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  1. Empathy, Neural Imaging and the Theory Versus Simulation Debate.Frederick R. Adams - 2001 - Mind and Language 16 (4):368-392.
  2. Psychological Explanation: Tacit Theory or Simulation?Angela Joan Arkway - 1995 - Dissertation, City University of New York
    In this dissertation an attempt is made to find a satisfactory account of the nature of commonsense psychological explanation of behavior. The starting point is the current debate in philosophy of mind between the theory theory of folk psychology and the simulation theory. The discussion in the first chapter shows that although simulationists claim that their view can replace the theory theory across the board, their arguments are directed merely at the strand of the theory theory that is to do (...)
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  3. A Unified Account of General Learning Mechanisms and Theory‐of‐Mind Development.Theodore Bach - 2014 - Mind and Language 29 (3):351-381.
    Modularity theorists have challenged that there are, or could be, general learning mechanisms that explain theory-of-mind development. In response, supporters of the ‘scientific theory-theory’ account of theory-of-mind development have appealed to children's use of auxiliary hypotheses and probabilistic causal modeling. This article argues that these general learning mechanisms are not sufficient to meet the modularist's challenge. The article then explores an alternative domain-general learning mechanism by proposing that children grasp the concept belief through the progressive alignment of relational structure that (...)
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  4. Psychological Concept Acquisition.Theodore Bach - 2013 - In N. Payette (ed.), Connected Minds: Cognition and Interaction in the Social World. Cambridge Scholars Press.
    This essay adjudicates between theoretical models of psychological concept acquisition. I provide new reasons to be skeptical about both simulationist and modularist models. I then defend the scientific-theory-theory account against familiar objections. I conclude by arguing that the scientific-theory-theory account must be supplemented by an account of hypothesis discovery.
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  5. Structure-Mapping: Directions From Simulation to Theory.Theodore Bach - 2011 - Philosophical Psychology 24 (1):23-51.
    The theory of mind debate has reached a “hybrid consensus” concerning the status of theory-theory and simulation-theory. Extant hybrid models either specify co-dependency and implementation relations, or distribute mentalizing tasks according to folk-psychological categories. By relying on a non-developmental framework these models fail to capture the central connection between simulation and theory. I propose a “dynamic” hybrid that is informed by recent work on the nature of similarity cognition. I claim that Gentner’s model of structure-mapping allows us to understand simulation (...)
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  6. Pornography as Simulation.Theodore Bach - 2010 - In Dave Monroe (ed.), Pornography: Philosophy for Everyone.
    This essay explains the prevalence of porn consumption by modeling it as a form of simulation. According to simulation theory (Gordon 1986, Goldman 2006) people predict and explain other’s behavior by using their own mind to model the mind of a target individual, much like an engineer might use a model aircraft to simulate the behavior of an actual aircraft. However, the cognitive mechanisms required for simulation have application outside of psychological interpretation. For example, it is plausible that while consuming (...)
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  7. Rethinking Commonsense Psychology: A Critique of Folk Psychology, Theory of Mind and Simulation - by Matthew Ratcliffe.James Baillie - 2008 - Philosophical Books 49 (2):172-175.
  8. Simulation is Not Enough: A Hybrid Model of Disgust Attribution on the Basis of Visual Stimuli.Luca Barlassina - 2013 - Philosophical Psychology 26 (3):401-419.
    Mindreading is the ability to attribute mental states to other individuals. According to the Theory-Theory (TT), mindreading is based on one's possession of a Theory of Mind. On the other hand, the Simulation Theory (ST) maintains that one arrives at the attribution of a mental state by simulating it in one's own mind. In this paper, I propose a ST-TT hybrid model of the ability to attribute disgust on the basis of visual stimuli such as facial expressions, body postures, etc. (...)
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  9. After All, It’s Still Replication: A Reply to Jacob on Simulation and Mirror Neurons.Luca Barlassina - 2011 - Res Cogitans 8 (1):92-111.
    Mindreading is the ability to attribute mental states to other individuals. According to the simulation theory (ST), mindreading is based on the ability the mind has of replicating others' mental states and processes. Mirror neurons (MNs) are a class of neurons that fire both when an agent performs a goal-directed action and when she observes the same type of action performed by another individual. Since MNs appear to form a replicative mechanism in which a portion of the observer's brain replicates (...)
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  10. Folk Psychology as Mental Simulation.Luca Barlassina & Robert M. Gordon - 2017 - The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Mindreading (or folk psychology, Theory of Mind, mentalizing) is the capacity to represent and reason about others’ mental states. The Simulation Theory (ST) is one of the main approaches to mindreading. ST draws on the common-sense idea that we represent and reason about others’ mental states by putting ourselves in their shoes. More precisely, we typically arrive at representing others’ mental states by simulating their mental states in our own mind. This entry offers a detailed analysis of ST, considers theoretical (...)
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  11. Reading Other Minds.Allison Lyn Barnes - 1998 - Dissertation, University of Waterloo (Canada)
    This thesis describes how we are best able to understand the experiences of other people. I present and defend a new theory of mental state attribution, a theory named emotional simulation. Emotional simulation identifies the process by which we gain reliable knowledge of the disparate mental states of other people. ;Many philosophical and social scientific studies of human interaction naively assume that we can know the mental states of others. A solution to the philosophical problem of other minds is required (...)
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  12. Baudriflora: Celebrating History in the Heart of Simulation.Claudia Barnett & Robert L. Davis - 1993 - American Journal of Semiotics 10 (1/2):245-269.
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  13. From Folk Psychology to Folk Epistemology: The Status of Radical Simulation.Benjamin Bayer - manuscript
    In this paper I consider one of the leading philosophic-psychological theories of “folk psychology,” the simulation theory of Robert Gordon. According to Gordon, we attribute mental states to others not by representing those states or by applying the generalizations of theory, but by imagining ourselves in the position of a target to be interpreted and exploiting our own decision-making skills to make assertions which we then attribute to others as ‘beliefs’. I describe a leading objections to Gordon’s theory—the problem of (...)
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  14. Bildliche Darstellung und die Simulation der Wahrnehmung.Alexander Becker - 2011 - Zeitschrift für Ästhetik Und Allgemeine Kunstwissenschaft 56 (2):217-240.
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  15. Expertise and the Mental Simulation of Action.Sian L. Beilock & Ian M. Lyons - 2012 - In Keith D. Markman, William M. P. Klein & Julie A. Suhr (eds.), Handbook of Imagination and Mental Simulation. Psychology Press.
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  16. Introspection and Mindreading as Mental Simulation.Paul Bello & Marcello Guarini - 2010 - In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society. pp. 2022--2028.
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  17. Re-Enactment and Simulation: Toward a Synthesis of What Type?Berger René & Walker R. Scott - 1989 - Diogenes 37 (147):1-22.
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  18. Re-Enactment and Simulation: Toward a Synthesis of What Type?R. Berger & R. Scott Walker - 1989 - Diogenes 37 (147):1-22.
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  19. From Simulation to Theory.Paul Bernier - 2002 - In Jerome Dokic & Joelle Proust (eds.), Simulation and Knowledge of Action. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
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  20. Rediscovering Empathy – Agency, Folk Psychology, and the Human Sciences – by Karsten R. Stueber.Christian Beyer - 2008 - Dialectica 62 (1):123–128.
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  21. Mentale Simulation Und Radikale Interpretation.Christian Beyer - 2006 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 70 (1):25-45.
    The notion of empathy has more recently seen a considerable revival—notably (first) in connection with Quine's empathy model of radical interpretation, in contrast to which Davidson has developed his triangulation model, and (secondly) in the context of the debate between simulation theory vs. theory theory about propositional attitude ascription. So far, these debates have been carried on fairly independently of each other. This paper is an attempt to utilize the interpretation-theoretical discussion in order to argue for a moderate version of (...)
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  22. Simulation and the We-Mode. A Cognitive Account of Plural First Persons.Matteo Bianchin - 2015 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 45 (4-5):442-461.
    In this article, I argue that a capacity for mindreading conceived along the line of simulation theory provides the cognitive basis for forming we-centric representations of actions and goals. This explains the plural first personal stance displayed by we-intentions in terms of the underlying cognitive processes performed by individual minds, while preserving the idea that they cannot be analyzed in terms of individual intentional states. The implication for social ontology is that this makes sense of the plural subjectivity of joint (...)
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  23. The Phenomenal Mindreader: A Case for Phenomenal Simulation.Stephen Biggs - 2007 - Philosophical Psychology 20 (1):29-42.
    This paper specifies two hypotheses that are intimated in recent research on empathy and mindreading. The first, the phenomenal simulation hypothesis, holds that those attributing mental states (i.e., mindreaders) sometimes simulate the phenomenal states of those to whom they are making attributions (i.e., targets). The second, the phenomenal mindreading hypothesis, holds that this phenomenal simulation plays an important role in some mental state attributions. After explicating these hypotheses, the paper focuses on the first. It argues that neuropsychological experiments on empathy (...)
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  24. Theory, Observation, and Drama.Simon W. Blackburn - 1992 - Mind and Language 7 (1-2):187-203.
  25. If Mirror Neurons Are the Answer, What Was the Question?Emma Borg - 2007 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (8):5-19.
    Mirror neurons are neurons which fire in two distinct conditions: (i) when an agent performs a specific action, like a precision grasp of an object using fingers, and (ii) when an agent observes that action performed by another. Some theorists have suggested that the existence of such neurons may lend support to the simulation approach to mindreading (e.g. Gallese and Goldman, 1998, 'Mirror neurons and the simulation theory of mind reading'). In this note I critically examine this suggestion, in both (...)
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  26. Review: Recent Work in Folk Psychology. [REVIEW]George Botterill - 1994 - Philosophical Quarterly 44 (175):246 - 251.
  27. Simulation of Individual and Social Action. Reply to Hurley.Ingar Brinck - unknown
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  28. If the Motor System is No Mirror'.Maria Brincker - 2012 - In Payette (ed.), Connected Minds: Cognition and Interaction in the Social World. Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 158--182.
    Largely aided by the neurological discovery of so-called “ mirror neurons,” the attention to motor activity during action observation has exploded over the last two decades. The idea that we internally “ mirror ” the actions of others has led to a new strand of implicit simulation theories of action understanding[1][2]. The basic idea of this sort of simulation theory is that we, via an automatic covert activation of our own action representations, can understand the action and possibly the goal (...)
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  29. Modulation of Motor Cortex Activity When Observing Rewarding and Punishing Actions.Elliot Clayton Brown, Jan Roelf Wiersema, Gilles Pourtois & Martin Brüne - 2013 - Neuropsychologia 51 (1):52-58.
    Interpreting others' actions is essential for understanding the intentions and goals in social interactions. Activity in the motor cortex is evoked when we see another person performing actions, which can also be influenced by the intentions and context of the observed action. No study has directly explored the influence of reward and punishment on motor cortex activity when observing others' actions, which is likely to have substantial relevance in different social contexts. In this experiment, EEG was recorded while participants watched (...)
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  30. Algunas reflexiones acerca de la simulación mental y la perspectiva de la primera persona.Patricia Brunsteins - 2008 - Areté. Revista de Filosofía 20 (1):7-38.
    Suele considerarse a las teorías de la racionalidad, las teorías de la teoría y las teorías de la simulación mental como diversas estrategias de atribución mental, cada una de las cuales, desde una concepción tradicional, sería única y exhaustiva. En este trabajo examino algunas versiones de la teoría de la simulación mental y, particularmente, la perspectiva desde la cual estas describen la atribución mental. Finalmente, a partir de ciertas críticas, reformulo el sentido de la perspectiva de la primera persona que (...)
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  31. Analogy, Simulation, Representation.Mario Bunge - 1969 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 87 (1):16-33.
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  32. Language, Mind and Logic.Jeremy Butterfield (ed.) - 1986 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is a collection of eleven original essays in analytical philosophy by British and American philosophers, centering on the connection between mind and language. Two themes predominate: how it is that thoughts and sentences can represent the world; and what having a thought - a belief, for instance - involves. Developing from these themes are the questions: what does having a belief require of the believer, and of the way he or she relates to the environment? In particular, does having (...)
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  33. Joint Attention and Simulation.J. Campbell - 2002 - In Jerome Dokic & Joelle Proust (eds.), Simulation and Knowledge of Action. John Benjamins. pp. 241-253 (with a reply by Elisabe.
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  34. Mindreading in Infancy.Peter Carruthers - 2013 - Mind and Language 28 (2):141-172.
    Various dichotomies have been proposed to characterize the nature and development of human mindreading capacities, especially in light of recent evidence of mindreading in infants aged 7 to 18 months. This article will examine these suggestions, arguing that none is currently supported by the evidence. Rather, the data support a modular account of the domain-specific component of basic mindreading capacities. This core component is present in infants from a very young age and does not alter fundamentally thereafter. What alters with (...)
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  35. Simulation and Self-Knowledge: A Defence of the Theory-Theory.Peter Carruthers - 1996 - In Peter Carruthers & Peter K. Smith (eds.), Theories of Theories of Mind. Cambridge University Press. pp. 22--38.
    In this chapter I attempt to curb the pretensions of simulationism. I argue that it is, at best, an epistemological doctrine of limited scope. It may explain how we go about attributing beliefs and desires to others, and perhaps to ourselves, in some cases. But simulation cannot provide the fundamental basis of our conception of, or knowledge of, minded agency.
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  36. [Book Chapter].Peter Carruthers & Jill Boucher (eds.) - 1998 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  37. Theories of Theories of Mind.Peter Carruthers & Peter K. Smith (eds.) - 1996 - Cambridge University Press.
    Theories of Theories of Mind brings together contributions by a distinguished international team of philosophers, psychologists, and primatologists, who between them address such questions as: what is it to understand the thoughts, feelings, and intentions of other people? How does such an understanding develop in the normal child? Why, unusually, does it fail to develop? And is any such mentalistic understanding shared by members of other species? The volume's four parts together offer a state of the art survey of the (...)
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  38. Simuler et faire simuler.Stéphane Chauvier - 2008 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 3 (3):279-286.
    Comment simuler permet-il de connaître ? Nous distinguons la simulation subjective comme jeu de faire-semblant et la simulation objective consistant à faire simuler un comportement ou un processus par un dispositif contrôlable. Nous suggérons que la simulation compréhensive d’autrui relève de la seconde classe : nous faisons de notre propre esprit un simulateur contrôlable de celui d’autrui.How does simulation contribute to knowledge ? We shall distinguish between simulating, as a subjective game of make-believe, and simulating by using an objective device (...)
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  39. Beyond Cognition: Philosophical Issues in Autism.Emma Peng Chien - 2017 - Dissertation, University of Alberta
    This dissertation explores philosophical issues in autism and defends a new version of the enactive approach to autism and social cognition. The discussion in this dissertation centres around the question “why do autistics encounter social interaction problems?”, addressing this question in ways that raise broader philosophical issues. Within the philosophy of mind, these include the problem of other minds, the nature of emotions, and narratives and their role in understanding the self. Beyond cognition, such issues are intertwined with questions in (...)
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  40. Simulation and Knowledge of Action.William Child - 2002 - Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
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  41. Reply to Alvin I. Goldman.William Child - 2002 - In Jérôme Dokic & Joëlle Proust (eds.), Simulation and Knowledge of Action. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. pp. 45--21.
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  42. Reply to Simulation Theory and Mental Concepts.William Child - 2002 - In Jerome Dokic & Joelle Proust (eds.), Simulation and Knowledge of Action. John Benjamins.
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  43. A Humean Psychological Alternative to Kant and Wittgenstein: Comments on Stueber's Importance of Simulation for Understanding Linguistic and Rational Agency.Joe Cruz - manuscript
    Let me begin by saying that I am sympathetic to the simulation theory, especially where it is conceived of as a crucial and central addition alongside the theory-theory as the explanation of our capacity to attribute mental states, rather than as an exclusive and exhaustive account by itself.1 I part company with Professor Stueber, however, in that I view the recent simulation theory/theory- theory controversy as subject to resolution primarily through empirical findings. Still, it cannot be denied that Stueber has (...)
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  44. Simulation and the Psychology of Sociopathy.Joe Cruz - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (3):525-527.
    Mealey's (1995a) psychological explanation of the sociopath's antisocial activity appeals to an incomplete or nonstandard theory of mind. This is not the only possible mechanism of mental state attribution. The simulation theory of mental state ascription offers a better hope of explaining the diverse elements of sociopathy reported by Mealey.
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  45. Simulation Theory.Joe Cruz & Robert M. Gordon - 2003 - In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group.
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  46. Simulation-Theory, Theory-Theory, and the Evidence From Autism.Gregory Currie - 1996 - In Peter Carruthers & Peter K. Smith (eds.), Theories of Theories of Mind. Cambridge University Press. pp. 242.
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  47. Visual Imagery as the Simulation of Vision.Gregory Currie - 1995 - Mind and Language 10 (1-2):25-44.
  48. Mental Simulation and Motor Imagery.Gregory Currie & Ian Ravenscroft - 1997 - Philosophy of Science 64 (1):161-80.
    Motor imagery typically involves an experience as of moving a body part. Recent studies reveal close parallels between the constraints on motor imagery and those on actual motor performance. How are these parallels to be explained? We advance a simulative theory of motor imagery, modeled on the idea that we predict and explain the decisions of others by simulating their decision-making processes. By proposing that motor imagery is essentially off-line motor action, we explain the tendency of motor imagery to mimic (...)
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  49. The Mental Simulation Debate.Martin Davies - 1994 - Philosophical Issues 5:189-218.
    For philosophers, the current phase of the debate with which this volume is concerned can be taken to have begun in 1986, when Jane Heal and Robert Gordon published their seminal papers (Heal, 1986; Gordon, 1986; though see also, for example, Stich, 1981; Dennett, 1981). They raised a dissenting voice against what was becoming a philosophical orthodoxy: that our everyday, or folk, understanding of the mind should be thought of as theoretical. In opposition to this picture, Gordon and Heal argued (...)
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  50. Simulation Theory.Martin Davies & Tony Stone - 2000 - In Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy Online.
    Mental simulation is the simulation, replication or re-enactment, usually in imagination, of the thinking, decision-making, emotional responses, or other aspects of the mental life of another person. According to simulation theory, mental simulation in imagination plays a key role in our everyday psychological understanding of other people. The same mental resources that are used in our own thinking, decision-making or emotional responses are redeployed in imagination to provide an understanding of the thoughts, decisions or emotions of another.
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