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1 — 50 / 72
  1. The Spring of Action: In Butō Improvisation.Carla Bagnoli - forthcoming - In Routledge Handbook Philosophy of Improvisation in the Arts. London: Routledge.
    This chapter discusses butō dance as an example of improvisation that challenges not only the extant philosophical definitions of improvisation, but also some fundamental presumptions about self-government and agency that are current in action theory. In the first part of the chapter, I identify the main features of butō improvisation, with regard to the nature of its basic movement, and the kind of subjectivity implicated in its generation. I then raise some questions regarding the philosophical characterization of this form of (...)
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  2. Tragedy as a Symbol of Autonomy in Schiller's Aesthetics.Timothy Stoll - forthcoming - British Journal of Aesthetics.
  3. “Aesthetic Ideas”: Mystery and Meaning in the Early Work of Barrie Kosky.Jennifer A. McMahon - 2021 - In James Phillips & John Severn (eds.), Barrie Kosky’s Transnational Theatres. New York, NY, USA: Springer. pp. 59-80.
    In this chapter I invite the reader to consider the philosophical assumptions which underpin the early career aims and objectives of Barrie Kosky. A focus will be his “language” of opera, and the processes by which the audience is prompted to interpret it. The result will be to see how Kosky creates mystery and meaning while avoiding fantasy and escapism; and can express psychological truth while stimulating subjective interpretations. The point will be to show that Kosky’s oeuvre demonstrates a central (...)
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  4. The Problems of Viewing Performance: Epistemology and Other Minds.Michael Y. Bennett - 2021 - London, UK: Routledge.
    The Problems of Viewing Performance challenges long-held assumptions by considering the ways in which knowledge is received by more than a single audience member, and breaks new ground by, counterintuitively, claiming that viewing performance is not a shared experience. Given that viewers come to each performance with differing amounts and types of knowledge, they each make different assumptions as to how the performance will unfold. Often modified by other viewers and often after the performance event, knowledge of performance is made (...)
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  5. Intrinsic-Extrinsic Properties in Theater.Michael Y. Bennett - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (1):34-38.
    David Friedell has recently discussed the relationship between intrinsic and extrinsic properties of art, specifically in music. Friedell claims that normative social rules dictate who can change the intrinsic or extrinsic properties of a piece of music. I claim that in text-based theater—as a particular art form—the dividing line between intrinsic and extrinsic properties of a play is sometimes tenuous. This tenuousness is due to a play's bifurcated existence as a dramatic text and as many theatrical performances.
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  6. Externalization on Stage: The Exil Ensemble’s Hamletmaschine.Katrin Trüstedt - 2020 - In Martin Jörg Schäfer & Karin Nissen-Rizvani (eds.), TogetherText: Prozessual erzeugte Texte im Gegenwartstheater. Berlin, Germany: pp. 142–155.
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  7. "The Philosophy of Theater".Michael Y. Bennett - 2020 - Oxford Bibliographies.
    Theater—i.e., traditional text-based theater—is often considered the art form that most closely resembles lived life: real bodies in space play out a story through the passage of time. Because of this, theater (or theatre) has long been a laboratory of, and for, philosophical thought and reflection. The study of philosophy and theater has a history that dates back to, and flourished in, ancient Greece and Rome. While philosophers over the centuries have revisited the study of theater, the past four decades (...)
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  8. Review of Siddhartha Biswas's Theatre Theory and Performance: A Critical Interrogation. [REVIEW]Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2019 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 124 (9):672-4.
    Biswas's book is a panoramic treatment of contemporary world theatre. The book under review will help both the neophyte, as also a scholar to negotiate ancient dramaturgy and more recent theatre. Biswas's eye for details is also remarked in this review. The review shows how Biswas, as it were, has written a manifesto of protest in this book.
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  9. La sociedad del espectáculo de Guy Debord: 50 años después.José Ramón Fabelo Corzo - 2019 - In José Ramón Fabelo Corzo & Mayra Sánchez Medina (eds.), Coordenadas epistemológicas para una estética en construcción. Puebla, Pue., México: pp. 259-274.
    En 1967, el francés Guy Debord escribía un resonante texto, La sociedad del espectáculo, en el que nos ofrece una penetrante y aguda reflexión sobre la sociedad de consumo —cuya experiencia directa vive en la Francia de la posguerra—, donde florece la economía de la abundancia, la industria del ocio, la generalización de los medios de comunicación audiovisual y la propagación del llamado american way of life. Anclado fuertemente en las ideas de Marx sobre la alienación y el fetichismo mercantil, (...)
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  10. GJESDAL, KRISTIN. Ibsen's Hedda Gabler —Philosophical Perspectives. Oxford University Press, 2018, 272 Pp., $29.95, Paper. [REVIEW]Lior Levy - 2019 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 77 (2):215-219.
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  11. Alienation and Affirmation: The Comedy of Heiner Müller’s Hamletmaschine.Katrin Trüstedt - 2019 - Brecht Yearbook 44:102-121.
    Against the tendency to regard Müller as a tragedian and his Hamletmaschine as a tragedy, I will read his play as an experiment on the possibility of comedic theater after Brecht. Hamletmaschine can thus be understood as an attempt to affirm the possibilities of theater and its own forms of estrangement without abstracting from tragedy, alienation, and negativity. The play contains three such models internally connecting alienation and affirmation: while “Hamlet” in his commitment to the negativity of a lost tragedy (...)
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  12. “Propositions in Theatre: Theatrical Utterances as Events”.Michael Y. Bennett - 2018 - Journal of Literary Semantics 47 (2):147-152.
    Using William Shakespeare’s Hamlet and the play-within-the play, The Murder of Gonzago, as a case study, this essay argues that theatrical utterances constitute a special case of language usage not previously elucidated: the utterance of a statement with propositional content in theatre functions as an event. In short, the propositional content of a particular p (e.g. p1, p2, p3 …), whether or not it is true, is only understood—and understood to be true—if p1 is uttered in a particular time, place, (...)
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  13. A Theater of Ideas: Performance and Performativity in Kierkegaard’s Repetition.Martijn Boven - 2018 - In Eric Jozef Ziolkowski (ed.), Kierkegaard, Literature, and the Arts. Evanston, IL, USA: pp. 115-130.
    In this essay, I argue that Søren Kierkegaard’s oeuvre can be seen as a theater of ideas. This argument is developed in three steps. First, I will briefly introduce a theoretical framework for addressing the theatrical dimension of Kierkegaard’s works. This framework is based on a distinction between“performative writing strategies” and “categories of performativity.” As a second step, I will focus on Repetition: A Venture in Experimenting Psychology, by Constantin Constantius, one of the best examples of Kierkegaard’s innovative way of (...)
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  14. Alienation und Affirmation. Die Komödie der Negativität in Heiner Müllers Hamletmaschine.Katrin Trüstedt - 2018 - In Thomas Khurana, Francesca Raimondi, Dirk Setton, Dirk Quadflieg & Juliane Rebentisch (eds.), Negativität: Kunst - Recht - Politik. Berlin, Deutschland: pp. 65-79.
    Entgegen der Tendenz, Heiner Müller als Tragiker und seine Hamletmaschine als Tragödie zu deuten, will ich diese im Folgenden als eine spezifische Form von Komödie lesen – eine Komödie, die dabei gleichzeitig eine bestimmte Gegenwart der Tragödie in sich enthält.
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  15. "How came that widow in?" Entzogene Fluchtgeschichten auf der Bühne.Katrin Trüstedt - 2018 - In Bettine Menke & Juliane Vogel (eds.), Flucht und Szene. Berlin, Deutschland:
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  16. Analytic Philosophy and the World of the Play.Michael Y. Bennett - 2017 - London: Routledge.
    Theatrical characters’ dual existence on stage and in text presents a unique, challenging case for the analytical philosopher. -/- Analytic Philosophy and the World of the Play re-examines the ontological status of theatre and its fictional objects through the "possible worlds" thesis, arguing that theatre is not a mirror of our world, but a re-creation of it. Taking a fresh look at theatre’s key elements, including the hotly contested relationships between character and actor; onstage and offstage "worlds"; and the play-text (...)
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  17. Magic: The Art of the Impossible.Jason Leddington - 2017 - In David Goldblatt, Lee B. Brown & Stephanie Patridge (eds.), Aesthetics: A Reader in the Philosophy of the Arts. New York, USA: Routledge. pp. 373-379.
    An introduction to the philosophical study of theatrical magic.
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  18. The Philosophy of Theatre, Drama and Acting.Tom Stern - 2017 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    A collection of new essays on the philosophy of theatre and the philosophy of drama, combining historical perspectives and new directions.
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  19. Teatro y Estética del Oprimido. Homenaje a Augusto Boal.José Ramón Fabelo Corzo & Ana Lucero López Troncoso (eds.) - 2016 - Puebla, Pue., México: Colección La Fuente, BUAP.
    Este libro inaugura la serie Homenaje de la Colección La Fuente. Con él se busca reconocer, de manera particular, al pensador, dramaturgo y director brasileño Augusto Boal (1931-2009), creador del teatro y la estética del oprimido, genuina aportación cultural latinoamericana que mucho tiene que ver con ese particular lugar de enunciación que es Nuestra América y sus siempre actuales expectativas emancipadoras. El libro fue precedido y nutrido por un Coloquio que en mayo de 2014 reunió a importantes especialistas y seguidores (...)
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  20. ¿Qué hacer con el legado teórico-práctico de Augusto Boal? (A modo de Presentación).José Ramón Fabelo Corzo & Ana Lucero López Troncoso - 2016 - In José Ramón Fabelo Corzo & Ana Lucero López Troncoso (eds.), Teatro y Estética del Oprimido. Homenaje a Augusto Boal. Puebla, Pue., México: pp. 11-21.
    El texto sirve como capítulo introductorio y de presentación del libro Teatro y Estética del Oprimido. Homenaje a Augusto Boal. Se reflexiona y evalúa críticamente sobre los diferentes "usos" que se hacen del legado teórico-práctico de Augusto Boal, lo que se hace y lo que, ajuicio de los autores, se debe hacer con él. Se describe además las fuentes y el contenido capitular del libro en cuestión.
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  21. Culture-Blind Shakespeare: Multiculturalism and Diversity.Ali Salami (ed.) - 2016 - New Castle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
    This collection of essays offers a panoramic plethora of responses to Shakespeare by both Western and Eastern critics, indicating that the Bard crosses all nationalities and deserves to be defined as a global writer, which is why he is easily appreciated, manipulated, translated, adapted, and interpreted by everyone everywhere. Divided into three parts, this volume deals with a wide range of issues on culture and multiculturalism, and hammers home the idea that the works of Shakespeare can be not only universally (...)
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  22. Van Steen Stage of Emergency: Theater and Public Performance Under the Greek Military Dictatorship of 1967–1974 . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015. Pp. Xiii + 376. £80. 9780198718321. [REVIEW]Elke Steinmeyer - 2016 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 136:305-306.
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  23. All the World’s a Stage. [REVIEW]Aili Bresnahan - 2015 - The Philosophers' Magazine 69:125-126.
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  24. Improvisation in the Arts.Aili Bresnahan - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (9):573-582.
    This article focuses primarily on improvisation in the arts as discussed in philosophical aesthetics, supplemented with accounts of improvisational practice by arts theorists and educators. It begins with an overview of the term improvisation, first as it is used in general and then as it is used to describe particular products and practices in the individual arts. From here, questions and challenges that improvisation raises for the traditional work-of-art concept, the type-token distinction, and the appreciation and evaluation of the arts (...)
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  25. Review of Acts: Theater, Philosophy, and the Performing Self by Tzachi Zamir. [REVIEW]Nick Riggle - 2015 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 1 (1):1.
    Recent work at the intersection of philosophy of action and aesthetics has unearthed rich territory. We are deepening our appreciation for and understanding of the role of pretense, imagination, and narrative (to name a few) in human action and moral psychology. Tzachi Zamir’s book investigates a relatively unexplored locus of overlap between philosophy of action and aesthetics via a multifaceted and conceptually rich study of the art, ethics, and moral psychology of acting — topics that have received scant philosophical attention...
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  26. "Theatrical Names and Reference".Michael Y. Bennett - 2015 - Palgrave Communications 1 (1).
    The relationship between “character” and an “actor” appears to be quite straightforward: an actor acts as/plays character [x]. But let us be more specific and reword this formulation: actor [y] acts as/plays Hamlet. Or – for the time of the play – actor [y] is Hamlet. And it is this last statement that is paradoxically utterly true and utterly false. It is in the name of a theatrical character that the tension between actor and character arises. Asking, for example, who (...)
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  27. Performance in Greek and Roman Theatre Ed. By George W. M. Harrison and Vayos Liapis.Rosa Andujar - 2014 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 108 (1):137-138.
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  28. El naixement de la tragèdia o hel·lenisme i pessimisme: Seguit de correspondència amb l'autor.Joan Ferrarons Llagostera & Mosè Cometta - 2014
    «El naixement de la tragèdia» és el primer llibre de Friedrich Nietzsche i constitueix una de les contribucions més importants a l’estudi de l’art tràgica. L’admiració de l’autor per Schopenhauer i Wagner impregna la seva crítica a la concepció imperant sobre els grecs, considerats fins aleshores un poble alegre i serè. Segons el filòsof, però, els grecs necessitaven la tragèdia per a superar el pessimisme i el nihilisme en què estaven sumits. En aquestes pàgines, la tragèdia neix entre l’ebrietat primigènia (...)
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  29. God No Longer Amuses.Ramona Fotiade - 2014 - Times Literary Supplement 5781:25-25.
    Book-review of the new critical edition of Benjamin Fondane's Théâtre complet and his philosophical writings, La Conscience malheureuse.
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  30. Two Loves I Have: Of Comfort and Despair in Shakespearean Genre.Claire Elizabeth McEachern - 2014 - British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (2):191-211.
    A consideration of the differences between Shakespearean comedy and tragedy in light of the historically particular inflection of dramatic irony in the English Reformation. The essay compares classical and humanist understandings of literary response and then proposes that we consider that response as a function of knowledge with respect to (and hence feelings about) a protagonist and his plight. The essay compares the structures of suspense in Sophocles’ and Seneca’s Oedipus plays, and then goes on to examine the ways in (...)
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  31. Some Ontology of Interactive Art.Dominic Preston - 2014 - Philosophy and Technology 27 (2):267-278.
    Lopes (2010) offers an account of computer art, which he argues is a new art form. Part of what makes computer art distinctive, according to Lopes, is its interactivity, a quality found in few non-computer artworks. Given the rise in prominence of such artworks, most notably videogames, they are surely worthy of philosophical inquiry. I believe their ontology and properties are particularly worthy of study, as an understanding of these will prove crucial to critical understanding and evaluation of the works (...)
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  32. The Paradox of Onstage Emotion.Michelle Saint - 2014 - British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (3):357-369.
    I develop a paradox regarding the emotional experiences of theatrical actors, which I call the ‘paradox of onstage emotion’. Many actors tell us that they experience genuine emotions while performing fictional plays: they grow angry, sad, joyful, etc., as befits their characters’ circumstances. Yet, they are not their characters and are not actually in those characters’ circumstances. Intuitively, it would seem those actors cannot have emotions befitting their characters’ circumstances rather than their own. Thus, we face a paradox. After setting (...)
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  33. Censorship as Catalyst for Artistic Innovation.Aili Bresnahan - 2013 - Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 23 (2):98-116.
    One kind of government-supported censorship of the arts targets not the expressive content of any particular artwork but instead seeks to suppress the activity of a group of people based on some feature of the group’s human identity such as race, gender or class. Using examples from the history of the development of black music in the United States that followed from the legal oppression of slavery and from evidence of changes in the Punjabi theatre in Pakistan following state-sanctioned suppressions (...)
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  34. Black Rain: The Apocalyptic Aesthetic and the Spectator's Ethical Challenge in (Israeli) Theater.Zahava Caspi - 2013 - Substance 42 (2):141-158.
    One feature that classical apocalyptic writings commonly share is their eschatological dimension, their "sense of an ending"1—the end of the world, of time, of humanity. But whereas traditional apocalyptic texts were for the most part utopian, their tales of destruction followed by narratives of redemption, modern secular apocalyptic literature is largely dystopian, ending in pure devastation. According to some scholars, the very arrival of modernity, beginning with Cartesian philosophy and its inherent doubt, was apocalyptic in nature. In the twentieth century, (...)
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  35. Installation Art and Performance: A Shared Ontology.Sherri Irvin - 2013 - In Christy Mag Uidhir (ed.), Art and Abstract Objects. Oxford University Press. pp. 242-262.
    This paper has three objectives. First, I argue that apprehending an installation artwork is similar to apprehending an artwork for performance: in each case, audiences must recognize a relationship between the performance or display one encounters and the parameters expressed in the underlying work. Second, I consider whether realizations are also artworks in their own right. I argue that, in both installation art and performance, a particular realization is sometimes an artwork in its own right (even as it realizes another (...)
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  36. Theatre and Philosophy The Art of Theater, by James R. Hamilton. Oxford: Blackwell, 2007, Xv + 226 Pp. ISBN 978‐1‐4051‐1353‐3 Hb £21.99 The Necessity of Theater, by Paul Woodruff. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008, Xiii + 257 Pp. ISBN 978‐0‐19‐533200‐1 Hb £17.99; ISBN 978‐0‐19‐539480‐1 Pb £10.99 The Drama of Ideas, by Martin Puchner. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010, Xii + 254 Pp. ISBN 978‐0‐19‐973032‐2 Hb £19.99 Philosophers and Thespians: Thinking Performance, by Freddie Rokem. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2010, Xi + 227 Pp. ISBN 978‐0‐8047‐6349‐3 Hb $60.00; ISBN 978‐0‐8047‐6350‐9 Pb $21.95. [REVIEW]Tom Stern - 2013 - European Journal of Philosophy 21 (1):158-167.
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  37. Philosophy and Theatre: An Introduction.Tom Stern - 2013 - Routledge.
    The relationship between philosophy and theatre is a central theme in the writings of Plato and Aristotle and of dramatists from Aristophanes to Stoppard. Where Plato argued that playwrights and actors should be banished from the ideal city for their suspect imitations of reality, Aristotle argued that theatre, particularly tragedy, was vital for stimulating our emotions and helping us to understanding ourselves. Despite this rich history the study of philosophy and theatre has been largely overlooked in contemporary philosophy. This is (...)
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  38. Review Article: Theatre and Philosophy. [REVIEW]Tom Stern - 2013 - European Journal of Philosophy 21 (1):158-167.
  39. Aristotle.Angela Curran - 2012 - In Alessandro Giovannelli (ed.), Aesthetics: The Key Thinkers. pp. 21-33.
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  40. Narrative, Emotion, and Insight. [REVIEW]Rafe Mcgregor - 2012 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (3):319-321.
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  41. Theatre Translation as Collaboration: A Case in Point in British Contemporary Drama.Andrea Peghinelli - 2012 - Journal for Communication and Culture 2 (1):20-30.
    Theatre translation is usually seen as a more elaborate dimension of literary translation because the text being translated is considered to be just one of the elements of theatre discourse. When translating a play, the translator should always adapt for performance the text he or she is recreating and be aware that a performer will deliver the lines. The translator, then, must take into account both the pragmatic and the semantic expressiveness of the word and remember that they are always (...)
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  42. The Aesthetic Response: The Reader in Macbeth.Ali Salami - 2012 - Folia Linguistica Et Litteraria 12.
    This article seeks to explore the different strategies the Bard uses in order to evoke sympathy in the reader for Macbeth who is so persistent in the path of evil. What strategy does Shakespeare use in order to provoke such a deep emotional response from his readers? By using paradoxes in the play, the Bard creates a world of illusion, fear and wild imagination. The paradoxical world in Macbeth startles us into marvel and fear, challenges our commonly held opinions, and (...)
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  43. Words, Space, and the Audience: The Theatrical Tension Between Empiricism and Rationalism.Michael Y. Bennett - 2012 - New York, NY, USA: Palgrave Macmillan.
    In this unique study, Michael Y. Bennett re-reads four influential modern plays alongside their contemporary debates between rationalism and empiricism to show how these monumental achievements were thoroughly a product of their time, but also universal in their epistemological quest to understand the world through a rational and/or empirical model. Bennett contends that these plays directly engage in their contemporary epistemological debates rather than through the lens of a specific philosophy. Besides producing new, insightful readings of heavily-studied plays, the interdisciplinary (...)
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  44. Reading Drama.Tzachi Zamir - 2012 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (2):179-192.
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  45. Convention, Audience, and Narrative: Which Play is the Thing?Leslie A. Howe - 2011 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 38 (2):135-148.
    This paper argues against the conception of sport as theatre. Theatre and sport share the characteristic that play is set in a conventionally-defined hypothetical reality, but they differ fundamentally in the relative importance of audience and the narrative point of view. Both present potential for participants for development of selfhood through play and its personal possibilities. But sport is not essentially tied to audience as is theatre. Moreover, conceptualising sport as a form of theatre valorises the spectator’s narrative as normative (...)
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  46. Postspektakuläres Theater: Die Alterität der Aufführung Und Die Entgrenzung der Künste.André Eiermann - 2009 - Bielefeld: Transcript.
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  47. Tragedy and Reparation.Elisa Galgut - 2009 - In Pedro Alexis Tabensky (ed.), The Positive Function of Evil. Palgrave-Macmillan.
    The Kleinian psychoanalyst Hanna Segal argues for the reparative nature of art, and especially of the genre of classical tragedy. According to Kleinian theory, healthy psychological development requires that early infantile aggressive and destructive emotions are worked through; such “working through” is necessary for the development of conscience, for feelings of empathy, as well as for cognitive development. It is also a necessary condition for creative activity. Segal examines the roots of the impulse to create by looking specifically at the (...)
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  48. Theatrical Performances and the Works Performed.Sherri Irvin - 2009 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 43 (3):pp. 37-50.
    I consider James Hamilton’s discussion of what I term the complete autonomy thesis, according to which no theatrical performance is a performance of some other work. While agreeing with Hamilton that theatrical performances are often artworks in their own right and that theatrical performance is not a derivative or subsidiary art form, I argue that the complete autonomy thesis overshoots the evidence. Some theatrical performances are autonomous, but many belong to an established tradition of close adherence to the texts of (...)
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  49. Science on Stage: Amusing Physics and Scientific Wonder at the Nineteenth-Century French Theatre.Sofie Lachapelle - 2009 - History of Science 47 (3):297-315.
  50. Performing the Middle Ages From 'Beowulf' to 'Othello'. [REVIEW]Ellen Mackay - 2009 - The Medieval Review 12.
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