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  1. The Paradox of Evil in Tiantai Buddhist Philosophy.JeeLoo Liu - manuscript
  2. Emptiness and Omnipresence: An Essential Introduction to Tiantai Buddhism.Brook A. Ziporyn - 2016 - Indiana University Press.
    Tiantai Buddhism emerged from an idiosyncratic and innovative interpretation of the Lotus Sutra to become one of the most complete, systematic, and influential schools of philosophical thought developed in East Asia. Brook A. Ziporyn puts Tiantai into dialogue with modern philosophical concerns to draw out its implications for ethics, epistemology, and metaphysics. Ziporyn explains Tiantai’s unlikely roots, its positions of extreme affirmation and rejection, its religious skepticism and embrace of religious myth, and its view of human consciousness. Ziporyn reveals the (...)
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  3. Theory of Personhood in Nishida Kitarō and Mou Zongsan: Reflections on Critical Buddhism's View of the Kyoto School.Tomomi Asakura - 2015 - Taiwan Journal of East Asian Studies 12 (1):41-63.
    This paper attempts to interpret the theory of personhood in the works of Nishida Kitarō (1870-1945) in a way that refutes a certain type of Nishida interpretation that Critical Buddhism offers. According to this type of interpretation, the logic of basho is a modern version of the Qixinlun system. Based on this interpretation, Critical Buddhism denounces Kyoto School philosophy as "topical Buddhism." This paper shows how Nishida himself consciously differentiates his philosophy from the idealistic and monistic system with which the (...)
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  4. Philosophy of Doctrinal Classification: Kōyama Iwao and Mou Zongsan.Tomomi Asakura - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (4):453-468.
    Doctrinal classification or the panjiao 判教 system of Chinese Buddhism has been rediscovered and renewed in modern East Asian philosophy since both the Kyoto School and New Confucianism clarified the philosophical meaning of this intellectual tradition. The theoretical relation between these two modern reconsiderations, however, has not yet been studied. I analyze the theory of panjiao in Kōyama Iwao 高山岩男 and Mou Zongsan 牟宗三 so as to identify and extract, despite their apparent irrelevance, the same type of philosophical argument concerning (...)
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  5. Philosophical Aspects of Sixth-Century Chinese Buddhist Debates on “Mind and Consciousness".Hans-Rudolf Kantor - 2014 - In Chen-Kuo Lin & Michael Radich (eds.), A Distant Mirror: Articulating Indic Ideas in Sixth and Seventh Century Chinese Buddhism. Hamburg University Press. pp. 337-395.
  6. The Unlikely Buddhologist: Tiantai Buddhism in Mou Zongsan's New Confucianism. By Jason Clower.Stefania Travagnin - 2014 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 41 (S1):761-764.
  7. Clower, Jason: The Unlikely Buddhologist, Tiantai Buddhism inMouZongsan’s New Confucianism: Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2010, 279 Pages.Sébastien Billioud - 2012 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (1):101-104.
    Clower, Jason: The Unlikely Buddhologist, Tiantai Buddhism in M ou Zongsan’s New Confucianism Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-4 DOI 10.1007/s11712-011-9261-y Authors Sébastien Billioud, Univ Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité. UFR LCAO/East Asian Studies Department, Case 7009, 16 rue Marguerite Duras, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 Paris, France Journal Dao Online ISSN 1569-7274 Print ISSN 1540-3009.
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  8. Mou Zongsan’s Ontological Reading of Tiantai Buddhism.Kwan Chun-Keung - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (2):206-222.
  9. Ambivalence of Illusion: A Chinese Buddhist Perspective.Hans-Rudolf Kantor - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (2):274-292.
  10. Truth, Deception, and Skillful Means in the Lotus Sūtra.John Schroeder - 2011 - Asian Philosophy 21 (1):35-52.
    This article seeks to broaden contemporary scholarship on the Lotus S?tra by arguing that it is a philosophically critical, self-reflective text struggling with problems of truth in Buddhist discourse. While all Lotus S?tra scholars agree that the doctrine of skillful means is a central teaching in the text, there is a common tendency to frame skillful means as a passive vehicle (or ?means?) for expressing truth rather than an active philosophical critique of truth. This article argues that the Lotus S?tra (...)
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  11. The Unlikely Buddhologist: Tiantai Buddhism in Mou Zongsan's New Confucianism.Jason Clower - 2010 - Brill.
    This highly accessible book provides a comprehensive unpacking and interpretation, suitable for students and scholars in all fields, of towering philosopher Mou ...
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  12. Mind and its "Creation" of All Phenomena in Tiantai Buddhism.Brook Ziporyn - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (2):156-180.
  13. Tiantai Buddhist Conceptions of "the Nature" (Xing) and its Relation to the Mind.Brook Ziporyn - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (3):493-512.
  14. Ziporyn, Brook, Being and Ambiguity: Philosophical Experiments with Tiantai Buddhism.Alan Dagovitz - 2009 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (3):357-360.
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  15. Fazang's Total Power Mereology: An Interpretive Analytic Reconstruction.Nicholaos Jones - 2009 - Asian Philosophy 19 (3):199-211.
    In his _Treatise on the Golden Lion_, Fazang says that wholes are _in_ each of their parts and that each part of a whole _is_ every other part of the whole. In this paper, I offer an interpretation of these remarks according to which they are not obviously false, and I use this interpretation in order to rigorously reconstruct Fazang's arguments for his claims. On the interpretation I favor, Fazang means that the presence of a whole's part suffices for the (...)
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  16. Chinese Philosophy A-Z.Bo Mou - 2009 - Edinburgh University Press.
  17. Lneradicable Frustration and Liberation in Tiantai Buddhism.Brook Ziporyn - 2009 - In G. Derfer, Z. Wang & M. Weber (eds.), The Roar of Awakening. A Whiteheadian Dialogue Between Western Psychotherapies and Eastern Worldviews. Ontos Verlag. pp. 20--117.
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  18. Shaping the Lotus Sutra: Buddhist Visual Culture in Medieval China – by Eugene Y. Wang.An-yi Pan - 2008 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (1):182–185.
  19. Ontological Indeterminacy and its Soteriological Relevance: An Assessment of Mou Zhongsan's (1909-1995) Interpretation of Zhiyi's (538-597) Tiantai Buddhism. [REVIEW]Hans-Rudolf Kantor - 2006 - Philosophy East and West 56 (1):16-68.
    : This is an attempt to clarify a vital ontological aspect of Tiantai teaching created by the sixth-century Chinese Buddhist monk Zhiyi. To do this Tiantai must first be distanced from Mou Zongsan's interpretation of its central pattern of nonduality, a reconstructive theory that refers to both Chinese Buddhism and Confucianism and sees a "two-level ontology" in Chinese philosophical traditions, grounded in both the Chinese Buddhist patterns of "nonduality between the sacred and the profane" and the Kantian distinction between "noumena (...)
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  20. The Tiantai Roots of Dōgen's Philosophy of Language and Thought.John Spackman - 2006 - Philosophy East and West 56 (3):428-450.
    : Many recent studies of Dōgen have rightly emphasized that for Dōgen language and thought are capable of expressing the buddha dharma. But they have not recognized that this positive assessment of language rests on an underlying critique of the prevalent commonsense view that language functions by representing an independent reality. Focusing on Dōgen's use of apparently paradoxical language, it is suggested that in order to understand this critique we need to trace it back to its roots in the interpretation (...)
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  21. Hitler, the Holocaust, and the Tiantai Doctrine of Evil as the Good: A Response to David R. Loy.Brook Ziporyn - 2005 - Philosophy East and West 55 (2):329-347.
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  22. Review of Evil and/or/as the Good: Omnicentrism, Intersubjectivity, and Value Paradox in Tiantai Buddhist Thought by Brook Ziporyn. [REVIEW]David R. Loy - 2004 - Philosophy East and West 54 (1):99-103.
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  23. A Tentative Discussion On The Relationship Between Zen And Tiantai Section.Qi-hai Zeng - 2003 - Philosophy and Culture 30 (6):97-108.
    Zen and the roof were very unique Chinese Buddhist sect, which occur in the course of history with all kinds of relationships. Instrument such as the origins of Zen meditation all Guifeng Zongmi of "meditation device" is a Zhiyi "small Zhiguan" of transcription; Zen four Zudao Xin's "five heart to be" is also Zhiyi "card on the heart "The inherited; Zen lived north were Shenxiu Jingzhou Yuquan, Zhiyi Zhiguan seriously affected, and author of the same name with Zhiyi" view of (...)
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  24. Li (Principle, Coherence) in Chinese Buddhism.Brook Ziporyn - 2003 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 30 (3‐4):501-524.
  25. Preface: The Lotus Sutra and Chinese Philosophy.Chung-Ying Cheng - 2001 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 28 (4):353–353.
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  26. Preface: The Lotus Sutra and Chinese Philosophy.Chung-Ying Cheng - 2001 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 28 (4):353-353.
  27. “Unity of Three Truths” and Three Forms of Creativity: Lotus Sutra and Process Philosophy.Chung-Ying Cheng - 2001 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 28 (4):449–456.
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  28. The Lotus Sutra and Process Philosophy.Philip E. Devenish - 2001 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 21 (1):119-122.
  29. The Lotus Sutra and Whitehead’s Last Writings.Joseph Grange - 2001 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 28 (4):385–398.
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  30. Inherent Entailment And Negative Prehensions: Givenness, The Agency of the Past, and the Pr.Brook Ziporyn - 2001 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 28 (4):399-414.
  31. Setup, Punch Line, and the Mind-Body Problem: A Neo-Tiantai Approach.Brook Ziporyn - 2000 - Philosophy East and West 50 (4):584-613.
    Ideas adapted from the tradition of Chinese Tiantai Buddhism, in particular the notions of the "Three Truths" and "opening the provisional to reveal the real," are applied to the traditional mind-body problem as framed in Western philosophical discourse. An attempt is made to offer an account of the mind-body relation that explicates both the identity and the opposition between these two terms, thereby avoiding the traditional positions of dualism, monism, and parallelism while also accounting for the features of the relation (...)
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  32. What's so Good About Evil: Value and Anti-Value in Tiantai Thought and its Antecedents.Brook Anthony Ziporyn - 1996 - Dissertation, University of Michigan
    This dissertation may be viewed as an exposition of the philosophical implications of a single eight-character sentence from the works of the Tiantai Buddhist monk Siming Zhili , the literal meaning of which may be rendered: "Other than the devil there is no Buddha, other than the Buddha there is no devil." A context in which to effectively interpret the significance of this claim is provided by examining the Chinese philosophical tradition with an eye for three closely related themes: notions (...)
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  33. Foundations of T'ien-T'ai Philosophy: The Flowering of the Two Truths Theory in Chinese Buddhism.Paul L. Swanson - 1992 - Philosophy East and West 42 (2):344-347.
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  34. Why the Lotus Sutra? On the Historic Significance of Tendai.Whalen Lai - 1987 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 14 (2-3):83-99.
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  35. The Two Truths Controversy in China and Chih-I's Threefold Truth Concept.Paul Loren Swanson - 1985 - Dissertation, The University of Wisconsin - Madison
    The meaning of the two truths--the worldly or mundane truth samvrtisatya , and the real or supreme truth -- was a hotly debated topic among Chinese Buddhists in the 5th and 6th century a.d. From the time of Kumarajiva this issue was discussed in terms of yu and wu . Usually yu was iden- tified with samvrtisatya and wu with paramarthasatya, leading to the mistaken conclusion that the two truths represent two separate realities. The ambiguous meaning of these terms also (...)
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  36. Tian-Tai Metaphysics Vs. Hua-Yan Metaphysics.JeeLoo Liu - unknown
    Tian-tai Buddhism and Hua-yan Buddhism can be viewed as the two most philosophically important schools in Chinese Buddhism. The Tian-tai school was founded by Zhi-yi (Chih-i) (538-597 A.D.). The major Buddhist text endorsed by this school is the Lotus Sutra, short for “the Sutra of the Lotus Blossom of the Subtle Dharma.” Hua-yan Buddhism derived its name from the Hua-yan Sutra, translated as “The Flower Ornament Scripture” or as “The Flowery Splendor Scripture.”1 The founder of the Hua-yan school was a (...)
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  37. The Three Truths in Tiantai Buddhism.B. Ziporyn - unknown
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