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  1. added 2020-05-22
    To Be or Never to Have Been: Anti-Natalism and a Life Worth Living.Aaron Smuts - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (4):711-729.
    David Benatar argues that being brought into existence is always a net harm and never a benefit. I disagree. I argue that if you bring someone into existence who lives a life worth living, then you have not all things considered wronged her. Lives are worth living if they are high in various objective goods and low in objective bads. These lives constitute a net benefit. In contrast, lives worth avoiding constitute a net harm. Lives worth avoiding are net high (...)
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  2. added 2020-05-22
    Is Life Worth Living?William James - 1895 - International Journal of Ethics 6 (1):1-24.
    Reprinted in James The Will to Believe and Other Essays.
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  3. added 2020-05-11
    Public Views About Quality of Life and Treatment Withdrawal in Infants: Limitations and Directions for Future Research.Ryan H. Nelson - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (1):20-21.
    Work done within the realm of what is sometimes called ‘descriptive ethics’ brings two questions readily to mind: How can empirical findings, in general, inform normative debates? and How can these empirical findings, in particular, inform the normative debate at hand? Brick et al 1 confront these questions in their novel investigation of public views about lives worth living and the permissibility of withdrawing life-sustaining treatment from critically ill infants. Mindful of the is-ought gap, the authors suggest modestly that their (...)
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  4. added 2020-05-11
    Considering Quality of Life While Repudiating Disability Injustice: A Pathways Approach to Setting Priorities.Govind Persad - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (2):294-303.
    This article proposes a novel strategy, one that draws on insights from antidiscrimination law, for addressing a persistent challenge in medical ethics and the philosophy of disability: whether health systems can consider quality of life without unjustly discriminating against individuals with disabilities. It argues that rather than uniformly considering or ignoring quality of life, health systems should take a more nuanced approach. Under the article's proposal, health systems should treat cases where quality of life suffers because of disability-focused exclusion or (...)
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  5. added 2020-05-11
    The Deep Error of Political Libertarianism: Self-Ownership, Choice, and What’s Really Valuable in Life.Dan Lowe - 2018 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-23.
    Contemporary versions of natural rights libertarianism trace their locus classicus to Robert Nozick’s Anarchy, State, and Utopia. But although there have been many criticisms of the version of political libertarianism put forward by Nozick, many of these fail objections to meet basic methodological desiderata. Thus, Nozick’s libertarianism deserves to be re-examined. In this paper I develop a new argument which meets these desiderata. Specifically, I argue that the libertarian conception of self-ownership, the view’s foundation, implies what I call the Asymmetrical (...)
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  6. added 2020-05-11
    Will Life Be Worth Living in a World Without Work? Technological Unemployment and the Meaning of Life.John Danaher - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):41-64.
    Suppose we are about to enter an era of increasing technological unemployment. What implications does this have for society? Two distinct ethical/social issues would seem to arise. The first is one of distributive justice: how will the efficiency gains from automated labour be distributed through society? The second is one of personal fulfillment and meaning: if people no longer have to work, what will they do with their lives? In this article, I set aside the first issue and focus on (...)
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  7. added 2020-05-11
    The Influence of Activeness and Independence on the Quality of Life of Senior Citizens.Edyta Bonk - 2016 - Polish Psychological Bulletin 47 (3):338-345.
    In this study the author has focused on the impact of activeness and independence on the quality of life of seniors. Activeness is taken to mean the participation in regular everyday tasks. Functional independence is independence in everyday life. Quality of life in old age describes the level of satisfaction with life and indicators of successful ageing. The survey was conducted in October 2013 among four groups of seniors. Two variables determined the distribution of respondents: the level of activeness and (...)
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  8. added 2020-05-11
    Justifying Terminal Care by 'Retrospective Quality-Adjusted Life-Years'.C. Cowley - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (5):290-292.
    A lot of medical procedures can be justified in terms of the number of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) they can be expected to generate; that is, the number of extra years that the procedure will provide, with the quality of life during those extra years factored in. QALYs are a crude tool, but good enough for many decisions. Notoriously, however, they cannot justify spending any money on terminal care (and indeed on older people in general). In this paper I suggest a (...)
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  9. added 2020-05-11
    Income and Quality of Life: Does the Love of Money Make a Difference?T. L. P. Tang - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 72 (4):375-393.
    This paper examines a model of income and quality of life that controls the love of money, job satisfaction, gender, and marital status and treats employment status (full-time versus part-time), income level, and gender as moderators. For the whole sample, income was not significantly related to quality of life when this path was examined alone. When all variables were controlled, income was negatively related to quality of life. When (1) the love of money was negatively correlated to job satisfaction and (...)
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  10. added 2020-05-11
    Without Animals Life is Not Worth Living.Freya Mathews - 2007 - Between the Species 13 (7):4.
  11. added 2020-05-11
    Quality of Life: The Contested Rhetoric of Resource Allocation and End-of-Life Decision Making.David Nantais & Mark Kuczewski - 2004 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (6):651 – 664.
    The term "quality of life" has a long history in the bioethics literature. It is usually used in one of two contexts: in resource allocation discussions in the hope of arriving at an objective measure of the worth of an intervention; and in end-of-life discussions as a concept that can justify the forgoing of life-sustaining treatment. In both contexts, the term has valid uses as it is meant to measure the efficacy of a treatment. However, the term has the unfortunate (...)
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  12. added 2020-05-11
    Principles and Problems in the Assessment of Quality of Life in Health Care.Ray Fitzpatrick - 1999 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 2 (1):37-46.
    A remarkable surge in efforts to assess the quality of life of patients has occurred in recent years in medical research. Philosophical discussions of these developments have focused, on the one hand, on epistemological reservations about the plausibility of measuring quality of life and, on the other hand, on moral and ethical qualms about the meaning of life conveyed in such assessments. Whilst providing an important note of caution, such critiques fail to recognise two basic principles of quality of life (...)
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  13. added 2020-05-11
    Quality of Life and the Practice of Medicine Report.Basil Mitchell, Michael Banner & Ian Ranmsey Centre - 1995 - Ian Ramsey Centre.
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  14. added 2020-05-11
    Energy, Environment and Quality of Life.Eas Sarma - 1993 - In S. Z. Qasim (ed.), Science and Quality of Life. Offsetters. pp. 105.
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  15. added 2020-05-11
    Financial Systems and Quality of Life: S&T Make a Difference.Kalyan M. Raipuria - 1993 - In S. Z. Qasim (ed.), Science and Quality of Life. Offsetters. pp. 183.
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  16. added 2020-05-11
    The Business of Living and the Quality of Life.Sitakant Mai-Iapatra - 1993 - In S. Z. Qasim (ed.), Science and Quality of Life. Offsetters.
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  17. added 2020-05-11
    Quality of Life the New Medical Dilemma.James J. Walter & Thomas A. Shannon - 1990
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  18. added 2020-05-11
    Quality of Life as a Criterion for Allocation of Life-Sustaining Treatment: The Case of Hemodialysis.C. E. Ferrans - 1987 - In Gary R. Anderson & Valerie A. Glesnes-Anderson (eds.), Health Care Ethics: A Guide for Decision Makers. Aspen Publishers.
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  19. added 2020-05-11
    The Sanctity-of-Life Doctrine in Medicine: A Critique.Helga Kuhse - 1987 - Oxford University Press.
    According to the "sanctity-of-life" view, all human lives are equally valuable and inviolable, and it would be wrong to base life-and-death medical decisions on the quality of the patient's life. Examining the ideas and assumptions behind the sanctity-of-life view, Kuhse argues against the traditional view that allowing someone to die is morally different from killing, and shows that quality-of-life judgments are ubiquitous. Refuting the sanctity-of-life view, she provides a sketch of a quality-of-life ethics based on the belief that there is (...)
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  20. added 2020-05-11
    Social Factors and Company Location Decisions: Technology, Quality of Life and Quality of Work Life Concerns. [REVIEW]Michael A. Hitt, Orley M. Amos & Larkin Warner - 1983 - Journal of Business Ethics 2 (2):89 - 98.
    A number of factors must be considered in facility location decisions. Recent research on job design suggests that the effects jobs may have on quality of work life and quality of life in general should be considered in facility location decisions in addition to other normal factors. The present study was designed to examine quality of work life and quality of life factors of residents in a low income and low education area. The intent was to determine what types of (...)
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  21. added 2020-03-24
    The Most Valuable Player.Stephen Kershnar & Neil Feit - 2001 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 28 (2):193-206.
    The most valuable player (MVP) of an athletic league is the single best individual player in the league. The MVP award is the institutional recognition of this person, and it is the highest annual award that a player can receive. Despite its widespread consideration and importance, we argue that the concept of the MVP is a fundamentally vague concept. In the context of professional sports, however, such a vague category is valuable in that it promotes the active discussion of different (...)
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  22. added 2020-03-10
    The Quality of Life: Aristotle Revised.Richard Kraut - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
    Richard Kraut presents a new theory of human well-being. Kraut's principal idea, Aristotelian in spirit, is that 'external goods' have at most an indirect bearing on the quality of our lives. A good internal life - one with quality emotional, intellectual, social, and perceptual experiences - is what well-being consists in.
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  23. added 2020-03-10
    Euthanasia and Quality of Life.John K. DiBaise - 2017 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 17 (3):417-424.
    Euthanasia advocates argue that end-of-life decisions should be based on patients’ autonomous evaluations of their own quality of life. The question is whether a patient’s quality of life has deteriorated so far as to make death a benefit. Criteria for evaluating quality of life are, however, unavoidably arbitrary and unjust. The concept is difficult to define, and human autonomy has limits. This essay discusses the moral issues raised by quality-of-life judgments at the end of life: who makes them, what criteria (...)
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  24. added 2020-03-10
    Quality Versus Quantity: The Complexities of Quality of Life Determinations for Neonatal Nurses.Janet Green, Philip Darbyshire, Anne Adams & Debra Jackson - 2017 - Nursing Ethics 24 (7):802-820.
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  25. added 2020-03-10
    Self-Esteem, Extraversion, Neuroticism and Health As Predictors of Quality of Life.Gabriela Mikulášková & Peter Babinčák - 2015 - Human Affairs 25 (4):411-420.
    The study verified self-esteem, extraversion, neuroticism and health as predictors of subjectively-assessed quality of life. The sample included 109 adolescents. The research tools used were WHOQOL-BREF, Rosenberg´s self-esteem scale and NEO-FFI personality questionnaire. The results were processed using the multiple linear regression analysis stepwise method. Health was not found to be a predictor of subjectively-assessed quality of life in the research sample. Self-esteem was found to be a predictor of psychological and environmental quality of life. Neuroticism was confirmed as a (...)
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  26. added 2020-03-10
    How Do Physicians Perceive Quality of Life? Ethical Questioning in Neonatology.Marie-Ange Einaudi, Catherine Gire, Pascal Auquier & Pierre Le Coz - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):50.
    The outcome of very preterm infants is marked by the development of complications that can have an impact on the quality of life of the children and their families. The concept of quality of life and its evaluation in the long term raise semantic and ethical problems for French physicians in perinatal care. Our reflection aims to gain a better understanding of the representations surrounding quality of life in neonatal medicine.
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  27. added 2020-03-10
    Quality of Life: Policy Concept and Reality.Taku Yamamoto - 2014 - Japanese Journal of Political Science 15 (2):163-182.
    This study examines the process by which the concept of quality of life has been increasing in importance as the key to ASEAN's socio-cultural integration. This study also focuses on the current trend that emphasizes subjective quality of life and clarifies that ASEAN has been moving toward including this perspective. Then, it analyzes the subjective quality of life of people in ASEAN in terms of self-assessment and the multidimensional World Health Organization Quality of Life metric by using data from the (...)
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  28. added 2020-03-10
    Quality of Life Assessments, Cognitive Reliability, and Procreative Responsibility.Jason Marsh - 2014 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 89 (2):436-466.
    Recent work in the psychology of happiness has led some to conclude that we are unreliable assessors of our lives and that skepticism about whether we are happy is a genuine possibility worth taking very seriously. I argue that such claims, if true, have worrisome implications for procreation. In particular, they show that skepticism about whether many if not most people are well positioned to create persons is a genuine possibility worth taking very seriously. This skeptical worry should not be (...)
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  29. added 2020-03-10
    Detecting When “Quality of Life” Has Been “Enhanced”: Estimating Change in Quality of Life Ratings.Rochelle E. Tractenberg, Futoshi Yumoto & Paul S. Aisen - 2013 - Open Journal of Philosophy 3 (4):24.
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  30. added 2020-03-10
    Quality of Life is a Process Not an Outcome.Leah McClimans & John P. Browne - 2012 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (4):279-292.
    Quality improvement mechanisms increasingly use outcome measures to evaluate health care providers. This move toward outcome measures is a radical departure from the traditional focus on process measures. More radical still is the proposal to shift from relatively simple and proximal measures of outcome, such as mortality, to complex outcomes, such as quality of life. While the practical, scientific, and ethical issues associated with the use of outcomes such as mortality and morbidity to compare health care providers have been well (...)
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  31. added 2020-03-10
    A Life Worth Giving? The Threshold for Permissible Withdrawal of Life Support From Disabled Newborn Infants.Dominic James Wilkinson - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (2):20 - 32.
    When is it permissible to allow a newborn infant to die on the basis of their future quality of life? The prevailing official view is that treatment may be withdrawn only if the burdens in an infant's future life outweigh the benefits. In this paper I outline and defend an alternative view. On the Threshold View, treatment may be withdrawn from infants if their future well-being is below a threshold that is close to, but above the zero-point of well-being. I (...)
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  32. added 2020-03-10
    Genetically Engineering Human-Animal Chimeras and Lives Worth Living.Dennis R. Cooley - 2008 - Between the Species 13 (8):1.
    Genetic engineering often generates fear of out of control scientists creating Frankenstein creatures that will terrorize the general populace, especially in the cases of human-animal chimeras. While sometimes an accurate characterization of some researchers, this belief is often the result of repugnance for new technology rather than being rationally justified. To facilitate thoughtful discussion the moral issues raised by human-animal chimeras, ethicists and other stakeholders must develop a rational ethical framework before raw emotion has a chance of becoming the dominating (...)
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  33. added 2020-03-10
    Agricultural Biotechnology and Quality of Life: What Counts as Quality?Ruth Chadwick - unknown
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  34. added 2020-03-10
    Quality of Life and the Critically Ill Newborn: Life and Death Decision Making in the Neonatal Context.Michael R. Panicola - 2000 - Dissertation, Saint Louis University
    Therapeutic and technologic innovations in neonatal medicine have made it possible to save many critically ill newborns who would have died in the past. Unfortunately, some newborns saved survive only briefly despite aggressive attempts to keep them alive, while others survive long-term only to live in tragically impaired states. Given this reality, the question no longer is "Can we save this newborn's life?" but "What kind of life are we saving?" This shift in the question manifestly indicates that quality of (...)
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  35. added 2020-03-10
    Deciding Not to Treat Handicapped Infants: When is Life Not Worth Living?Barbara Anne Stock - 1999 - Dissertation, Syracuse University
    The purpose of my dissertation is to examine under what conditions life sustaining medical treatment is in an infant's best interest. Specifically, if an infant is expected to be conscious and capable of experiencing pleasure, and her prognosis does not include great suffering, are there any further conditions that must be met for survival to be good for her? I call accounts that assert that there are further conditions "Having a Life" accounts. These accounts propose non-hedonic requirements which must be (...)
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  36. added 2020-03-10
    The Relation Between Concepts of Quality-of-Life, Health and Happiness.A. W. Musschenga - 1997 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 22 (1):11-28.
    In the last two decades, the term “quality-of-life” has become popular in medicine and health care. There are, however, important differences in the meaning and the use of the term. The message of all quality-of-life talk is that medicine and health care are not valuable in themselves. They are valuable to the extent that they contribute to the quality of life of patients. The ultimate aims of medicine and health care are not health or prolongation of life as such, but (...)
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  37. added 2020-03-10
    Euthanasia and the Quality of Life Debate.J. Breck - 1995 - Christian Bioethics 1 (3):322-337.
    Orthodox Christian ethics is grounded in the sacredness of life principle. Yet, it can accept a quality of life approach where “quality” refers not to capacities or states, but to the relationship between the patient's condition and the quest for transcendent life goals (Walter and Shannon, 1990). The true quality of human life derives from the vocation to stewardship, which enjoins an attitude of humble acceptance toward beneficial or “redemptive” suffering. The proper response to suffering in terminal cases is not (...)
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  38. added 2020-03-10
    Quality of Life and Quality of Person's New Role for Well-Being Measures.Robert E. Lane - 1994 - Political Theory 22 (2):1996.
  39. added 2020-03-10
    Quality of Life in Cancer Patients--An Hypothesis.K. C. Calman - 1984 - Journal of Medical Ethics 10 (3):124-127.
    Quality of life is a difficult concept to define and to measure. An hypothesis is proposed which suggests that the quality of life measures the difference, or the gap, at a particular period of time between the hopes and expectations of the individual and that individual's present experiences. Quality of life can only be described by the individual, and must take into account many aspects of life. The approach is goal-orientated, and one of task analysis. The hypothesis is developed in (...)
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  40. added 2020-03-10
    Measuring Patients' Quality of Life and the Perceived Quality in Long Term Care Services.Tatiana da Costa Cabrita - unknown
    With the ageing of the Portuguese population, there are more people in dependency situations and needing long-term care (LTC). In this context, it is important to ensure the quality of life (QoL) of those individuals, and that quality can be measured through their health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and overall well-being. Also, understanding how perceived service quality (PSQ) can be related to how people perceive their QoL is pertinent since service quality is an important factor to achieve patient health outcomes. (...)
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  41. added 2020-02-19
    Death and Prudential Deprivation.Matthew W. G. McClure - forthcoming - Pense (Edinburgh University) 1.
    Dying is (sometimes) bad for the dier because it prevents her from being the subject of wellbeing she otherwise would (the deprivation account). I argue for this from a (plausible) principle about which futures are bad for a prudential subject (the future-comparison principle). A strengthening of this principle yields that death is not always bad, and that the badness of death does not consist in that it destroys the dier.
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  42. added 2020-02-19
    Prudence, Sunk Costs, and the Temporally Extended Self.Antti Kauppinen - forthcoming - Journal of Moral Philosophy.
    Many find it reasonable to take our past actions into account when making choices for the future. In this paper, I address two important issues regarding taking past investments into account in prudential deliberation. The first is the charge that doing so commits the fallacy of honoring sunk costs. I argue that while it is indeed irrational to care about sunk costs, past investments are not sunk costs when we can change their teleological significance, roughly their contribution to our excellence (...)
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  43. added 2019-12-30
    Formalizing the intuitions on the meaning of life / Formalizando as intuições sobre o sentido da vida.Rodrigo Cid - 2010 - Revista Do Seminário Dos Alunos Do PPGLM/UFRJ 1:paper 10.
    When we ask ourselves about the meaning of life, two analyses are possible in principle: 1. that we are asking something about the purpose or the reason of being of life or of a life, or 2. that we are asking something the value of life or of a life. At the present article, I do not approach 1 neither the life as a whole, but I take the individual lives in the context of 2. I briefly explain what would (...)
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  44. added 2019-10-07
    Review of Cheshire Calhoun's Doing Valuable Time. [REVIEW]Antti Kauppinen - forthcoming - Philosophical Review.
    This is a book review of Cheshire Calhoun's 2018 book, Doing Valuable Time.
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  45. added 2019-09-25
    A Unified Theory Of Intrinsic Value.Stephen Kershnar - 2007 - Reason Papers 29:19-40.
    There is a series of candidates for the ground of intrinsic value. Different theories posit that the ground consists of some or all of the following: types of experiences, desire-satisfaction, virtue, meaningful relationships, true beliefs, desert-satisfaction, etc. The ground can be local or global depending on whether it grounds value of a spatial, temporal, or fact-specific part of the universe (e.g., Jones enjoying this ice cream) or all facts considered (e.g., the universe over time). In this paper, I argue that (...)
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  46. added 2019-06-24
    How Human Life Matters in the Universe: A Reply to David Benatar.Brooke Alan Trisel - 2019 - Journal of Philosophy of Life 9 (1):1-15.
    In his book, The Human Predicament, David Benatar claims that our individual lives and human life, in general, do not make a difference beyond Earth and, therefore, are meaningless from the vast, cosmic perspective. In this paper, I will explain how what we do matters from the cosmic perspective. I will provide examples of how human beings have transcended our limits, thereby giving human life some meaning from the cosmic perspective. Also, I will argue that human life could become even (...)
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  47. added 2019-05-31
    Permissible Killing and the Irrelevance of Being Human.Rahul Kumar - 2007 - Journal of Ethics 12 (1):57-80.
    This is a review essay of Jeff McMahan's recent book The Ethics of Killing : Problems at the Margins of Life. In the first part, I lay out the central features of McMahan's account of the wrongness of killing and its implications for when it is permissible to kill. In the second part of the essay, I argue that we ought not to accept McMahan's rejection of species membership as having any bearing on whether it is permissible to kill a (...)
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  48. added 2019-04-22
    Better Never to Have Been: The Harm of Coming Into Existence – David Benatar.Saul Smilansky - 2008 - Philosophical Quarterly 58 (232):569–571.
  49. added 2019-04-22
    All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten: Reconsidered, Revised & Expanded with Twenty-Five New Essays.Robert Fulghum - 2003 - Ballantine Books.
    Fifteen years ago, Robert Fulghum published a simple credo–a credo that became the phenomenal #1 New York Times bestseller All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten . Now, seven million copies later, Fulghum returns to the book that was embraced around the world. He has written a new preface and twenty-five essays, which add even more potency to a common, though no less relevant, piece of wisdom: that the most basic aspects of life bear its most important (...)
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  50. added 2019-04-22
    The Everyday Life Reader.Ben Highmore (ed.) - 2002 - Routledge.
    The Everyday Life Reader brings together a wide range of thinkers from Freud to Baudrillard with primary sources on everyday life such as the Mass Observation survey and key texts by Michel de Certeau and Henri Lefebvre, to provide a comprehensive resource on theories of everyday life. Ben Highmore's introduction surveys the development of thought about everyday life, setting theories in their social and historical context, and each themed section opens with an essay introducing the debates. Sections include: * Situating (...)
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