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  1. added 2020-06-05
    Between Philosophy and Art: A Collaboration at The Lock-Up, Newcastle.Jennifer A. McMahon, Elizabeth Burns Coleman, David Macarthur, James Phillips & Daniel von Sturmer - 2016 - Australasian Journal of Popular Culture 5 (2/3):135-150.
    At The Lock-Up in Newcastle one weekend in September 2015, a group of artists, musicians and performers, performed to an audience which included philosopher commentators. The idea was to look for points of intersection, interface or divergence between art and philosophy. However, what we found was that the commentators were not engaged in analysing what was simply given them, but instead actively constructing the meaning they would ascribe to the work. As such they were co-creators. The objective of this report (...)
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  2. added 2020-04-29
    Beauty, Art and the Western Tradition.Derek Allan - 2020 - In Rohan Curnow, Robert Andrews & Matthew Del Nevo (eds.), Beauty and the Christian Tradition. Sydney: St Paul's Publications. pp. 1-21.
    Examines the birth of art-as-beauty in Western art and the concomitant birth of the idea of art itself. Also discusses the death of art-as-beauty from Manet onward and certain implications for aesthetics (the philosophy of art). Includes relevant reproductions. (The essay is a longer version of my paper "The Birth and Death of Beauty in Western Art" also listed on PhilPapers.).
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  3. added 2020-04-20
    To Thine Own Selves Be True-Ish: Shakespeare’s Hamlet as Formal Model.Joshua Landy - 2018 - In Tzachi Zamir (ed.), Shakespeare’s Hamlet: Philosophical Perspectives. New York, NY, USA: pp. 154-87.
    This chapter presents the core challenge before Hamlet as that of achieving authenticity in the face of inner multiplicity. Authenticity—which this chapter will take to mean (1) acting on the (2) knowledge of (3) what one truly is, beneath one’s various masks and social roles—becomes a particularly pressing need under conditions of (early) modernity, when traditional forms of action-guidance are at least halfway off the table. But authenticity is highly problematic when the self that is discovered turns out to be (...)
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  4. added 2020-04-20
    Formative Fictions: Imaginative Literature and the Training of the Capacities.Joshua Landy - 2012 - Poetics Today 2 (33):167-214.
    While it is often assumed that fictions must be informative or morally improving in order to be of any real benefit to us, certain texts defy this assumption by functioning as training grounds for the capacities: in engaging with them, we stand to become not more knowledgeable or more virtuous but more skilled, whether at rational thinking, at maintaining necessary illusions, at achieving tranquility of mind, or even at religious faith. Instead of offering us propositional knowledge, these texts yield know-how; (...)
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  5. added 2020-04-20
    The Varieties of Modern Enchantment.Joshua Landy - 2009 - In Joshua Landy & Michael Saler (eds.), The Re-Enchantment of the World: Secular Magic in a Rational Age. Stanford, CA, USA: pp. 1-14.
    This chapter argues that there is a variety of secular and conscious strategies for re-enchantment, held together by a common aim of filling a God-shaped void. The discussion also introduces three approaches to affirm the claim and offer a more nuanced understanding of the nature of modernity. The first is to reject the notion that any lingering enchantment within Western culture must of necessity be a relic (the binary approach). The second is to reject the notion that modernity is itself (...)
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  6. added 2020-04-20
    The Re-Enchantment of the World: Secular Magic in a Rational Age.Joshua Landy & Michael Saler (eds.) - 2009 - Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.
    The Re-Enchantment of the World is an interdisciplinary volume that challenges the long-prevailing view of modernity as "disenchanted." There is of course something to the widespread idea, so memorably put into words by Max Weber, that modernity is characterized by the "progressive disenchantment of the world." Yet what is less often recognized is the fact that a powerful counter-tendency runs alongside this one, an overwhelming urge to fill the vacuum left by departed convictions, and to do so without invoking superseded (...)
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  7. added 2020-04-20
    Philosophy to the Rescue. [REVIEW]Joshua Landy - 2007 - Philosophy and Literature 31 (2):405-419.
    Review of Mark William Roche, Why Literature Matters in the Twenty-First Century, and Frank B. Farrell, Why Does Literature Matter?
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  8. added 2020-04-18
    How to Do Things with Fictions.Joshua Landy - 2012 - New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press.
    How to Do Things with Fictions considers how fictional works, ranging from Chaucer to Beckett, subject readers to a series of exercises meant to fortify their mental capacities. While it is often assumed that fictions must be informative or morally improving in order to be of any real benefit to us, certain texts defy this assumption by functioning as training-grounds for the capacities: in engaging with them we stand not to become more knowledgeable or more virtuous but more skilled, whether (...)
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  9. added 2020-04-08
    Has André Malraux’s Imaginary Museum Come Into its Own?Derek Allan - 2020 - Apollo, an International Art Magazine.
    A brief discussion of André Malraux's concept of the musée imaginaire (Imaginary Museum or Museum without Walls) and a comment on the neglect of Malraux's theory of art. (Link provided).
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  10. added 2020-02-12
    Defining Art, Creating the Canon: Artistic Value in an Era of Doubt.Michelle Lavigne - 2008 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (3):317-319.
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  11. added 2020-02-07
    What Do We See in Museums?Graham Oddie - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 79:217-240.
    I address two related questions. First: what value is there in visiting a museum and becoming acquainted with the objects on display? For art museums the answer seems obvious: we go to experience valuable works of art, and experiencing valuable works of art is itself valuable. In this paper I focus on non-art museums, and while these may house aesthetically valuable objects, that is not their primary purpose, and at least some of the objects they house might not be particularly (...)
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  12. added 2020-02-03
    Transformative Expression.Nick Riggle - forthcoming - In Enoch Lambert & John Schwenkler (eds.), Becoming Someone New: Essays on Transformative Experience, Choice, and Change. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    The hope that art could be personally or socially transformational is an important part of art history and contemporary art practice. In the twentieth century, it shaped a movement away from traditional media in an effort to make social life a medium. Artists imagined and created participatory situations designed to facilitate potentially transformative expression in those who engaged with the works. This chapter develops the concept of “transformative expression,” and illustrates how it informs a diverse range of such works. Understanding (...)
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  13. added 2019-12-19
    Aesthetic Hedonism and Its Critics.Servaas Van der Berg - 2020 - Philosophy Compass 15 (1):e12645.
    This essay surveys the main objections to aesthetic hedonism, the view that aesthetic value is reducible to the value of aesthetic pleasure or experience. Hedonism is the dominant view of aesthetic value, but a spate of recent criticisms has drawn its accuracy into question. I introduce some distinctions crucial to the criticisms, before using the bulk of the essay to identify and review six major lines of argument that hedonism's critics have employed against it. Whether or not these arguments suffice (...)
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  14. added 2019-11-28
    Functional Beauty, Pleasure, and Experience.Panos Paris - forthcoming - Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-15.
    I offer a set of sufficient conditions for beauty, drawing on Parsons and Carlson’s account of ‘functional beauty’. First, I argue that their account is flawed, whilst falling short of...
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  15. added 2019-11-08
    The (Moral) Problem of Reading Confessions.Gene Fendt - 1998 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 72:171-184.
    In Augustine's Confessions we can find two arguments against drama. One of them is entirely Platonic, echoing the problems raised in Republic 2 and 3 that representations of evil encourage moral turpitude. The other, which can be found in Republic 10, is much more visible in Confessions, and Augustine is more perspicuous than Plato in laying out the difficulty; it has to do with the immoral effect of suffering grief at staged sufferings, where we are moved neither to escape the (...)
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  16. added 2019-11-01
    Does Artistic Value Pose a Special Problem for Time Travel Theories?James W. McAllister - 2020 - British Journal of Aesthetics 60 (1):61-69.
    Michael Dummett and Storrs McCall have claimed that time travel scenarios in which an artist copies an artwork from a reproduction of it that has been sent from the future introduce a causal loop of a new kind: one involving artistic value. They have suggested that this poses a hitherto unacknowledged challenge to time travel theories. I argue that their conclusion depends on some unstated essentialist assumptions about metaphysics of art and the status of representations. By relaxing these assumptions, I (...)
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  17. added 2019-10-20
    Review of The Lost Carving: A Journey Into the Heart of Making, by David Esterly (Viking: New York, 2012). [REVIEW]Stefanie Rocknak - 2013 - Popular Woodworking Magazine 1.
    In 1986, David Esterly won a competition to carve a replacement of a Grinling Gibbons “wall drop” for Hampten Court Palace, in East Molesey, England. His task was an onerous one: Gibbons invented a style of carving that has been matched by few, and surpassed by still fewer. Esterly is one of the latter few; his technique is superb. -/- The Lost Carving gives us an account of those fateful days at Hampton Court. Interwoven with memories of recreating the Gibbon’s (...)
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  18. added 2019-10-20
    On the Resistance of the Instrument.Tom Cochrane - 2013 - In Tom Cochrane, Klaus Scherer & Bernardino Fantini (eds.), The Emotional Power of Music: Multidisciplinary perspectives on musical arousal, expression, and social control. Oxford: pp. 75-83.
    I examine the role that the musical instrument plays in shaping a performer's expressive activity and emotional state. I argue that the historical development of the musical instrument has fluctuated between two key values: that of sharing with other musicians, and that of creatively exploring new possibilities. I introduce 'the mood organ'- a sensor-based computer instrument that automatically turns signals of the wearer's emotional state into expressive music.
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  19. added 2019-10-17
    Hope Coming On: Reflecting Nihilism.Michael R. Spicher - 2019 - Journal of Comparative Literature and Aesthetics 42 (2).
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  20. added 2019-10-07
    Art for Goodness Sake.Miguel Benitez - 2019 - The Chesterton Review 45 (1):123-127.
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  21. added 2019-09-30
    Things: In Touch with the Past. [REVIEW]Filippo Contesi - 2019 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 201909.
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  22. added 2019-09-07
    Kitsch: The World of Bad Taste.Gillo Dorfles & John McHale (eds.) - 1969 - New York: Bell Publishing.
    Gillo Dorfles offers a veritable "catalogue raisonne of reigning bad taste" in the visual arts. His purpose is not simply to entertain but rather to demonstrate the contagious and corrosive nature of a phenomenon that threatens to debilitate the creative energies of the very society that spawned it. He and the other contributors examine the use of kitsch in politics, religion, advertising, film, architecture and design, "pornokitsch," and the modern trappings that surround birth, family life and death. To document the (...)
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  23. added 2019-09-02
    Contemporary Kitsch: The Death of Pseudo-Art and the Birth of Everyday Cheesiness (A Postcolonial Inquiry).Max Ryynänen - 2018 - Terra Aestheticae: Journal of Russian Society for Aesthetics 1 (1):70-86.
    The discourse on kitsch has changed tone. The concept, which in the early 20th century referred more to pretentious pseudo-art than to cute everyday objects, was attacked between the World Wars by theorists of modernity (e.g. Greenberg on Repin). The late 20th century scholars gazed at it with critical curiosity (Eco, Kulka, Calinescu). What we now have is a profound interest in and acceptance of cute mass-produced objects. It has become marginal to use the concept to criticize pseudo-art. Scholars who (...)
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  24. added 2019-09-02
    Nobrow.Max Ryynänen - 2005 - Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 17 (32).
    Less than an attempt to philosophically define anything, the following text should be read as a theoretical sketch to portray an artistic margin, which has not yet been much discussed, although it has been loosely touched upon as a side product of many other theoretical aspirations. Its name, ‘nobrow’, is borrowed from a use somewhat different from mine, but is accurate in pointing out that there is a dynamic position works of art can acquire when they use both high and (...)
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  25. added 2019-08-14
    Art and Selfhood: A Kierkegaardian Account.Antony Aumann - 2019 - Lanham, MD 20706, USA: Lexington Books.
    Drawing on insights from Søren Kierkegaard, Art and Selfhood: A Kierkegaardian Account defends the idea that art matters in our society today because it can play a pivotal role in helping us become better and more authentic versions of ourselves.
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  26. added 2019-07-30
    Autonomy and Aesthetic Engagement.C. Thi Nguyen - forthcoming - Mind:fzz054.
    There seems to be a deep tension between two aspects of aesthetic appreciation. On the one hand, we care about getting things right. On the other hand, we demand autonomy. We want appreciators to arrive at their aesthetic judgments through their own cognitive efforts, rather than deferring to experts. These two demands seem to be in tension; after all, if we want to get the right judgments, we should defer to the judgments of experts. The best explanation, I suggest, is (...)
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  27. added 2019-07-28
    Aesthetic Contextualism.Jerrold Levinson - 2007 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 4 (3):1-12.
    Let me begin with a quote: “The universal organum of philosophy—the ground stone of its entire architecture—is the philosophy of art.”1 This statement, made in 1800 by the German Idealist philosopher Friedrich Schelling, is rather striking, not only because of its grandiosity, but also because it contrasts with what the majority of contemporary philosophers would be prepared to say on the subject. There is nevertheless a grain of truth in the claim that there is a peculiar connection between art and (...)
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  28. added 2019-06-13
    Про музеологічну освіту та деякі особливості викладання музеологічних дисциплін.Oksana Bondarets - 2018 - NaUKMA Research Papers. History and Theory of Culture 1:69-75.
    У рамках підвищення кваліфікації (стажування) автор ознайомилась зі специфікою викладання музеологічних дисциплін у низці закладів вищої освіти України та наголошує як на важливості музеологічної освіти для наукових працівників музею, так і на необхідності удосконалення змісту, форм і методів цієї освіти. Розробка методики викладання музеологічних дисциплін є на сьогодні вкрай необхідною.
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  29. added 2019-06-08
    The Birth and Death of Beauty in Western Art.Derek Allan - manuscript
    Examines (1) the birth of art-as-beauty in Western art and the concomitant birth of the idea of art itself; (2) the death of art-of-beauty from Manet onwards. Also looks briefly at some major implications for aesthetics (the philosophy of art). Paper includes some relevant reproductions.
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  30. added 2019-06-06
    For the Love of Art: Artistic Values and Appreciative Virtue: Matthew Kieran.Matthew Kieran - 2012 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 71:13-31.
    It is argued that instrumentalizing the value of art does an injustice to artistic appreciation and provides a hostage to fortune. Whilst aestheticism offers an intellectual bulwark against such an approach, it focuses on what is distinctive of art at the expense of broader artistic values. It is argued that artistic appreciation and creativity involve not just skills but excellences of character. The nature of particular artistic or appreciative virtues and vices are briefly explored, such as snobbery, aestheticism and creativity, (...)
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  31. added 2019-06-06
    Critical Philosophy as Artistic Endeavor: On the Form of Kant’s “Critique of Aesthetic Judgment” and its Implications.Samuel A. Stoner - 2010 - Southwest Philosophy Review 26 (1):181-187.
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  32. added 2019-06-06
    Defining Art, Creating the Canon: Artistic Value in an Era of Doubt: Book Reviews. [REVIEW]David Davies - 2008 - British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (4):457-459.
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  33. added 2019-06-06
    Altering Artworks: Creators’ Moral Rights Vs. The Public Good.Lawrence Lengbeyer - 2005 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 12 (2):53-61.
    The grounds for recognizing that artists possess a personal “moral right of integrity” that would entitle them to prevent others from modifying their works are weak. There is, however, an important public interest in protecting highly-valued entities, including at least some works of art, from permanently destructive transformations.
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  34. added 2019-06-05
    Artistic Merit. Budd - 2014 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 48 (1):10.
    If you are interested in art, you engage in artistic evaluation, thinking of one work as being better than another; one artist as being better than another; some works and some artists as being great, mediocre, or poor; and, perhaps, thinking of some forms or genres of art as being superior to others in that works within the favored form or genre have achieved or can aspire to a higher artistic value than is possible for those less favored. The greatest (...)
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  35. added 2019-06-03
    How Art Teaches: A Lesson From Goodman.Markus Lammenranta - 2019 - Paths From the Philosophy of Art to Everyday Aesthetics.
    In “How Art Teaches: A Lesson from Goodman”, Markus Lammenranta inquires if and how artworks can convey propositional knowledge about the world. Lammenranta argues that the cognitive role of art can be explained by revising Nelson Goodman’s theory of symbols. According to Lammenranta, the problem of Goodman’s theory is that, despite providing an account of art’s symbolic function, it denies art the possibility of mediating propositional knowledge. Lammenranta claims that Goodman’s theory can be augmented by enlarging it with an account (...)
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  36. added 2019-05-23
    A First-Person Theory of Documentation.Tim Gorichanaz - 2019 - Journal of Documentation 75 (1):190-212.
    Purpose To first articulate and then illustrate a descriptive theoretical model of documentation (i.e., document creation) suitable for analysis of the experiential, first-person perspective. Design/methodology/approach Three models of documentation in the literature are presented and synthesized into a new model. This model is then used to understand the findings from a phenomenology-of-practice study of the work of seven visual artists as they each created a self-portrait, understood here as a form of documentation. Findings A number of themes are found to (...)
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  37. added 2019-05-02
    The Fear of Aesthetics in Art and Literary Theory.Sam Rose - 2017 - New Literary History 48 (2):223-244.
    Is aesthetics, as has recently been claimed, now able to meet the accusations often levelled against it? This essay examines counters to three of the most common: that aesthetics is based around overly narrow conceptions of "art" and "the aesthetic"; that aesthetics is politically disengaged; and that aesthetics fails to engage with actual art objects and their histories.
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  38. added 2019-04-23
    The Biology of Art.Richard A. Richards - 2019 - Cambridge University Press.
    Biological accounts of art typically start with evolutionary, psychological or neurobiological theories. These approaches might be able to explain many of the similarities we see in art behaviors within and across human populations, but they don't obviously explain the differences we also see. Nor do they give us guidance on how we should engage with art, or the conceptual basis for art. A more comprehensive framework, based also on the ecology of art and how art behaviors get expressed in engineered (...)
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  39. added 2019-04-04
    Musical Profundity: Wittgenstein's Paradigm Shift.Eran Guter - 2019 - Apeiron. Estudios de Filosofia 10:41-58.
    The current debate concerning musical profundity was instigated, and set up by Peter Kivy in his book Music Alone (1990) as part of his comprehensive defense of enhanced formalism, a position he championed vigorously throughout his entire career. Kivy’s view of music led him to maintain utter skepticism regarding musical profundity. The scholarly debate that ensued centers on the question whether or not (at least some) music can be profound. In this study I would like to take the opportunity to (...)
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  40. added 2019-04-02
    The Ancient Quarrel Between Art and Philosophy in Contemporary Exhibitions of Visual Art.Jennifer A. McMahon - 2019 - Curator: The Museum Journal 62 (1):7-17.
    At a time when professional art criticism is on the wane, the ancient quarrel between art and philosophy demands fresh answers. Professional art criticism provided a basis upon which to distinguish apt experiences of art from the idiosyncratic. However, currently the kind of narratives from which critics once drew are underplayed or discarded in contemporary exhibition design where the visual arts are concerned. This leaves open the possibility that art operates either as mere stimulant to private reverie or, in the (...)
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  41. added 2019-03-29
    The Aesthetic Function of Art. [REVIEW]Dominic McIver Lopes - 2007 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (2):484-487.
  42. added 2019-03-25
    Pictures: Their Power in Practice.Dominic McIver Lopes - 2018 - In Jérôme Pelletier & Alberto Voltolini (eds.), The Pleasure of Pictures: Pictorial Experience and Aesthetic Appreciation. London: Routledge. pp. 36-51.
    What are pictures good for? “Nothing” recurs as the apparently irrepress- ible reply of a motley collection iconophobes from Plato to the mediaeval iconoclasts, to parents concerned about comic books, to postmoderns in a lather over “scopic regimes”. In the aftermath of Nelson Goodman’s Languages of Art (1976), philosophers doubled down on theories of depiction and pictorial experience, but they have not rushed to work on the value of pictures. Those few who have written about pictorial value have taken for (...)
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  43. added 2019-03-04
    Faits et valeurs en esthétique: approches et enjeux actuels.Filippo Fimiani, Jacinto Lageira, Barbara Formis & Evangelos Athanassopoulos - 2016 - Nouvelle Revue d'Esthétique 2 (18):5-9.
    Inspired by the text entitled The Collapse of the Fact/Value Dichotomy and Other Essays (2004) of Hilary Putnam, the volume focuses on the theory and practice of knowledge, but one can legitimately extend it to other fields, most especially in aesthetics. Certain observable features in the fields of aesthetics, practice and artistic creation show that old evaluation criteria may now be obsolete. This is because upon further consideration, the definition of value remains opaque : should the artwork be judged according (...)
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  44. added 2019-02-12
    Nietzsche and Schiller on Aesthetic Semblance.Timothy Stoll - 2019 - The Monist 102 (3):331-348.
    Nietzsche consistently valorizes artistic falsehoods. On standard interpretations, this is because art provides deceptive yet salutary fictions that help us affirm life. This reading conflicts, however, with Nietzsche’s insistence that life-affirmation requires untrammeled honesty. I present an alternative interpretation which navigates the interpretive impasse. With special attention to the influence of Friedrich Schiller, the paper argues for three claims: (1) Nietzsche does not hold that art is false because it “beautifies,” but because it produces mere semblances of, its objects; (2) (...)
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  45. added 2019-02-02
    Philosophy for Girls: Book Proposal.Melissa Shew & Kim Garchar - forthcoming
    This forthcoming edited volume is written by expert women in philosophy for younger women and girls ages 16-20. It features a range of ethical, metaphysical, social and political, and other philosophical chapters divided into four main sections. Each chapter features an opening anecdote involving women and/or girls from historical, literary, artistic, scientific, mythic, and other sources to lead into the main topic of the chapter.
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  46. added 2019-01-25
    Assessing the Intellectual Value of New Genre Public Art.Elisa Caldarola - 2019 - Open Philosophy 2 (1):22-29.
    Suzanne Lacy introduced the term ‘New Genre Public Art’ (NGPA) to refer to art practices that depart from those traditional of public art (such as installing works in parks and plazas) and focus instead on the direct engagement of artists with audiences to deal with pressing socio-political issues. In this paper, I argue that some works of NGPA should be valued for the intellectual value grounded in their artistic features, not dissimilarly to works of conceptual art. In developing my argument, (...)
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  47. added 2018-12-04
    Cézanne - Van Gogh - Monet. Genese der Abstraktion, second editon of PhD thesis from 1999/2000.Martina Sauer - 2014 - Heidelberg: ART-Dok.
    Do abstract paintings still make sense and if so what do they mean? By reducing the paintings to simple square blots as by Cézanne, to lines as by van Gogh and color traces as by Monet their meaning is fundamentally questioned. But by interpreting these compositions as effective forces or rather affective stimuli a new and different meaning becomes apparent. Landscapes are no longer introduced but made real in the aesthetic experience. Therefore aesthetics or rather aisthetics (perception) can be defined (...)
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  48. added 2018-12-02
    Lo concreto y lo complejo en el valor del arte.José Ramón Fabelo Corzo - 2017 - Revista Cubana de Ciencias Sociales 47 (47):99-111.
    El trabajo argumenta la necesidad de interpretar el valor del arte, por un lado, de manera concreta, como síntesis de múltiples determinaciones y tomando en consideración las condiciones de la época y lugar en las que la obra artística se inserta; y por otro lado, como producto complejo poseedor de múltiples dimensiones, diferentes pero interconectadas entre sí.
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  49. added 2018-11-28
    The Problem of Non-Perceptual Art.James Shelley - 2003 - British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (4):363-378.
    Consider the following three propositions: (R) Artworks necessarily have aesthetic properties that are relevant to their appreciation as artworks. (S) Aesthetic properties necessarily depend, at least in part, on properties perceived by means of the five senses. (X) There exist artworks that need not be perceived by means of the five senses to be appreciated as artworks. The independent plausibility and apparent joint inconsistency of these three propositions give rise to what I refer to as ‘the problem of non-perceptual art’. (...)
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  50. added 2018-11-28
    The Nature of Art. [REVIEW]James Shelley - 2003 - American Society for Aesthetics Newsletter 23.
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