The Nature of Perceptual Experience

Edited by Benj Hellie (University of Toronto, St. George, University of Toronto at Scarborough)
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  1. The Common Sense View of Sense-Perception: The Presidential Address.Richard I. Aaron - 1957 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 58:1 - 14.
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  2. A Note on Visual Data in Esthetic Perspective.Virgil C. Aldrich - 1942 - Journal of Philosophy 39 (24):661-663.
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  3. The Theory of Appearing.W. P. Alston - forthcoming - Philosophical Perspectives.
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  4. Back to the Theory of Appearing.William P. Alston - 1999 - Philosophical Perspectives 13 (s13):181--203.
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  5. Immediate Perception.David M. Armstrong - 1976 - In R. S. Cohen, P. K. Feyerabend & M. Wartofsky (eds.), Essays in Memory of Imre Lakatos. Reidel. pp. 23--35.
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  6. Perceiving the Intrinsic Properties of Objects.Ignacio Ávila - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (1):55-71.
    In this paper, I discuss Noë’s enactive account of our perceptual encounter with the intrinsic properties of the surrounding objects. First, I argue that this view falls into a dilemma in which either we are left without a satisfactory explanation of this encounter or, in order to keep Noë’s view, we must abandon our ordinary intuitions about the ontological status of the intrinsic properties of objects. Then, I show that, strikingly, there is a suggestive unofficial strand running in Noë that (...)
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  7. John McDowell by Maximilian de Gaynesford and John McDowell by Tim Thornton.Alexander Bagattini & Marcus Willaschek - 2006 - Philosophical Books 47 (3):281-284.
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  8. Some Suggestions Towards the Construction of a Theory of Sense-Perception.Nikunja Vihari Banerjee - 1930 - Philosophical Review 39 (6):587-596.
  9. Phenomenology and Embodied Action.M. Beaton - 2013 - Constructivist Foundations 8 (3):298-313.
    Context: The enactivist tradition, out of which neurophenomenology arose, rejects various internalisms – including the representationalist and information-processing metaphors – but remains wedded to one further internalism: the claim that the structure of perceptual experience is directly, constitutively linked only to internal, brain-based dynamics. Problem: I aim to reject this internalism and defend an alternative analysis. Method: The paper presents a direct-realist, externalist, sensorimotor account of perceptual experience. It uses the concept of counterfactual meaningful action to defend this view against (...)
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  10. Intentionality, Sense and the Mind.David Bell - 1986 - Philosophical Books 27 (2):107-110.
  11. L'hallucination: 1. Recherches Théoriques.Alfred Binet - 1884 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 17:377 - 412.
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  12. Cornman on Designation Rules.Steven E. Boër - 1974 - Philosophical Studies 26 (3-4):271 - 278.
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  13. Experience, Action and Affordance Perception.Jennifer Elizabeth Booth - unknown
    The aim for this thesis is to motivate, critically evaluate and defend the claim that subjects are able to consciously perceive the affordances of objects. I will present my protagonist, the ‘Conscious Affordance Theorist’, with what are two main obstacles to this claim. The first of these is that affordance perception correctly understood refers only to a kind of subpersonal visual processing, and not to a kind of conscious visual experience. I claim that this results in an explanatory gap at (...)
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  14. Reply to McDowell.Robert Brandom - 2010 - In Bernhard Weiss & Jeremy Wanderer (eds.), Reading Brandom: On Making It Explicit. Routledge.
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  15. A New Defence of the Adverbial Theory.Wylie Breckenridge - manuscript
    I present a new version of the adverbial theory of visual experience, and give a semantic argument for it.
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  16. The Meaning of "Look".Wylie Breckenridge - 2007 - Dissertation, New College, University of Oxford
    My main aim is to clarify what we mean by ‘look’ sentences such as (1) below – ones that we use to talk about visual experience: -/- (1) The ball looked red to Sue -/- This is to help better understand a part of natural language that has so far resisted treatment, and also to help better understand the nature of visual experience. -/- By appealing to general linguistic principles I argue for the following account. First, we use (1) to (...)
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  17. Kant, Polysolipsism, and the Real Unity of Experience.Richard Brown - manuscript
    [written in 2002/2003 while I was a graduate student at the University of Connecticut and ultimately submitted as part of my qualifying exam for the Masters of Philosophy] The question I am interested in revolves around Kant’s notion of the unity of experience. My central claim will be that, apart from the unity of experiencings and the unity of individual substances, there is a third unity: the unity of Experience. I will argue that this third unity can be conceived of (...)
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  18. Seeing, Doing, and Knowing: A Philosophical Theory of Sense Perception, by Mohan Matthen.A. Byrne - 2010 - Mind 119 (476):1206-1210.
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  19. Relational Vs Kantian Responses to Berkeley's Puzzle.John Campbell - 2011 - In Johannes Roessler, Hemdat Lerman & Naomi Eilan (eds.), Perception, Causation, and Objectivity. Oxford University Press.
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  20. Cornman's Definition of Observation Terms.Jack C. Carloye - 1977 - Philosophical Studies 32 (3):283 - 292.
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  21. Intentionalism and the Problem of the Content of Perception.Karla Chediak - 2016 - Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 72 (2-3):519-530.
    In this paper I will discuss the intentionalist view of perception, and present some arguments to support the view that, contrary to Michael Martin’s criticism, intentionalists do not need to conceive the content of perception as either singular or general, because this is not the way that it should be thought. The right way to conceive the representational content of perception is by considering it as informational and functional.
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  22. The Philosophy of James W. Cornman.Victoria Choy - 1982 - Philosophical Studies 41 (1):7 - 29.
  23. Origins of Objectivity, by Tyler Burge. [REVIEW]Rebecca Copenhaver - 2013 - Mind 122 (488):1065-1068.
  24. The Transition From Naïve to Critical Realism.Daniel Cory - 1942 - Journal of Philosophy 39 (10):261-268.
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  25. John McDowell and the Future of Film Studies.Rick Costa - 2014 - Philosophy Study 4 (6).
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  26. U čemu je problem opažanja?Tim Crane - 2006 - Filozofska Istrazivanja 26 (2):257-282.
    Što je distinktivno filozofski problem opažanja? Ovdje se tvrdi da je to konflikt između prirode opažajnog iskustva kakva nam se intuitivno čini, te stanovitih mogućnosti koje su implicitne upravo u ideji iskustva: mogućnosti iluzije i halucinacije. Opažajno iskustvo čini nam se kao odnos prema svojim objektima, vrsta »otvorenosti prema svijetu« koja uključuje izravnu svijest postojećih objekata i njihovih svojstava. Ali ako netko može imati iskustvo iste vrste a da objekt nije tamo – halucinaciju objekta – onda izgleda da opažajno iskustvo (...)
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  27. John Searle and His Critics.Peter Curruthers - 1991 - Mind and Language 6 (4):370-373.
  28. Sensing Change.Barry Dainton - 2008 - Philosophical Issues 18 (1):362-384.
    We can anticipate what is yet to happen, remember what has already happened, but our immediate experience is confined to the present, the here and now. So much seems common sense. So much so that it is no surprise to see Thomas Reid, that pre-eminent champion of common sense in philosophy, advocating precisely this position.
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  29. Descartes and the Puzzle of Sensory Representation.Raffaella De Rosa - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Raffaella De Rosa discusses the theory of sensory perception, especially color perception, offered by Ren Descartes. She offers a detailed overview of the recent literature on the topic and provides a new reading of Descartes' theory; she also raises questions of great interest in the contemporary philosophy of mind and cognitive science.
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  30. Perception From the Phenomenal Stance.Jan Degenaar - forthcoming - Logique Et Analyse.
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  31. On Thinking and the World: John McDowell's.Sandra M. Dingli - 2005 - Ashgate New Critical Thinking in Philosophy.
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  32. Cornman and Philosophy of Science.Zoltan Domotor & Michael Friedman - 1982 - Philosophical Studies 41 (1):115 - 127.
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  33. The Phenomenal Presence of Perceptual Reasons.Fabian Dorsch - forthcoming - In Fabian Dorsch & Fiona Macpherson (eds.), Phenomenal Presence. Oxford University Press.
    Doxasticism about our awareness of normative (i.e. justifying) reasons – the view that we can recognise reasons for forming attitudes or performing actions only by means of normative judgements or beliefs – is incompatible with the following triad of claims: -/- (1) Being motivated (i.e. forming attitudes or performing actions for a motive) requires responding to and, hence, recognising a relevant reason. -/- (2) Infants are capable of being motivated. -/- (3) Infants are incapable of normative judgement or belief. -/- (...)
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  34. Review of Mohan Matthen, Seeing, Doing, and Knowing: A Philosophical Theory of Sense Perception[REVIEW]Fred Dretske - 2005 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (9).
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  35. Perceiving, Sensing, and Knowing. [REVIEW]A. R. E. - 1965 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (1):163-163.
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  36. Images.James Elliott - 2016 - Philosophical Psychology 29 (4):1-4.
  37. Hinton's Later Thought.H. Havelock Ellis - 1884 - Mind 9 (35):384-405.
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  38. Talking About Seeing: An Examination of Some Aspects of the Ayer-Austin Debate on the Sense-Datum Theory.Kathleen Ann Emmett - 1973 - Dissertation, The Ohio State University
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  39. Chapter Eleven Sensing and Thinking Through Technological Tools.Alberto Gatti - 2007 - In Soraj Hongladarom (ed.), Computing and Philosophy in Asia. Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 164.
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  40. Sensing the Observer: Offering an Open Order Cybernetics.Andrea Gaugusch & Bill Seaman - 2004 - Technoetic Arts 2 (1):17-31.
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  41. Consciousness and the Limits of Memory.Joseph Gottlieb - forthcoming - Synthese.
    Representationalism, in its most basic form, is a supervenience claim. In its stronger interesting form, it adds to this supervenience claim an explanatory commitment: necessarily, for any two experiences E and E*, if E and E* are different in their phenomenal character, then there is some difference in representational content between E and E* that renders their phenomenal difference intelligible. Representationalism is popular. Alas, it’s false—or so I claim. My argument appeals to two types of exceptional episodic memory: hyperthymesia or (...)
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  42. The Larger Life: Studies in Hinton's Ethics, with Some Unpubl. Letters of J. Hinton.Caroline Haddon - 1886
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  43. Psychological Data and Philosophical Theory of Perception.Lewis E. Hahn - 1942 - Journal of Philosophy 39 (11):296-301.
  44. A Critical Examination of H. H. Price's Philosophy of Perception as Presented in 'Perception.'.David Baer Hausman - 1971 - Dissertation, The University of Iowa
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  45. III. —Hinton's Later Thought.H. Havelock Ellis - 1884 - Mind (35):384-405.
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  46. SWARTZ, Robert J. .-"Perceiving, Sensing and Knowing: Readings in the Philosophy of Perception". [REVIEW]J. M. Hinton - 1966 - Philosophy 41:362.
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  47. Ethics and Appearance.Donald Clark Hodges - 1954 - Journal of Philosophy 51 (17):481-490.
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  48. Experience and Time: Transparency and Presence.Christoph Hoerl - 2018 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 5:127-151.
    Philosophers frequently comment on the intimate connection there is between something’s being present in perceptual experience and that thing’s being, or at least appearing to be, temporally present. Yet, there is relatively little existing work that goes beyond asserting such a connection and instead examines its specific nature. In this paper, I suggest that we can make progress on the latter by looking at two more specific debates that have hitherto been conducted largely isolation from each other: one about the (...)
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  49. Episodic Memory and Theory of Mind: A Connection Reconsidered.Christoph Hoerl - 2018 - Mind & Language 33 (2):148-160.
    In the literature on episodic memory, one claim that has been made by a number of psychologists, and that is also at least implicit in some of the accounts given by philosophers, is that being able to recollect particular past events in the distinctive way afforded by episodic memory requires the possession of aspects of a theory of mind, such as a grasp of the relationship between one’s present recollective experience and one’s own past perceptual experience of the remembered event. (...)
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  50. 'A Succession of Feelings, in and of Itself, is Not a Feeling of Succession'.Christoph Hoerl - 2013 - Mind 122 (486):373-417.
    Variants of the slogan that a succession of experiences does not amount to an experience of succession are commonplace in the philosophical literature on temporal experience. I distinguish three quite different arguments that might be captured using this slogan: the individuation argument, the unity argument, and the causal argument. Versions of the unity and the causal argument are often invoked in support of a particular view of the nature of temporal experience sometimes called intentionalism, and against a rival view sometimes (...)
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