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  1. What Theoretical Equivalence Could Not Be.Trevor Teitel - 2021 - Philosophical Studies:1-31.
    Formal criteria of theoretical equivalence are mathematical mappings between specific sorts of mathematical objects, notably including those objects used in mathematical physics. Proponents of formal criteria claim that results involving these criteria have implications that extend beyond pure mathematics. For instance, they claim that formal criteria bear on the project of using our best mathematical physics as a guide to what the world is like, and also have deflationary implications for various debates in the metaphysics of physics. In this paper, (...)
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  2. On the Argument From Double Spaces: A Reply to Moti Mizrahi.Seungbae Park - 2021 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 10 (2):1-6.
    Van Fraassen infers the truth of the contextual theory from his observation that it has passed a crucial test. Mizrahi infers the comparative truth of our best theories from his observation that they are more successful than their competitors. Their inferences require, according to the argument from double spaces, the prior belief that it is more likely that their target theories were pulled out from the T-space than from the O-space. The T-space is the logical space of unconceived theories whose (...)
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  3. Understanding and Equivalent Reformulations.Josh Hunt - forthcoming - Philosophy of Science.
    Reformulating a scientific theory often leads to a significantly different way of understanding the world. Nevertheless, accounts of both theoretical equivalence and scientific understanding have neglected this important aspect of scientific theorizing. This essay provides a positive account of how reformulating theories changes our understanding. My account simultaneously addresses a serious challenge facing existing accounts of scientific understanding. These accounts have failed to characterize understanding in a way that goes beyond the epistemology of scientific explanation. By focusing on cases where (...)
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  4. Cutting the Cord: A Corrective for World Navels in Cartography and Science.Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther - 2019 - Cartographic Journal 57 (2):147-159.
    A map is not its territory. Taking a map too seriously may lead to pernicious reification: map and world are conflated. As one family of cases of such reification, I focus on maps exuding the omphalos syndrome, whereby a centred location on the map is taken to be the world navel of, for instance, an empire. I build on themes from my book _When Maps Become the World_, in which I analogize scientific theories to maps, and develop the tools of (...)
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  5. Kant’s Ideal of Systematicity in Historical Context.Hein van den Berg - forthcoming - Kantian Review:1-26.
    This article explains Kant’s claim that sciences must take, at least as their ideal, the form of a ‘system’. I argue that Kant’s notion of systematicity can be understood against the background of de Jong & Betti’s Classical Model of Science (2010) and the writings of Georg Friedrich Meier and Johann Heinrich Lambert. According to my interpretation, Meier, Lambert, and Kant accepted an axiomatic idea of science, articulated by the Classical Model, which elucidates their conceptions of systematicity. I show that (...)
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  6. Models, Metaphors and Analogies.Daniela M. Bailer-Jones - 2002 - In Peter Machamer & Michael Silberstein (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Science. Malden: Blackwell. pp. 108-127.
  7. Metafore, modelli, linguaggio scientifico: il dibattito postempirista.Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 1988 - In Melchiorre Virgilio (ed.), Simbolo e conoscenza. Milan, Italy: VIta e Pensiero. pp. 31-102.
    I discuss Mary Hess’s interaction-view of scientific metaphor, outline an alternative view and show how it may prove fruitful when applied to chapters of the history of science. I start with a reconstruction of the discussion on the nature of scientific models and on their relationship to metaphors that has taken place in the Anglo-Saxon philosophy of Science starting from the Fifties; the discovery started with Stephen Pepper and Kenneth Burke, reaching Thomas Kuhn, Marx Wartofsky, and George Lakoff via Max (...)
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  8. Objašnjenje, evidencija, teorija (Explanation, Evidence, Theory).Daniel Kostic & Dusko Prelevic - 2014 - Belgrade, Serbia: Treći program.
  9. Rolul constitutiv al matematicii in stiinta structurala.Catalin Barboianu - 2017 - Târgu Jiu, Romania: Infarom.
    Problemele filosofie sensibile pe care le pune aplicabilitatea matematicii în ştiinţe şi viaţa de zi cu zi au conturat, pe un fond interdisciplinar, o nouă “ramură” a filosofiei ştiinţei, anume filosofia aplicabilităţii matematicii. Aplicarea cu succes a matematicii de-a lungul istoriei ştiinţei necesită reprezentare, încadrare, explicaţie, dar şi o justificare de ordin metateoretic a aplicabilităţii. Între rolurile matematicii în practica ştiinţifică, rolul constitutiv teoriilor ştiinţifice este cel a cărui analiză poate contribui esenţial la această justificare. În lucrarea de faţă, am (...)
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  10. Filosofia Aplicabilitatii Matematicii: Intre Irational si Rational.Catalin Barboianu - 2018 - Târgu Jiu, Romania: Infarom.
    Lucrarea tratează unul dintre “misterele” filosofiei analitice şi ale raţionalităţii însăşi, anume aplicabilitatea matematicii în ştiinţe şi în investigarea matematică a realităţii înconjurătoare, a cărei filosofie este dezvoltată în jurul sintagmei – de acum paradigmatice – ‘eficacitatea iraţională a matematicii’, aparţinând fizicianului Eugene Wigner, problemă filosofică etichetată în literatură drept “puzzle-ul lui Wigner”. Odată intraţi în profunzimea acestei probleme, investigaţia nu trebuie limitată la căutarea unor răspunsuri explicative la întrebări precum “Ce este de fapt aplicabilitatea matematicii?”, “Cum explicăm prezenţa în (...)
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  11. The Nature of the Structures of Applied Mathematics and the Metatheoretical Justification for the Mathematical Modeling.Catalin Barboianu - 2015 - Romanian Journal of Analytic Philosophy 9 (2):1-32.
    The classical (set-theoretic) concept of structure has become essential for every contemporary account of a scientific theory, but also for the metatheoretical accounts dealing with the adequacy of such theories and their methods. In the latter category of accounts, and in particular, the structural metamodels designed for the applicability of mathematics have struggled over the last decade to justify the use of mathematical models in sciences beyond their 'indispensability' in terms of either method or concepts/entities. In this paper, I argue (...)
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  12. Friedman and Some of His Critics on the Foundations of General Relativity.Ryan Samaroo - 2020 - Einstein Studies 15:133-151.
    The paper is an examination of Michael Friedman’s analysis of the conceptual structure of Einstein’s theory of gravitation, with a particular focus on a number of critical reactions to it. Friedman argues that conceptual frameworks in physics are stratified, and that a satisfactory analysis of a framework requires us to recognize the differences in epistemological character of its components. He distinguishes first-level principles that define a framework of empirical investigation from second-level principles that are formulable in that framework. On his (...)
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  13. Newtonian Mechanics and its Philosophical Significance.Ryan Samaroo - forthcoming - In Eleanor Knox & A. Wilson (eds.), Routledge Companion to the Philosophy of Physics. London, UK: Routledge.
    Newtonian mechanics is more than just an empirically successful theory of matter in motion: it is an account of what knowledge of the physical world should look like. But what is this account? What is distinctive about it? To answer these questions, I begin by introducing the laws of motion, the relations among them, and the spatio-temporal framework that is implicit in them. Then I turn to the question of their methodological character. This has been the locus of philosophical discussion (...)
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  14. Henri Poincaré and Charles Renouvier on Conventions; or, How Science Is Like Politics.Warren Schmaus - 2017 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 7 (2):182-198.
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  15. The Contemporary State of Philosophy of Science in Britain.Colin Howson & John Worrall - 1974 - Zeitschrift Für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 5 (2):363-374.
    Some of the problem areas in which British philosophers of science have recently been engaged are described and some of the major contributions noted. Two sets of problems are given special attention: one concerned with the analysis of probability statements and one concerned with the appraisal of scientific theories. Three traditions in the approach to this second set of problems are distinguished. These might be called the Carnapian, the Popperian and the Wittgensteinian traditions.
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  16. A Functional Analysis of Scientific Theories.Harold I. Brown - 1979 - Zeitschrift Für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 10 (1):119-140.
    Scientific theories are analyzed in terms of the role that they play in science rather than in terms of their logical structure. It is maintained that theories: provide descriptions of the fundamental features of their domains; on the basis of 1, explain non-fundamental features of their domains; provide a guide for further research in their domains. Any set of propositions that carries out these functions with respect to some domain counts as a theory. This view of theories is developed and (...)
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  17. Some Disputed Aspects of Inertia, with Particular Reference to the Equivalence Principle.Ryan Samaroo - 2013 - Dissertation, The University of Western Ontario
    This thesis is a contribution to the foundations of space-time theories. It examines the proper understanding of the Newtonian and 1905 inertial frame concepts and the critical analysis of these concepts that was motivated by the equivalence principle. This is the hypothesis that it is impossible to distinguish locally between a homogeneous gravitational field and a uniformly accelerated frame. The three essays that comprise this thesis address, in one way or another, the criteria through which the inertial frame concepts are (...)
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  18. Van Fraassen Meets Popper: Logical Relations and Cognitive Abilities.Harold I. Brown - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (2):381-385.
    Van Fraassen, like Popper before him, assumes that confirmation and disconfirmation relations are logical relations and thus hold only among abstract items. This raises a problem about how experience, for Popper, and observables, for van Fraassen, enter into epistemic evaluations. Each philosopher offers a drastic proposal: Popper holds that basic statements are accepted by convention; van Fraassen introduces his “pragmatic tautology.” Another alternative is to reject the claim that all evaluative relations are logical relations. Ayer proposed this option in responding (...)
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  19. Understanding: Art and Science.Catherine Z. Elgin - 1993 - Synthese 95 (1):13-28.
    The arts and the sciences perform many of the same cognitive functions, both serving to advance understanding. This paper explores some of the ways exemplification operates in the two fields. Both scientific experiments and works of art highlight, underscore, display, or convey some of their own features. They thereby focus attention on them, and make them available for examination and projection. Thus, the Michelson-Morley experiment exemplifies the constancy of the speed of light. Jackson Pollock's "Number One" exemplifies the viscosity of (...)
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  20. Methodology, Epistemology, and Philosophy: Essays in Honour of Wolfgang Stegmüller on the Occasion of His 60th Birthday.Brent Mundy - 1989 - Philosophy of Science 56 (2):361-362.
  21. The Semantic View, Empirical Adequacy, and Application.Mauricio Suárez - 2005 - Critica 37 (109):29-63.
    It is widely accepted in contemporary philosophy of science that the domain of application of a theory is typically larger than its explanatory covering power: theories can be applied to phenomena that they do not explain. I argue for an analogous thesis regarding the notion of empirical adequacy. A theory's domain of application is typically larger than its domain of empirical adequacy: theories are often applied to phenomena from which they receive no empirical confirmation. \\\ Existe en la filosofía de (...)
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  22. Coherence Between Theories.Mohamed Elsamahi - 2005 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 35 (2):331-352.
    Conceptual merits of a theory are important for its acceptance. According to the traditionally held view, theory acceptance depends mainly on empirical support or confirmation. This paper argues that a new theory has also to cohere with already accepted theories to be accepted. In other words, confirmation alone is insufficient for acceptance. Coherence, like simplicity and internal consistency, is a conceptual merit. Coherence between theories, according to this paper, consists in agreement on the main concepts and mutual support. That is, (...)
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  23. Pierre Duhem and the Inconsistency Between Instrumentalism and Natural Classification.Sonia Maria Dion - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (1):12-19.
    To consider Pierre Duhem’s conception of natural classification as the aim of physical theory, along with his instrumentalist view on its nature, sets up an inconsistency in his philosophy of science which has not yet been solved. This paper argues that to solve it we have to take Duhem on his own terms and that a solution can only be found by interpreting his philosophy as an articulated system which necessarily involves the following connections: 1. The association of natural classification (...)
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  24. Peter Vickers: Understanding Inconsistent Science. [REVIEW]Mathias Frisch - 2016 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 67 (3):913-918.
  25. The Nature and Function of Scientific Theories. Essays in Contemporary Science and Philosophy. Robert G. Colodny.J. E. Bolzan - 1972 - Isis 63 (2):256-257.
  26. Appendix: Theory and Observation.Nenad Miscevic - 2000 - In Rationality and Cognition: Against Relativism-Pragmatism. University of Toronto Press. pp. 233-276.
  27. Do We Need a ‘Theory’ of Development?: Alessandro Minelli and Thomas Pradeu : Towards a Theory of Development. Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2014, 304 Pp, $125 , ISBN 978-0-19-967142-7.Ingo Brigandt - 2016 - Biology and Philosophy 31 (4):603-617.
    Edited by Alessandro Minelli and Thomas Pradeu, Towards a Theory of Development gathers essays by biologists and philosophers, which display a diversity of theoretical perspectives. The discussions not only cover the state of art, but broaden our vision of what development includes and provide pointers for future research. Interestingly, all contributors agree that explanations should not just be gene-centered, and virtually none use design and other engineering metaphors to articulate principles of cellular and organismal organization. I comment in particular on (...)
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  28. Second Order Science: Putting the Metaphysics Back Into the Practice of Science.Michael Lissack -
    The traditional sciences have always had trouble with ambiguity. Through the imposition of “enabling constraints” -- making a set of assumptions and then declaring ceteris paribus -- science can bracket away ambiguity. These enabling constraints take the form of uncritically examined presuppositions or “uceps.” Second order science examines variations in values assumed for these uceps and looks at the resulting impacts on related scientific claims. After rendering explicit the role of uceps in scientific claims, the scientific method is used to (...)
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  29. Symptoms of Unknown Origin: A Medical Odyssey.Clifton K. Meador - 2005
  30. Disease and its Control the Shaping of Modern Thought.Robert P. Hudson - 1983
    This book is . . . a survey history of medicine from the earliest times, centered thematically on how changing concepts of disease have affected its management. . . . One finds a gratifying mastery of recent as well as classic scholarship in medical history and a careful sidestepping of positivistic excesses. . . . Disease and Its Control is a fresh and welcome synthesis of historical scholarship that will be accessible to interested laymen. (Annals of Internal Medicine).
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  31. Marian Przelecki, "The Logic of Empirical Theories". [REVIEW]John Nicholas - 1972 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 3 (2):194-195.
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  32. Theories of Science.L. J. Russell - 1929 - Philosophy 4 (16):504-514.
    I noted two directions in which the scientific worker is seeking to advance. He is trying to give a more complete account of the actual detail of what is happening, and he is seeking wider and wider generalizations. As an observer, he must note what he observes, and, it would seem, omit nothing. But in seeking generalizations he must select, from among the features he observes, only those which he takes to be of general significance. Thence arises at least the (...)
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  33. Theories in Contexts on the Interpretation of Scientific Theories.Tihamér Margitay - 1998
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  34. Robert C. Colodny , "The Nature and Function of Scientific Theories, Essays in Contemporary Science and Philosophy".Hugh Lehman - 1974 - Theory and Decision 4 (3/4):385.
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  35. The Validation of Scientific Theories. [REVIEW]R. D. - 1957 - Review of Metaphysics 10 (4):718-718.
    This book brings together a series of papers presented at the 1953 meeting in Boston of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and published in various issues of The Scientific Monthly. The papers deal with the criteria for scientific theories, operationalism, psychoanalysis, organism and machine, and science as a social and historical phenomenon. The contributors are particularly well-chosen. -- D. R.
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  36. Review Of: Christopher G. Timpson, Quantum Information Theory and the Foundations of Quantum Mechanics. [REVIEW]Michael E. Cuffaro - 2014 - Philosophy of Science 81 (4):681-684,.
  37. About Limits of Growth for Scientific Theories.Kuno Lorenz - 1981 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 12 (1):79-83.
    If self-determination shall apply as a norm also to scientific research and presentation, there are beside empirical limitations regarding data production, also conceptual limitations to data processing, because nobody can rely on knowledge by firsthand authority only. A transfer-condition (knowledge by n-th hand authority should " in principle" be available by first-hand authority) in order to save scientific rationality is shown to be equivalent with following "open" discourses, i.e. argumentations which combine competition and cooperation through developing the means to overcome (...)
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  38. Credentialing Scientific Claims.Frederick Suppe - 1993 - Perspectives on Science 1 (2):153-203.
  39. Model Part of a Scientific Theory.Mark Burgin & Vladimir Kuznetsov - 1992 - Epistemologia 15 (1):98-125.
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  40. Is Evolutionism a Scientific Theory?Z. Piatek - 1994 - Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science 160:167-167.
  41. Jerzy Giedymin-From the Logic of Science to the Theoretical History of Science.Krystyna Zamiara - 2001 - Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 74:173-184.
  42. Reconsidering the Received View of the 'Received View': Kant, Kuhn, and the Demise of Positivist Philosophy of Science.D. Wade Hands - 2003 - Social Epistemology 17 (2-3):169-173.
  43. Rooks Received.Robert P. George & Natural Law - 1999 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 73 (4).
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  44. Metaphilosophy and the History of the Philosophy of Science-The Structure of Scientific Theories Thirty Years On-Understanding Scientific Theories: An Assessment of Developments, 1969-1998. [REVIEW]Nick Huggett, Steven French & Frederick Suppe - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (3).
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  45. Laws, Theories, and Generalizations.Ronald Giere - 1988 - In A. Grünbaum & W. Salmon (eds.), The Limits of Deductivism. University of California Press, Berkeley, Ca. pp. 37--46.
  46. Laws and Theories.Mary Hesse - 1967 - In Paul Edwards (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Philosophy. New York: Macmillan. pp. 4--404.
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  47. Structures of Scientific Theories1.Carl F. Craver - 2002 - In Peter Machamer Michael Silberstein (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Science. Blackwell. pp. 7--55.
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  48. Techniques and Methods of Science From a Structuralist Point of View.Martin Rotter - 2003 - In Benedikt Löwe, Thoralf Räsch & Wolfgang Malzkorn (eds.), Foundations of the Formal Sciences Ii. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 213--234.
  49. Using Conceptual Spaces to Model the Dynamics of Empirical Theories.Peter Gärdenfors & Frank Zenker - 2011 - In Erik J. Olson Sebastian Enqvist (ed.), Belief Revision Meets Philosophy of Science. Springer. pp. 137--153.
  50. The Problem of Philosophical Assumptions and Consequences of Science.Jan Wolenski - 2011 - Studia Philosophiae Christianae 47 (4):117-134.
    This paper argues that science is not dependent on philosophical assumption and does not entail philosophical consequences. The concept of dependence and entailment is understood logically, that is, are defined via consequence operation. Speaking more colloquially, the derivation of scientific theorems does not use philosophical statements as premises and one cannot derive philosophical theses from scientific assertions. This does not mean that science and philosophy are completely separated. In particular, sciences leads to some philosophical insights, but it must be preceded (...)
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