(being truthful to the real self). This paper analyzes the disposition of cheng to reveal two kinds of good in human existence, that is, the natural good, which is present in cheng ; and the idea of good, which is a conceptualization of the natural good. The natural good is (...)
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  18. A Synthetic Comprehension of the Way of Zhong in Early Confucian Philosophy.Keqian Xu - 2012 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 7 (3):422-438.
    Zhong 中 is a very important philosophical concept in early Confucianism. Both the received ancient Confucian classics and the newly discovered ancient bamboo manuscripts tell us that adhering to the principle of zhong was an important charge that had been transmitted and inherited by early ancient Chinese political leaders from generation to generation. Confucius and his followers adopted the concept of zhong and further developed it into a sophisticated doctrine, which is usually called zhongdao 中道 (the Way of zhong) or (...)
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  19. Revealing the Dao of Heaven Through the Dao of Humans: Sincerity in The Doctrine of the Mean.Yun Chen - 2009 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (4):537-551.
    In Zhongyong 中庸 (The Doctrine of the Mean), cheng 诚 (sincerity) is the “Dao of all Daos”, the “virtue of all virtues”, and thus connects the Dao of humans and that of Heaven. The Dao of humans can reveal the sincerity in the Dao of Heaven in two approaches: to contemplate on sincerity and to conduct in sincerity. Meanwhile, sincerity in the Dao of Heaven is unfolded in everything’s seeking for its own nature and destiny, thus the most fundamental approach (...)
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