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  1. Professor Malcolm on Dreams.A. J. Ayer - 1960 - Journal of Philosophy 57 (August):517-534.
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  2. Published in Skeptical Inquirer 1991, 15, 362-370.Susan Blackmore - unknown
    What could it mean to be conscious in your dreams? For most of us, dreaming is something quite separate from normal life. When we wake up from being chased by a ferocious tiger, or seduced by a devastatingly good-looking Nobel Prize winner we realize with relief or disappointment that "it was only a dream.".
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  3. Malcolm and the Criterion of Sleep.Robert L. Caldwell - 1965 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 43 (3):339-352.
  4. What Dreams Are Made Of.C. Chihara - 1965 - Theoria 31 (3):145-58.
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  5. Are Dreams Experiences?Daniel C. Dennett - 1976 - Philosophical Review 85 (2):151.
  6. Mental Activity in Dreams.Kathleen Emmett - 1983 - der 16. Weltkongress Für Philosophie 2:458-465.
    Many philosophers have argued that dreams cannot be conscious states since they occur during sleep. Some wish to identify dreams with only what we remember of them and, discounting the reliability of memory, also discount dreams. I will argue that access to dreaming is not limited to our waking memories of them. Dreaming is similar to other marginal or altered states of consciousness, and as such can be held to involve consciousness even when we do not remember dreams.
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  7. Oneiric Experiences.Kathleen Emmett - 1978 - Philosophical Studies 34 (November):445-50.
  8. Dreaming Souls: Sleep, Dreams, and the Evolution of the Conscious Mind: Sleep, Dreams, and the Evolution of the Conscious Mind.Owen Flanagan - 2001 - Oup Usa.
    In Dreaming Souls, Owen Flanagan provides both an accessible survey of the latest research on sleep and dreams and a compelling new theory about the nature and function of dreaming. Flanagan argues that while sleep has a clear biological function and adaptive value, dreams are merely side effects, 'free-riders', irrelevant from an evolutionary point of view. But dreams are hardly unimportant. Indeed, Flanagan argues that dreams are self-expressive, the result of our need to find or create meaning, even when we (...)
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  9. Dreaming Souls: Sleep, Dreams, and the Evolution of the Conscious Mind.Owen J. Flanagan - 2000 - Oxford University Press.
    What, if anything, do dreams tell us about ourselves? What is the relationship between types of sleep and types of dreams? Does dreaming serve any purpose? Or are dreams simply meaningless mental noise--"unmusical fingers wandering over the piano keys"? With expertise in philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience, Owen Flanagan is uniquely qualified to answer these questions. In this groundbreaking work, he provides both an accessible survey of the latest research on sleep and dreams and a compelling new theory about the nature (...)
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  10. Deconstructing Dreams: The Spandrels of Sleep.Owen J. Flanagan - 1995 - Journal of Philosophy 92 (1):5-27.
  11. The Reality of Dreams.Oswald Hanfling - 1998 - Philosophical Investigations 21 (4):338-344.
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  12. Dreaming and Imagination.Jonathan Ichikawa - 2009 - Mind and Language 24 (1):103-121.
    Penultimate draft; please refer to published version. I argue, on philosophical, psychological, and neurophysiological grounds, that contrary to an orthodox view, dreams do not typically involve misleading sensations and false beliefs. I am thus in partial agreement with Colin McGinn, who has argued that we do not have misleading sensory experience while dreaming, and partially in agreement with Ernest Sosa, who has argued that we do not form false beliefs while dreaming. Rather, on my view, dreams involve mental imagery and (...)
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  13. Imagination and Epistemology.Jonathan Ichikawa - 2008 - Dissertation, Rutgers University
    Among the tools the epistemologist brings to the table ought to be, I suggest, a firm understanding of the imagination--one that is informed by philosophy of mind, cognitive psychology, and neuroscience. In my dissertation, I highlight several ways in which such an understanding of the imagination can yield insight into traditional questions in epistemology. My dissertation falls into three parts. In Part I, I argue that dreaming should be understood in imaginative terms, and that this has important implications for questions (...)
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  14. The Concept of Dreaming.Norman Malcolm - 1967 - In Harold Morick (ed.), Wittgenstein and the Problem of Other Minds. Humanities Press.
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  15. Dreaming.Norman Malcolm - 1959 - Routledge and Kegan Paul.
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  16. Dreams and Dreaming.Jennifer Windt - unknown
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  17. The Immersive Spatiotemporal Hallucination Model of Dreaming.Jennifer M. Windt - 2010 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (2):295-316.
    The paper proposes a minimal definition of dreaming in terms of immersive spatiotemporal hallucination (ISTH) occurring in sleep or during sleep–wake transitions and under the assumption of reportability. I take these conditions to be both necessary and sufficient for dreaming to arise. While empirical research results may, in the future, allow for an extension of the concept of dreaming beyond sleep and possibly even independently of reportability, ISTH is part of any possible extension of this definition and thus is a (...)
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