About this topic
Summary

There are three questions structuring the debate on perceptual relations. One question concerns the connection between perceptual relations to the environment and the representational content of experiences. Are perceptual relations or perceptual representations more fundamental in an account of the nature of perceptual experience? Austere relationalists have it that perceptual relations to the environment are more fundamental than any representations. Austere representationalists have it that representations are more fundamental than any perceptual relations to the environment. Hybrid views have it that perceptual experience is fundamentally both relational and representational. A second question is whether we are perceptually related to particulars or universals. Direct realists have it that we are perceptually related to particulars such as objects, events, and property-instances in our environment. Likewise, sense-data theorists have it that we are related to particulars, but understand the particulars in play to be strange particulars, namely sense-data. While it is compatible with a representationalist view to hold that we are perceptually related to particulars in our environment, at least some representationalists have it that we are perceptually related to properties and so to universals rather than particulars. A third question concerns the nature of the relation. Is the perceptual relation a causal relation, is it a sensory relation such as an awareness relation, or is it an epistemic relation such as an acquaintance relation?

Key works Brewer 2011Campbell 2002, Dretske 1981
Introductions Crane 2006Schellenberg 2010
Related categories

621 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 621
Material to categorize
  1. Knowledge and Representations: Explaining the Skeptical Puzzle.Guido Melchior - 2017 - In C. Limbeck-Lilienau and F. Stadler (ed.), The Philosophy of Perception and Observation. Papers of the 40th International Wittgenstein Symposium. pp. 150-152.
    (*This paper was awarded the Elisabeth and Werner Leinfellner Award 2017 for outstanding contributions.) -/- This paper provides an explanation of the skeptical puzzle. I argue that we can take two distinct points of view towards representations, mental representations like perceptual experiences and artificial representations like symbols. When focusing on what the representation represents we take an attached point of view. When focusing on the representational character of the representation we take a detached point view. From an attached point of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Book Review of Perception, Realism, and the Problem of Reference. [REVIEW]Jennifer Matey - 2012 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 1.
  3. The Good, the Bad and the Naive.Michael Schmitz - 2019 - In Christoph Limbeck-Lilienau & Friedrich Stadler (eds.), The Philosophy of Perception. Berlin: De Gruyter. pp. 57-74.
    A perceptual realism that is naive in a good way must be naively realistic about world and mind. But contemporary self-described naive realists often have trouble acknowledging that both the good cases of successful perception and the bad cases of illusion and hallucination involve internal experiential states with intentional contents that present the world as being a certain way. They prefer to think about experience solely in relational terms because they worry that otherwise we won’t be able to escape from (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Daubert’s Naïve Realist Challenge to Husserl.Matt E. M. Bower - 2019 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 96 (2):211-243.
    Despite extensive discussion of naïve realism in the wider philosophical literature, those influenced by the phenomenological movement who work in the philosophy of perception have hardly weighed in on the matter. It is thus interesting to discover that Edmund Husserl’s close philosophical interlocutor and friend, the early twentieth-century phenomenologist Johannes Daubert, held the naive realist view. This article presents Daubert’s views on the fundamental nature of perceptual experience and shows how they differ radically from those of Husserl’s. The author argues, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. From Sensorimotor Dependencies to Perceptual Practices: Making Enactivism Social.Alejandro Arango - 2018 - Adaptive Behavior 27 (1):31-45.
    Proponents of enactivism should be interested in exploring what notion of action best captures the type of action-perception link that the view proposes, such that it covers all the aspects in which our doings constitute and are constituted by our perceiving. This article proposes and defends the thesis that the notion of sensorimotor dependencies is insufficient to account for the reality of human perception, and that the central enactive notion should be that of perceptual practices. Sensorimotor enactivism is insufficient because (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Elusive Objects.M. Martin - 2017 - Topoi 36 (2):247-271.
    Do we directly perceive physical objects? What is the significance of the qualification ‘directly’ here? Austin famously denied that there was a unique interpretation by which we could make sense of the traditional debate in the philosophy of perception. I look here at Thompson Clarke’s discussion of G. E. Moore and surface perception to answer Austin’s scepticism.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  7. Camouflaged Physical Objects: The Intentionality of Perception.Manuel Liz - 2006 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 21 (2):165-184.
    This paper is about perception and its objects. My aim is to suggest a new way to articulate some of the central ideas of direct realism. Sections 1 and 2 offer from different perspectives a panoramic view of the main problems and options in the philosophy of perception. Section 3 introduces the notion of “camouflage” as an interesting and promising alternative in order to explain the nature of the intentional objects of perception. Finally, section 4 makes use of this new (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. 2. Causal Theories of Objects and Grice’s Causal Theory of Perception.Robert Greenberg - 2016 - In The Bounds of Freedom: Kant’s Causal Theory of Action. De Gruyter. pp. 14-40.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. The Direct Relational Model of Object Perception.Nicolas J. Bullot - unknown
    This text aims at presenting a general characterization of the act of perceiving a particular object, in a framework in which perception is conceived of as a mental and cognitive faculty having specific functions that other faculties such as imagination and memory do not possess. I introduce the problem of determining the occurrence of singular perception of a physical object, as opposed to the occurrence of other mental states or attitudes. I propose that clarifying this occurrence problem requires making explicit (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. The Causal Theory of Perception.H. P. Grice & Alan R. White - 1961 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 35 (1):121-168.
  11. The Causal Theory of Perception.A. J. Ayer & L. J. Cohen - 1977 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 51 (1):105-142.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12. XI—Perception, Vision and Causation.Paul Snowdon - 1981 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 81 (1):175-192.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   61 citations  
  13. Two Causation/Perception Constructions in French.Michel Achard - 1996 - Cognitive Linguistics 7 (4):315-358.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. The Phenomenal Presence of Perceptual Reasons.Fabian Dorsch - forthcoming - In Fabian Dorsch & Fiona Macpherson (eds.), Phenomenal Presence. Oxford University Press.
    Doxasticism about our awareness of normative (i.e. justifying) reasons – the view that we can recognise reasons for forming attitudes or performing actions only by means of normative judgements or beliefs – is incompatible with the following triad of claims: -/- (1) Being motivated (i.e. forming attitudes or performing actions for a motive) requires responding to and, hence, recognising a relevant reason. -/- (2) Infants are capable of being motivated. -/- (3) Infants are incapable of normative judgement or belief. -/- (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15. Are the Senses Silent? Travis’s Argument From Looks.Keith A. Wilson - 2018 - In John Collins & Tamara Dobler (eds.), The Philosophy of Charles Travis: Language, Thought, and Perception. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. pp. 199-221.
    Many philosophers and scientists take perceptual experience, whatever else it involves, to be representational. In ‘The Silence of the Senses’, Charles Travis argues that this view involves a kind of category mistake, and consequently, that perceptual experience is not a representational or intentional phenomenon. The details of Travis’s argument, however, have been widely misinterpreted by his representationalist opponents, many of whom dismiss it out of hand. This chapter offers an interpretation of Travis’s argument from looks that it is argued presents (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  16. Narrative and Direct Experience: A Dialogue on Metaphysical Realism.Ernest John McCullough - 2014 - In Louis F. Groarke & Paolo C. Biondi (eds.), Shifting the Paradigm: Alternative Perspectives on Induction. De Gruyter. pp. 359-384.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Direct Realism Revisited;or No One Asked Aristotle The Right Question.Brian O'neil - 1974 - Southwest Philosophical Studies.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. The Perception of Causality.A. Michotte, T. R. Miles & Elaine Miles - 1964 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 15 (59):254-259.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   229 citations  
  19. Direct Awareness.Mark Alan Levensky - 1966 - Dissertation, University of Michigan
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Direct Perception in Mathematics: A Case for Epistemological Priority.Bart Kerkhove & Erik Myin - 2002 - Logique Et Analyse 45.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Moltke S. Gram, Direct Realism: A Study of Perception. [REVIEW]Georges Dicker - 1985 - Philosophy in Review 5:196-198.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Unidentified Performing Objects: Perception, Phenomenology, and the Object as Actor.Wanda Mary Strukus - 2002 - Dissertation, Tufts University
    Most theories of theater assume a relationship or bond between the human actor on stage and the human beings in the audience. The biological and physical similarities between the two groups of human beings, and the experience, thought, and emotion based on these similarities, are central to the phenomena of theater. Human-to-human interconnectedness enables an audience member to feel something in response to an actor. Object theater is a genre in which the primary agents of performance are objects, such as (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. The Role of Object-Dependent Singular Thought in Visual Cognition.Gregory David Gilson - 1998 - Dissertation, The University of Wisconsin - Madison
    This dissertation investigates various theoretical defenses or explanations which have been provided to the classic philosophic question: what are the objects of perception? Traditionally two general answers have been provided: direct and indirect realism. Direct realists maintain that the objects of perception are external, medium sized material objects. The arguments from illusion and secondary qualities are thought to provide counterexamples to this common sense approach. Indirect realism has grown out of the perceived difficulty posed by illusions and secondary qualities. According (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. The Grice Problem: A Critical Analysis of the Causal Theory of Perception.S. S. Dadzie - 1987 - Dissertation, Temple University
    The essay examines H. P. Grice's attempt to formulate the necessary and sufficient conditions of perceiving in purely causal terms. It involves appraisal of P. F. Strawson's criticism of the thesis as inherently circular; George Pitcher's defence of it against Strawson's challenge; Alvin I. Goldman's Historical Reliabilism, a causal-cum-belief theory of knowledge which had started off as a strictly Gricean analysis; and, finally, Donald Davidson's theory of the explanation of action which construes reasons as causes and, hence, explanation by reasons (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. A Causal Theory of Perception.Harold Irwin Brown - 1970 - Dissertation, Northwestern University
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. A Direct Attribution Theory of Perceptual Knowledge.Jong-ho Ha - 1988 - Dissertation, Brown University
    My purposes in this dissertation are to defend Chisholm's direct attribution theory as a theory of reference and intentionality and to propose a revised version of that theory with respect to the problems of perception and epistemic justification in perceptual knowledge. The direct attribution theory of reference has a remarkable merit that it can solve some theoretical difficulties with other theories of reference and explain comprehensively our intentional acts. Although I accept Chisholm's viewpoint on reference and intentionality, however, I disagree (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. RAM, M. S.: "Direct Realism". [REVIEW]B. Maund - 1985 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 63:538.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. The Nature and Reality of Objects of Perception.G. E. Moore - 1906 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 6:68.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  29. A Theory of Direct Realism.J. E. Turner - 1927 - Philosophical Review 36 (1):76-80.
  30. Perception: A Representative Theory. [REVIEW]E. C. R. - 1978 - Review of Metaphysics 31 (4):675-677.
    Frank Jackson’s defense of a Lockean representationalist theory of perception is both tightly and boldly argued. It is a first-rate analytic dissection of the relevant arguments for and objections against the representationalist position and takes up swords with D. M. Armstrong, J. J. C. Smart, G. J. Warnock, Aune, Anscombe, Price, and others, with meticulous care. It is equally forthright in accepting and defending implications of the theory which have heretofore, for one reason or another, caused the less clear and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Moral Perception and Particularity by Lawrence A. Blum. [REVIEW]David McNaughton - 1996 - Journal of Philosophy 93 (2):89-92.
  32. Causal Relations in Visual Perception in Naturalistic Epistemology: A Symposium of Two Decades.J. Heffner - 1987 - Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science 100:193-214.
  33. Is Perception Direct-Evidence From a Primed Matching Paradigm.S. E. Palmer & A. B. Sekuler - 1988 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 26 (6):487-487.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. The Perception of Object Size is Independent of Object Distance.R. N. Haber & C. A. Levin - 1992 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 30 (6):440-440.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Moltke S. Gram, Direct Realism: A Study of Perception Reviewed By.Georges Dicker - 1985 - Philosophy in Review 5 (5):196-198.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Direct Practice.Iris Carlton-LaNey & Janice Andrews - 1998 - In Josefina Figueira-McDonough, Ann Nichols-Casebolt & F. Ellen Netting (eds.), The Role of Gender in Practice Knowledge: Claiming Half the Human Experience. Garland. pp. 1086--93.
  37. Perception, Conception, and the Limits of the Direct Theory.Peter Machamer & Lisa Osbeck - 2002 - In R. E. Auxier & L. E. Hahn (eds.), The Philosophy of Marjorie Grene. La Salle, Illinois: Open Court. pp. 29--129.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38. 1 The Case for Indirect Realism.Harold I. Brown - 2008 - In Edmond Wright (ed.), The Case for Qualia. MIT Press. pp. 45.
  39. 1Q Object Perception.Elizabeth S. Spelke - 1993 - In Alvin Goldman (ed.), Readings in Philosophy and Cognitive Science. Cambridge: MIT Press. pp. 447.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Object Perception.Elizabeth S. Spelke - 1993 - In Alvin Goldman (ed.), Readings in Philosophy and Cognitive Science. Cambridge: MIT Press.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  41. 1 Strawson's Rationale for the Causal Theory of Perception.Johannes Roessler - 2011 - In Johannes Roessler, Hemdat Lerman & Naomi Eilan (eds.), Perception, Causation, and Objectivity. Oxford University Press. pp. 103.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. In Defence of Direct Perception Through Language.Mikhail Kissine - 2009 - In Jesus M. Larrazabal & Larraitz Zubeldia (eds.), Meaning, Content and Argument. University of the Basque Country Press. pp. 365--381.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Development of Causal Perception.L. M. Oakes - 2003 - In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group. pp. 1--456.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Causality and the Perception of Time.David M. Eagleman & Alex O. Holcombe - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (8):323-325.
  45. Object Perception and Object Naming in Early Development.Barbara Landau, Linda Smith & Susan Jones - 1998 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (1):19-24.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  46. Animal-Environment Mutuality and Direct Perception.Sandra S. Prindle, Claudia Carello & M. T. Turvey - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (3):395-397.
  47. Perceptual Activity and Direct Perception.William M. Mace - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (3):392-393.
  48. Why Argue About Direct Perception?J. J. Koenderink - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (3):390-391.
  49. Direct Perception or Mediated Perception: A Comparison of Rival Viewpoints.William Epstein - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (3):384-385.
  50. Direct Perception and a Call for Primary Perception.Bruce Bridgeman - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (3):382-383.
1 — 50 / 621