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  1. added 2018-12-04
    Cézanne - Van Gogh - Monet. Genese der Abstraktion, second editon of PhD thesis from 1999/2000.Martina Sauer - 2014 - Heidelberg: ART-Dok.
    Do abstract paintings still make sense and if so what do they mean? By reducing the paintings to simple square blots as by Cézanne, to lines as by van Gogh and color traces as by Monet their meaning is fundamentally questioned. But by interpreting these compositions as effective forces or rather affective stimuli a new and different meaning becomes apparent. Landscapes are no longer introduced but made real in the aesthetic experience. Therefore aesthetics or rather aisthetics (perception) can be defined (...)
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  2. added 2018-12-02
    Lo concreto y lo complejo en el valor del arte.José Ramón Fabelo Corzo - 2017 - Revista Cubana de Ciencias Sociales 47 (47):99-111.
    El trabajo argumenta la necesidad de interpretar el valor del arte, por un lado, de manera concreta, como síntesis de múltiples determinaciones y tomando en consideración las condiciones de la época y lugar en las que la obra artística se inserta; y por otro lado, como producto complejo poseedor de múltiples dimensiones, diferentes pero interconectadas entre sí.
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  3. added 2018-11-28
    The Nature of Art. [REVIEW]James Shelley - 2003 - American Society for Aesthetics Newsletter 23.
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  4. added 2018-11-28
    The Problem of Non-Perceptual Art.James Shelley - 2003 - British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (4):363-378.
    Consider the following three propositions: (R) Artworks necessarily have aesthetic properties that are relevant to their appreciation as artworks. (S) Aesthetic properties necessarily depend, at least in part, on properties perceived by means of the five senses. (X) There exist artworks that need not be perceived by means of the five senses to be appreciated as artworks. The independent plausibility and apparent joint inconsistency of these three propositions give rise to what I refer to as ‘the problem of non-perceptual art’. (...)
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  5. added 2018-11-28
    Philosophies of Arts: An Essay in Differences. [REVIEW]James Shelley - 1999 - Philosophy in Review 18.
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  6. added 2018-11-28
    Aesthetics: The Big Questions. [REVIEW]James Shelley - 1999 - American Society for Aesthetics Newsletter 19.
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  7. added 2018-11-26
    Por una estética apegada a la vida.José Ramón Fabelo Corzo - 2010 - Revista de Filosofía (Venezuela) 66 (3):89-100.
    Los actuales procesos de estetización del mundo de la vida y de transformación de objetos cotidianos en obras de arte tienden a ser interpretados teóricamente como una difuminación de las fronteras entre arte y vida. Cualquier cosa puede ser arte -afirma Arthur C. Danto, uno de los más reconocidos filósofos del arte de la actualidad-, pero ¿lo puede ser en realidad? Este ensayo se cuestiona esa afirmación basado en los límites axiológicos de la misma.
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  8. added 2018-11-20
    Arte Conceptual.Elisa Caldarola - 2018 - Enciclopedia de la Sociedad Española de Filosofía Analítica.
    La categoría ‘arte conceptual’ se aplica a una gran cantidad de obras de arte contemporáneo. El artista Sol LeWitt introdujo el término en la jerga del arte al describir obras de arte donde “la idea o el concepto es el aspecto más importante de la obra” (LeWitt 1967: 79, traducción mía). Inicialmente, el término se utilizó para referirse a obras producidas entre finales de los años sesenta y principios de los setenta por artistas como Sol LeWitt, Robert Barry, Lawrence Weiner, (...)
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  9. added 2018-11-09
    Can Machines Create Art?Mark Coeckelbergh - 2016 - Philosophy and Technology 30 (3):285-303.
    As machines take over more tasks previously done by humans, artistic creation is also considered as a candidate to be automated. But, can machines create art? This paper offers a conceptual framework for a philosophical discussion of this question regarding the status of machine art and machine creativity. It breaks the main question down in three sub-questions, and then analyses each question in order to arrive at more precise problems with regard to machine art and machine creativity: What is art (...)
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  10. added 2018-10-28
    Introduzione.Elisa Caldarola, Quattrocchi Davide & Gabriele Tomasi - 2013 - In Elisa Caldarola, Davide Quattrocchi & Gabriele Tomasi (eds.), Wittgenstein, l’estetica e le arti. Roma - Bari: Carocci.
  11. added 2018-10-18
    An Autonomist View on the Ethical Criticism of Architecture.Ricardo Miguel - 2016 - Philosophy@Lisbon (5):131-141.
    It is a fact that there is ethical criticism about art. Art critics, the general public and even artists point out moral flaws in artworks while evaluating them. Philosophers, however, have maintained a hot debate on the meaning of such criticism. This debate can be understood as a disagreement about the kind of relation between the artistic value of artworks and their alleged moral value. While some claim that moral value can contribute to artistic value (moralism), others claim that there (...)
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  12. added 2018-09-05
    Erotic Art.Hans Maes - 2014 - Stanford Encyclopaedia of Philosophy.
    What is erotic art? Do all paintings with a sexual theme qualify as erotic? How to distinguish between erotica and erotic art? In what way are aesthetic experiences related to, or different from, erotic experiences and are they at all compatible? Both people and works of art can be sensually appealing, but is the beauty in each case substantially the same? How helpful is the distinction between the nude and the naked? Can we draw a strict line between erotic art (...)
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  13. added 2018-08-06
    The Nature of the Interaction Between Moral and Artistic Value.Moonyoung Song - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (3):285-295.
    This article aims to advance our understanding of the interaction between moral and artistic value by asking what it means that an artwork's moral virtue or defect is an artistic virtue or defect and how we can prove or disprove such a claim. I approach these questions first by distinguishing between intrinsic and contextual value interactions and then by examining two strategies commonly used to establish claims about contextual value interaction: (1) appealing to the counterfactual dependence of the work's artistic (...)
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  14. added 2018-07-24
    Denis Dutton, The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, and Human Evolution. [REVIEW]Tomas Hribek - 2011 - Estetika 48 (2):248-253.
    A review of Denis Dutton´s The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, and Human Evolution (New York: Bloomsbury Press, 2009, 280 pp. ISBN 978-1-59691-401-8).
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  15. added 2018-06-30
    Beauty, Art and the Western Tradition.Derek Allan - manuscript
    From the Renaissance onwards, the Western tradition singled out the term beauty for a unique and highly prestigious role. As Christian belief began its gradual decline, Renaissance art invented a rival transcendence in the form of an exalted world of nobility, harmony and beauty – the world exemplified by the works of painters such as Raphael, Titian and Poussin. Beauty in this sense quickly became the ruling ideal of Western art, subsequently underpinning the explanations of the nature and function of (...)
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  16. added 2018-06-07
    The Aesthetics of Theory Selection and the Logics of Art.Ian O'Loughlin & Katie McCallum - 2018 - Philosophy of Science.
    Philosophers of science discuss whether theory selection depends on aesthetic judgments or criteria, and whether these putatively aesthetic features are genuinely extra-epistemic. As examples, judgments involving criteria such as simplicity and symmetry are often cited. However, other theory selection criteria, such as fecundity, coherence, internal consistency, and fertility, more closely match those criteria used in art contexts and by scholars working in aesthetics. Paying closer attention to the way these criteria are used in art contexts allows us to understand some (...)
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  17. added 2018-06-02
    Heidegger's Conception of World and the Possibility of Great Art.Justin F. White - 2018 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 56 (1):127-155.
    Influential interpretations of Heidegger’s Origin of the Work of Art focus on the view that great art is massive and communal—typically structures like temples and cathedrals. This approach, however, faces two interpretive problems. First, what are we to do with artworks in the essay that clearly are not monumental or communal, such as van Gogh’s Shoes? Second, how should we understand our experience of works such as the Greek temple, which once were but are no longer central in this way? (...)
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  18. added 2018-05-17
    Art: What It Is and Why It Matters.Catharine Abell - 2012 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 85 (3):671-691.
    In this paper, I provide a descriptive definition of art that is able to accommodate the existence of bad art, while illuminating the value of good art. This, I argue, is something that existing definitions of art fail to do. I approach this task by providing an account according to which what makes something an artwork is the institutional process by which it is made. I argue that Searle’s account of institutions and institutional facts shows that the existence of all (...)
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  19. added 2018-05-17
    The Epistemic Value of Photographs.Catharine Abell - 2010 - In Catharine Abell & Katerina Bantinaki (eds.), Philosophical Perspectives on Depiction. Oxford University Press.
    There is a variety of epistemic roles to which photographs are better suited than non-photographic pictures. Photographs provide more compelling evidence of the existence of the scenes they depict than non-photographic pictures. They are also better sources of information about features of those scenes that are easily overlooked. This chapter examines several different attempts to explain the distinctive epistemic value of photographs, and argues that none is adequate. It then proposes an alternative explanation of their epistemic value. The chapter argues (...)
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  20. added 2018-03-29
    Pictures and Beauty.Robert Hopkins - 1997 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 97 (2):177–194.
    What reasons are there to value pictures? I consider one: that pictures enable us to judge, and more than that to savour, the beauty (if any) of the objects they depict. I clarify and defend this claim, tentatively explore what might explain it, consider how far it might generalize beyond beauty to other features of aesthetic interest, and assess its importance for the aesthetics of pictures.
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  21. added 2018-03-28
    Imaginative Understanding, Affective Profiles, and the Expression of Emotion in Art.Robert Hopkins - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (4):363-374.
    R. G. Collingwood thought that to express emotion is to come to understand it and that this is something art can enable us to do. The understanding in question is distinct from that offered by emotion concepts. I attempt to defend a broadly similar position by drawing, as Collingwood does, on a broader philosophy of mind. Emotions and other affective states have a profile analogous to the sensory profiles exhibited by the things we perceive. Grasping that one's feeling exhibits such (...)
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  22. added 2018-03-23
    Heidegger, Art, and the Overcoming of Metaphysics.Matt Dill - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):294-311.
    In this paper, I advance a new interpretation of Heidegger's reflections on art as we find them in his essay, ‘The Origin of the Work of Art’. I begin, in Section 1, by uncovering the fundamental concern that motivates Heidegger's essay. I show that Heidegger's reflections on art are part of his attempt to uncover a path beyond the history of metaphysics. I then suggest, in Section 2, that while Heidegger does think that art may allow for the overcoming of (...)
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  23. added 2018-03-20
    Adaptive Naturalism in Herder’s Aesthetics.Rachel Zuckert - 2015 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 36 (2):269-293.
    I discuss an apparent tension between two aspects of Johann Gottfried Herder’s aesthetic theory: his emphasis on and endorsement of art’s cultural embeddedness and historical variation, and his reliance on natural norms of artistic value. I propose that Herder’s essay, “Shakespeare,” suggests a possible resolution to this tension, a position I call “adaptive naturalism.” On this view, aesthetic value comprises a work’s capacity to promote the exercise of human natural capacities in harmony with the (natural or social) environment. Thus such (...)
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  24. added 2018-03-20
    Sculpture and Touch: Herder's Aesthetics of Sculpture.Rachel Zuckert - 2009 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (3):285-299.
    I present and analyze J.G. Herder’s aesthetics of sculpture, as an art form directed toward and appreciated by the sense of touch. I argue that Herder is unsuccessful in his attempt so to define sculpture, but his account is nonetheless fruitful, both in making salient and explaining signal aspects of sculptural appreciation and criticism and, more broadly and quite innovatively, in proposing an aesthetics of touch, even an embodied aesthetics.
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  25. added 2018-03-13
    The Space of Reception: Framing Autonomy and Collaboration.Jennifer A. McMahon & Carol A. Gilchrist - 2017 - In Brad Buckley & John Conomos (eds.), Who Runs the Artworld: Money, Power and Ethics. Faringdon, UK: Libri Publishing. pp. 201-212.
    In this paper we analyse the ideas implicit in the style of exhibition favoured by contemporary galleries and museums, and argue that unless the audience is empowered to ascribe meaning and significance to artwork through critical dialogue, the power not only of the audience is undermined but also of art. We argue that unless (i) indeterminacy is understood, (ii) the critical rather than coercive nature of art is facilitated, and (iii) the conditions for inter-subjectivity provided, galleries and museums preside over (...)
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  26. added 2018-03-13
    Between Philosophy and Art.Jennifer A. McMahon, Elizabeth B. Coleman, David Macarthur, James Phillips & Daniel von Sturmer - 2016 - Australasian Journal of Popular Culture 5 (2/3):135-150.
    Similarity and difference, patterns of variation, consistency and coherence: these are the reference points of the philosopher. Understanding experience, exploring ideas through particular instantiations, novel and innovative thinking: these are the reference points of the artist. However, at certain points in the proceedings of our Symposium titled, Next to Nothing: Art as Performance, this characterisation of philosopher and artist respectively might have been construed the other way around. The commentator/philosophers referenced their philosophical interests through the particular examples/instantiations created by the (...)
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  27. added 2018-03-05
    Periféria Kultúry, Periféria Umenia: Dubuffet Dnes.Adrián Kvokačka - 2015 - ESPES 4 (1):21-25.
    Globalization trends of culture, the idea of multiculturalism, bringing and acceptance of foreign elements into the culture, open coquetry of the "West" with culture and arts of the "East", eclecticism, but also paradoxical what happened to be the fate of modern art after postmodern deconstruction of the meaning and the reduction of his function to ability to serve in variable updating roles towards individual and society, is 46 years after the release of books Asphyxiating Culture repeatedly bringing me to read (...)
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  28. added 2018-02-22
    Freedom and the Value of Games.Jonathan Gingerich - 2018 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 48 (6):831-849.
    This essay explores the features in virtue of which games are valuable or worthwhile to play. The difficulty view of games holds that the goodness of games lies in their difficulty: by making activities more complex or making them require greater effort, they structure easier activities into more difficult, therefore more worthwhile, activities. I argue that a further source of the value of games is that they provide players with an experience of freedom, which they provide both as paradigmatically unnecessary (...)
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  29. added 2018-02-10
    Assessing Socially Engaged Art.Vid Simoniti - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (1):71-82.
    The last twenty-five years have seen a radical shift in the work of politically committed artists. No longer content to merely represent social reality, a new generation of artists has sought to change it, blending art with activism, social regeneration projects, and even violent political action. I assess how this form of contemporary art should lead us to rethink theories of artistic value and argue that these works make a convincing case for an often-dismissed position, namely, the pragmatic view of (...)
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  30. added 2018-01-10
    Del pathos, la extensión y la circunstancia del mundo para la experiencia del arte actual.Carlos Vanegas - 2016 - In ¿Arte sin estética? Medellín, Colombia: Universidad de Antioquia. pp. 131-166.
    Frente al interés por construir un discurso que dé cuenta del momento particular del arte contemporáneo, y que, además, pueda esclarecer y proponer diversas respuestas frente a los productos artísticos que se realizan en la difícil circunstancia actual, se han dirigido diferentes propuestas disciplinares que presentan análisis de la obra de arte y la experiencia que surge en su comprensión. La situación, que a veces se caracteriza por la impotencia de la teoría, la historia y la crítica del arte al (...)
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  31. added 2018-01-10
    La apariencia ( Schein ) en las Lecciones sobre la estética de G. W. F. Hegel.Carlos Vanegas - 2016 - Revista Estudios de Filosofía:33-55.
    Desde Platón el arte ha sido deslegitimado filosóficamente porque su elemento y su medio es la apariencia. De tal manera que, el ser y la verdad, según la antigua teoría, se encuentran en las ideas y no en las apariencias sensibles. Hegel está lejos de este platonismo en sus Lecciones sobre estética y, por el contrario, va a realizar una reivindicación de la apariencia en el arte. El interés de este artículo es indagar por la distinción entre apariencia que engaña, (...)
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  32. added 2018-01-10
    Ante la fragilidad de la memoria.Carlos Vanegas, Javier Domínguez, Carlos Arturo Fernández & Daniel Tobón - 2014 - In Carlos Vanegas, Javier Domínguez, Carlos Arturo Fernández & Daniel Tobón (eds.), El arte y la Fragilidad de la memoria. Medellín, Colombia: Sílaba Editores. pp. 259-275.
    Si no me falla la memoria, fue el dibujante Álvaro Barrios quien afirmó que el trabajo del artista contemporáneo colombiano se desarrolla según una agenda de trabajo. Si miramos algunos fenómenos del arte último en Colombia, podemos señalar que su agenda está determinada por el intento de comprensión de los procesos de la violencia en el país, a partir de una amplia gama de aproximaciones al concepto de memoria que ha tenido resonancia en las disciplinas humanísticas, las investigaciones académicas, el (...)
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  33. added 2018-01-10
    La esfera pública y El bar de las Folies Bergère de Edouard Manet.Carlos Vanegas - 2014 - Revista Colombiana de Pensamiento Estético E Historia Del Arte:121-137.
    The main discourses on art during the nineteenth century defined the artist as a spirit that should express their unbridled creativity, and overall that had the strength to express its total personal autonomy from institutional processes of culture. Thus, Manet’s work A bar at the Folies—Bergere contains substantial elements that express and help us to understand both the role of the artist, as the crisis of meaning in the work of modern art and problematic public sphere, treated by Haberma's as (...)
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  34. added 2017-11-17
    New Prospects for Aesthetic Hedonism.Mohan Matthen - forthcoming - In Jennifer A. McMahon (ed.), Social Aesthetics and Moral Judgment: Pleasure, Reflection and Accountability. London: Routledge.
    Because culture plays a role in determining the aesthetic merit of a work of art, intrinsically similar works can have different aesthetic merit when assessed in different cultures. This paper argues that a form of aesthetic hedonism is best placed to account for this relativity of aesthetic value. This form of hedonism is based on a functional account of aesthetic pleasure, according to which it motivates and enables mental engagement with artworks, and an account of pleasure-learning, in which it reinforces (...)
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  35. added 2017-09-07
    The Problem of Reading Confessions: Augustine’s Double Argument Against Drama.Gene Fendt - 1998 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 72:171-184.
    In Augustine's Confessions we can find two arguments against drama. One is entirely Platonic, echoing the problems raised in Republic 2 and 3 that representations of evil encourage moral turpitude. The other, an echo of Republic 10, is much more visible in Confessions, and Augustine is more perspicuous than Plato in laying out the difficulty; it has to do with the immoral effect of suffering grief at staged sufferings, where we are moved neither to escape the suffering nor to aid (...)
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  36. added 2017-09-05
    By Grace of Broken Skin: An Aesthetics of Inscriptive Development.Scott Zeman - 2009 - Radical Philosophy Review 12 (1-2):289-313.
    I address the question of the origins and historical meaning of art. Analyzing suggestions from Marx, Derrida, Winnicott, and Todorov, I claim that art doesn’t simply represent conscious, historical events but is also the continuing presentation of the prehistorical break-up of our “original” human family. Indeed,perpetuating yet distancing this archaic scene of community and violence in tension, art performs this mediation not just in history but also as history, as a secretive historiography of splitting and meaning-making. To this end, I (...)
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  37. added 2017-08-29
    Die Komödie der Tragödie: Shakespeares Sturm am Umschlagplatz von Mythos und Moderne, Rache und Recht, Tragik und Spiel.Katrin Trüstedt - 2011 - Konstanz: Konstanz University Press.
  38. added 2017-08-11
    Only a Promise of Happiness: The Place of Beauty in a World of Art. [REVIEW]Peg Zeglin Brand Weiser - 2007 - College Art Association Reviews:online.
    College Art Association Review of Nehemas' 2007 book on beauty that challenges his exclusion of consideration of issues of gender, i.e., I ask the questions, "whose beauty?" and "beauty for whom?".
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  39. added 2017-08-09
    The Sense of Art. [REVIEW]Peg Brand Weiser - 1990 - The Personalist Forum 6 (1):89-91.
    Review of 1989 text by Ralph A. Smith, noted art education scholar during the era of DBAE (Discipline Based Art Education), that criticizes the author's agenda to remedy the ills of the state of arts education, arts' secondary status to the sciences, pluralism, and popular ideologies of of contemporary culture as an agenda that is (below the surface) clearly conservative, male-centered, Eurocentric and elitist. My conclusion: "Educators, beware.".
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  40. added 2017-08-06
    Beauty Unlimited.Peg Zeglin Brand (ed.) - 2013 - Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.
    Emphasizing the human body in all of its forms, Beauty Unlimited expands the boundaries of what is meant by beauty both geographically and aesthetically. Peg Zeglin Brand and an international group of contributors interrogate the body and the meaning of physical beauty in this multidisciplinary volume. This striking and provocative book explores the history of bodily beautification; the physicality of socially or culturally determined choices of beautification; the interplay of gender, race, class, age, sexuality, and ethnicity within and on the (...)
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  41. added 2017-07-25
    Artistic Value is Attributive Goodness.Louise Hanson - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (4):415-427.
    It is common to distinguish between attributive and predicative goodness. There are good reasons to think that artistic value is a kind of attributive goodness. Surprisingly, however, much debate in philosophical aesthetics has proceeded as though artistic value is a kind of predicative goodness. As I shall argue, recognising that artistic value is attributive goodness has important consequences for a number of debates in aesthetics.
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  42. added 2017-06-28
    Na temat estetycznej teorii sztuki Nicka Zangwilla.Daniel Nathan - 2009 - Sztuka I Filozofia (Art and Philosophy) 35:7-16.
    This essay is a discussion and critical analysis of Nick Zangwill's theory of art. Zangwill's theory makes aesthetic intention (or "aesthetic insight") central to the status of art in various articles and in his book, Aesthetic Creation (OUP, 2007). The present essay focuses on the analysis found in his book and in particular whether Zangwill's theory adequately addresses the nature of avant-garde works of art. In the end, I argue that Zangwill's theory is both too narrow and too broad to (...)
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  43. added 2017-06-24
    The Aesthetic Potential of the Element of Earth.Marzenna Jakubczak - 2002 - Analecta Husserliana:253-263.
  44. added 2017-06-20
    Howard Hawks and John Ford Resurgent.Raymond Aaron Younis - 1995 - Cinema Papers (1995).
    On the aesthetics and poetics of Hawks and Ford; their resurgence in film studies.
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  45. added 2017-06-07
    “L’Art, le temps et la métamorphose : Un aspect révolutionnaire de la théorie de l'art d’André Malraux”.Derek Allan - 2107 - Frankofoni 30 (Feb/March):135-146.
    Explains a key aspect of Malraux's theory of art – his explanation of the nature of artistic creation. The question is widely neglected in modern aesthetics.
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  46. added 2017-06-02
    Why Do We Need to Define ‘Art’ ? Because It Greatly Enhances the Encounter with Art Itself.Jakob Zaaiman - 2017 - Alldaynight.Info.
    Modern art has yet to be properly explained and given its own distinctive and authentic philosophy. It is almost always portrayed – openly or subliminally – as if it were somehow striving for much the same objectives as classical art, though perhaps by very different means. This has the effect of making modern artworks look slightly ridiculous in comparison with the grandeur of their classical counterparts, at the same time as making it an uphill struggle to try to argue the (...)
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  47. added 2017-05-30
    The Distinct Basic Good of Aesthetic Experience and Its Political Import.Michael R. Spicher - 2013 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 87 (4):711 - 729.
    To protect art under the First Amendment, John Finnis claims that art is simply the expression of emotion. Later, to protect aesthetic experience from subjectivity, Finnis claims that aesthetic experience is just a form of knowledge. However, neither of these claims adequately accounts for the nature of their objects nor fully protects them. The expression of emotion—intrinsic to art in Finnis’s view—is not always clear or even present, yet people can still appreciate the work. Equally problematic, aesthetic experience is not (...)
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  48. added 2017-03-20
    Art as Anti-Destiny: Foundations of Andre Malraux's THeory of Art.Derek Allan - 2003 - Literature & Aesthetics 13 (2):7-16.
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  49. added 2017-03-06
    Beyond Art.Dominic McIver Lopes - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    This book offers a bold new approach to the philosophy of art. General theories of art don't work: they can't deal with problem cases. Instead of trying to define art, we should accept that a work of art is nothing but a work in one of the arts. Lopes's buck passing theory works well for the avant garde, illuminating its radical provocations.
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  50. added 2017-02-28
    Fleshy Canvas.Kimberly Baltzer-Jaray & Tanya Rodriguez - 2012 - In Robert Arp (ed.), Tattoos — Philosophy for Everyone: I Ink, Therefore I Am. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 38-50.
    In this paper, we first investigate a bit of feminist and hermeneutical aesthetics. Building upon these theories, we expand the discussion of art to include the fleshy canvas.We argue that a feminist philosophy of art suggests a sound theoretical framework by which one can maintain that skin art is just that – art. In its contemporary practice, tattooing has become a new form of art, and feminist theory provides context for interpretation. The tattooed body may agitate conventional conceptions of fine (...)
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