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Summary What makes an explanatory hypothesis, or a theory, a good one? How do scientists decide the explanatory merits of alternative research programs, each appearing equally able to account for known facts? How, more generally, does scientific theory change proceed? For instance, are traits of objectivity, and more specific theoretical virtues such as "empirical adequacy," "logical consistency," "simplicity," "fruitfulness," and "robustness," etc. the same in all scientific fields, and do they always or regularly provide the same balance of judgment? Or do the differing objects and methods of the natural vis-a-vis the social sciences lead them to assess the merits of research programs against different theory virtues? Some of these questions have been highly debated extending back to the 2nd-half of the twentieth century, when the weighing of various theory virtues ("confirmation holism") was proposed as an inevitable implication of the  logical underdetermination of theories by the facts which they purport to explain ("the underdetermination problem").These are only some of the questions that working scientists often face, and that philosophers of science have discussed along with further entanglements of science and values. 
Key works The Aim and Structure of Physical Theory, Klein 1954 is still often read for his holistic account of theory confirmation and change in physics. When challenges began to accrue to logical empiricism in the 1950's and after, both Thomas Kuhn (1962) and W.V.O. Quine (with J.S. Ullian (1978)) explicitly discussed theory virtues, or "cognitive values," informed by their different understandings of the implications of confirmation holism. Primarily, discussion of theoretical virtues is concerned with assessment and selection of theories on the basis of scientific evidence, but objectivity, value judgment, and theory choice, Kuhn 1981” is a fascinating short entry into questions that made his The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, Kuhn 1962 so controversial. Imre Lakatos (1970) offered a moderately historicist alternative to the famous Popper-Kuhn debate about theory change, an alternative claiming that scientific theories are not best treated as timeless hypotheses, but rather as ongoing "research programmes" that reveal themselves as progressive or degenerative only over time, by their track-record of problem-solving. Lakatos therefore drew further attention to diachronic theory virtues, as more recently did Ernest McMullin, in "The Virtues of a Good Theory" (2009). But other philosophers such as Bas van Fraassen (1980) favor the synchronic theory virtues of "empirical adequacy" and "logical coherence") as the only one's that are genuine epistemic, or truth-indicative. While Lakatos and Larry Laudan (2004) still defended a sharp distinction between epistemic and social values, concerns with theory "virtues" and cognitive "values" also highlight broader questions of entanglements of science and values. These debates become a test-case for Richard Rudner's (1953) claim that the scientist qua scientist makes value judgments. Recent work challenging the cognitive/non-cognitive value distinction and an associated value-free account of scientific objectivity include the work of numerous feminist philosophers of science, including Helen Longino (1995) and Kristen Intemann (2005). Longino challenges both sides of that assumed dichotomy, arguing negatively that the traditional theory virtues cannot always be considered purely cognitive, and positively that social values often play a healthy or supportive (and not merely an objectivity-undermining) role in scientific practice. "The Value of Cognitive Values" Douglas 2013 and other works provide alternative taxonomies of the theory virtues, connecting them with concerns about scientific objectivity, on the one hand, and with broader concerns about the proper role of different kinds of values in decision-making with respect to science/technology policy, on the other. 
Introductions Douglas, Heather. 2014. "The Value of Cognitive Values," Philosophy of Science 80.5 (2014): 796–806. Intemann, Kristen. 2005. "Feminism, Underdetermination, and Values in Science," Philosophy of Science, 67(5), 1001–1012.

Levi, Isaac. 1995. "Cognitive Value and the Advancement of Science,"  Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 55(3), 619-627. 

Machamer, Peter. and Wolters, Gareon. 2004. "Introduction." In Machamer and Wolters (eds.) Science, Values, and Objectivity. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press.

McMullin, Ernest. 2009. "The Virtues of a Good Theory." In Curd, Martin and Psillos, Stathis. (eds.) The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Science. Routledge, London, 498-508. 

Schindler, Samuel. 2020. "Theoretical Virtues in Science," Oxford Bibliographies.

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  1. Theoretical Virtues of Cognitive Extension.Juraj Hvorecky & Marcin Miłkowski - 2024 - In Paulo Alexandre E. Castro (ed.), Challenges of the Technological Mind: Between Philosophy and Technology. Cham: Springer. pp. 103-119.
    This chapter argues that the extended mind approach to cognition can be distinguished from its alternatives, such as embedded cognition and distributed cognition, not only in terms of metaphysics, but also in terms of epistemology. In other words, it cannot be understood in terms of a mere verbal redefinition of cognitive processing. This is because the extended mind approach differs in its theoretical virtues compared to competing approaches to cognition. The extended mind approach is thus evaluated in terms of its (...)
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  2. Aesthetic Feelings in Scientific Reasoning.M. Miyata-Sturm - 2024 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy (XLIII/1):5-27.
    Scientists regularly invoke broadly aesthetic properties like elegance and simplicity when evaluating theories, but why should we expect aesthetic pleasure to signal an epistemic good? I argue that aesthetic judgements in science are best understood as a special case of affective cognition, and that the feelings on which these judgements are based are the upshots of metacognitive monitoring of the quality of our engagement with theory and evidence. Finding a theory beautiful fallibly signals that it fits well with our background (...)
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  3. Virtuously Circular. Theoretical Virtues in Reflective Equilibrium.Andreas Freivogel - 2023 - Dissertation, University of Bern
  4. The Theoretical Virtues of Theism.Joshua R. Sijuwade - 2023 - Philosophies 8 (6):1-41.
    In this article, I seek to assess the extent to which a ‘trope-theoretic’ version of Theism is a better theory than that of a theory of Atheism, as posited by Graham Oppy. This end will be achieved by utilising the systemisation of the theoretical virtues proposed by Michael Keas (as further modified by an application of the work of Jonathan Schaffer), the notion of a trope, introduced by D.C. Williams, and an aspect, proposed by Donald L.M. Baxter, which will establish (...)
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  5. Center Indifference and Skepticism.David Builes - forthcoming - Noûs.
    Many philosophers have been attracted to a restricted version of the principle of indifference in the case of self-locating belief. Roughly speaking, this principle states that, within any given possible world, one should be indifferent between different hypotheses concerning who one is within that possible world, so long as those hypotheses are compatible with one’s evidence. My first goal is to defend a more precise version of this principle. After responding to several existing criticisms of such a principle, I argue (...)
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  6. Can Moral Anti-Realists Theorize?Michael Zhao - forthcoming - Australasian Journal of Philosophy.
    Call "radical moral theorizing" the project of developing a moral theory that not only tries to conform to our existing moral intuitions, but also manifests various theoretical virtues: consistency, simplicity, explanatory depth, and so on. Many moral philosophers assume that radical moral theorizing does not require any particular metaethical commitments. In this paper, I argue against this assumption. The most natural justification for radical moral theorizing presupposes moral realism, broadly construed; in contrast, there may be no justification for radical moral (...)
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  7. Helen Longino'nun Bilimsel Nesnellik Anlayışı.Alper Bilgehan Yardımcı - 2021 - SRA Academic Publishing.
    Bilimsel faaliyetin ve bilimsel bilginin en temel özelliklerinden bir tanesi olarak karşımıza çıkan bilimsel nesnellik bilim felsefesi alanı içerisinde sıklıkla tartışılan bir konu olagelmiştir. Bu doğrultuda, bilimsel nesnelliğin temin edilmesine yönelik çeşitli görüşler ileri sürülmektedir. Genel olarak bilimsel nesnellik bilim insanlarının çalışmalarında olguları doğrudan yansıtması ya da bilim insanlarının çalışmalarını tarafsız bir bakış açısıyla tamamlaması olarak anlaşılmaktadır. Bu görüşlerin bilim felsefesi içerisindeki yansımaları sırasıyla olgulara bağlılık olarak nesnellik ve hiçbir yerden bakış olarak nesnellik isimleriyle olmuştur. Bu bakış açısı, kişisel çıkarların (...)
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  8. (Mis)Understanding scientific disagreement: Success versus pursuit-worthiness in theory choice.Eli I. Lichtenstein - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 85:166-175.
    Scientists often diverge widely when choosing between research programs. This can seem to be rooted in disagreements about which of several theories, competing to address shared questions or phenomena, is currently the most epistemically or explanatorily valuable—i.e. most successful. But many such cases are actually more directly rooted in differing judgments of pursuit-worthiness, concerning which theory will be best down the line, or which addresses the most significant data or questions. Using case studies from 16th-century astronomy and 20th-century geology and (...)
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  9. Instrumental Unification: Optical Apparatus in the Unification of Dispersion and Selective Absorption.Xiang Chen - 1999 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 30 (4):519-542.
  10. Anastasios Brenner. Raison scientifique et valeurs humaines. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 2011. Pp. viii+112, index. €22.00. [REVIEW]Teresa Castelão-Lawless - 2012 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 2 (1):182-185.
  11. Theoretical Terms and Inductive Inference.Keith Lehrer - forthcoming - American Philosophical Quarterly.
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  12. William C. Wimsatt.C. William - 1976 - In G. Gordon, Grover Maxwell & I. Savodnik (eds.), Consciousness and the Brain: A Scientific and Philosophical Inquiry. Plenum. pp. 205.
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  13. Estilos de investigación científica, modelos e insectos sociales.Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther - 2007 - In Edna Suárez Díaz (ed.), Variedad Infinita. Ciencia y representación. Un enfoque histórico y filosófico. UNAM and Editorial Limusa, Mexico.
  14. Evolving scientific epistemologies and the artifacts of empirical philosophy of science: A reply concerning mesosomes.Nicolas Rasmussen - 2001 - Biology and Philosophy 16 (5):627-652.
    In a 1993 paper, I argued that empirical treatments of the epistemologyused by scientists in experimental work are too abstract in practice tocounter relativist efforts to explain the outcome of scientificcontroversies by reference to sociological forces. This was because, atthe rarefied level at which the methodology of scientists is treated byphilosophers, multiple mutually inconsistent instantiations of theprinciples described by philosophers are employed by contestingscientists. These multiple construals change within a scientificcommunity over short time frames, and these different versions ofscientific methodology (...)
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Aesthetic Virtues in Science
  1. Moving Targets and Models of Nothing: A New Sense of Abstraction for Philosophy of Science.Michael T. Stuart & Anatolii Kozlov - 2024 - In Chiara Ambrosio & Julia Sánchez-Dorado (eds.), Abstraction in science and art: philosophical perspectives. New York, NY: Routledge.
    As Nelson Goodman highlighted, there are two main senses of “abstract” that can be found in discussions about abstract art. On the one hand, a representation is abstract if it leaves out certain features of its target. On the other hand, something can be abstract to the extent that it does not represent a concrete subject. The first sense of “abstract” is well-known in philosophy of science. For example, philosophers discuss mathematical models of physical, biological, and economic systems as being (...)
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  2. What is a Beautiful Experiment?Milena Ivanova - 2022 - Erkenntnis 88 (8):3419-3437.
    This article starts an engagement on the aesthetics of experiments and offers an account for analysing how aesthetics features in the design, evaluation and reception of experiments. I identify two dimensions of aesthetic evaluation of experiments: design and significance. When it comes to design, a number of qualities, such as simplicity, economy and aptness, are analysed and illustrated with the famous Meselson-Stahl experiment. Beautiful experiments are also regarded to make significant discoveries, but I argue against a narrow construal of experimental (...)
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  3. The future won’t be pretty: The nature and value of ugly, AI-designed experiments.Michael T. Stuart - 2023 - In Milena Ivanova & Alice Murphy (eds.), The Aesthetics of Scientific Experiments. New York, NY: Routledge.
    Can an ugly experiment be a good experiment? Philosophers have identified many beautiful experiments and explored ways in which their beauty might be connected to their epistemic value. In contrast, the present chapter seeks out (and celebrates) ugly experiments. Among the ugliest are those being designed by AI algorithms. Interestingly, in the contexts where such experiments tend to be deployed, low aesthetic value correlates with high epistemic value. In other words, ugly experiments can be good. Given this, we should conclude (...)
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  4. Theoretical Virtues: Do Scientists Think What Philosophers Think They Ought to Think?Samuel Schindler - 2022 - Philosophy of Science 89 (3):542-564.
    Theoretical virtues play an important role in the acceptance and belief of theories in science and philosophy. Philosophers have well-developed views on which virtues ought and ought not to influence one’s acceptance and belief. But what do scientists think? This paper presents the results of a quantitative study with scientists from the natural and social sciences and compares their views to those held by philosophers. Some of the more surprising results are: all three groups have a preference order regarding theoretical (...)
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  5. Naturalness and the Forward-Looking Justification of Scientific Principles.Enno Fischer - 2023 - Philosophy of Science 90 (5):1050 - 1059.
    It has been suggested that particle physics has reached the "dawn of the post-naturalness era." I provide an explanation of the current shift in particle physicists' attitude towards naturalness. I argue that the naturalness principle was perceived to be supported by the theories it has inspired. The potential coherence between major beyond the Standard Model (BSM) proposals and the naturalness principle led to an increasing degree of credibility of the principle among particle physicists. The absence of new physics at the (...)
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  6. Telling Stories in Science: Feyerabend and Thought Experiments.Michael T. Stuart - 2021 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 11 (1):262-281.
    The history of the philosophy of thought experiments has touched on the work of Kuhn, Popper, Duhem, Mach, Lakatos, and other big names of the 20th century, but so far, almost nothing has been written about Paul Feyerabend. His most influential work was Against Method, 8 chapters of which concern a case study of Galileo with a specific focus on Galileo’s thought experiments. In addition, the later Feyerabend was very interested in what might be called the epistemology of drama, including (...)
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  7. The Aesthetics of Science: Beauty, Imagination and Understanding.Milena Ivanova & Steven French (eds.) - 2020 - New York: Routledge.
    This volume builds on two recent developments in philosophy on the relationship between art and science: the notion of representation and the role of values in theory choice and the development of scientific theories. Its aim is to address questions regarding scientific creativity and imagination, the status of scientific performances--such as thought experiments and visual aids--and the role of aesthetic considerations in the context of discovery and justification of scientific theories. Several contributions focus on the concept of beauty as employed (...)
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  8. The Aesthetic and Literary Qualities of Scientific Thought Experiments.Alice Murphy - 2020 - In Milena Ivanova & Steven French (eds.), The Aesthetics of Science: Beauty, Imagination and Understanding. New York: Routledge.
    Is there a role for aesthetic judgements in science? One aspect of scientific practice, the use of thought experiments, has a clear aesthetic dimension. Thought experiments are creatively produced artefacts that are designed to engage the imagination. Comparisons have been made between scientific (and philosophical) thought experiments and other aesthetically appreciated objects. In particular, thought experiments are said to share qualities with literary fiction as they invite us to imagine a fictional scenario and often have a narrative form (Elgin 2014). (...)
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  9. Is Mathematics Unreasonably Effective?Daniel Waxman - 2021 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 99 (1):83-99.
    Many mathematicians, physicists, and philosophers have suggested that the fact that mathematics—an a priori discipline informed substantially by aesthetic considerations—can be applied to natural science is mysterious. This paper sharpens and responds to a challenge to this effect. I argue that the aesthetic considerations used to evaluate and motivate mathematics are much more closely connected with the physical world than one might presume, and (with reference to case-studies within Galois theory and probabilistic number theory) show that they are correlated with (...)
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  10. The Aesthetics of Theory Selection and the Logics of Art.Ian O’Loughlin & Kate McCallum - 2018 - Philosophy of Science (2):325-343.
    Philosophers of science discuss whether theory selection depends on aesthetic judgments or criteria, and whether these putatively aesthetic features are genuinely extra-epistemic. As examples, judgments involving criteria such as simplicity and symmetry are often cited. However, other theory selection criteria, such as fecundity, coherence, internal consistency, and fertility, more closely match those criteria used in art contexts and by scholars working in aesthetics. Paying closer attention to the way these criteria are used in art contexts allows us to understand some (...)
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  11. Systematizing the theoretical virtues.Michael N. Keas - 2017 - Synthese 1 (6):1-33.
    There are at least twelve major virtues of good theories: evidential accuracy, causal adequacy, explanatory depth, internal consistency, internal coherence, universal coherence, beauty, simplicity, unification, durability, fruitfulness, and applicability. These virtues are best classified into four classes: evidential, coherential, aesthetic, and diachronic. Each virtue class contains at least three virtues that sequentially follow a repeating pattern of progressive disclosure and expansion. Systematizing the theoretical virtues in this manner clarifies each virtue and suggests how they might have a coordinated and cumulative (...)
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  12. Teaching and learning guide for aesthetics of science.Milena Ivanova - 2017 - Philosophy Compass 12 (10):e12443.
    Scientists often use aesthetic values in the evaluation and choice of theories. Aesthetic values are not only regarded as leading to practically more useful theories but are often taken to stand in a special epistemic relation to the truth of a theory such that the aesthetic merit of a theory is evidence of its truth. This paper explores what aesthetic considerations influence scientists' reasoning, how such aesthetic values relate to the utility of a scientific theory, and how one can justify (...)
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  13. Aesthetic values in science.Milena Ivanova - 2017 - Philosophy Compass 12 (10):e12433.
    Scientists often use aesthetic values in the evaluation and choice of theories. Aesthetic values are not only regarded as leading to practically more useful theories but are often taken to stand in a special epistemic relation to the truth of a theory such that the aesthetic merit of a theory is evidence of its truth. This paper explores what aesthetic considerations influence scientists' reasoning, how such aesthetic values relate to the utility of a scientific theory, and how one can justify (...)
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  14. The Art of Science: Quine and the speculative reach of philosophy in natural science.Chalmers C. Clark - 1998 - Dialectica 52 (4):275-290.
    In this essay it is shown that the imaginative art of scientific theorizing – at its technical best – animates Quine's philosophy as importantly as the more Spartan norms honored in his present pantheon of virtues. By drawing a contrast between the standing of theories in philosophy and theories in science, it will be shown that the speculative reaches of philosophy, along with developments in semantic theory, now oblige an internal revision of Quine's stance against meaning as it was announced (...)
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  15. V—Aesthetics in Science: A Kantian Proposal.Angela Breitenbach - 2013 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 113 (1pt1):83-100.
    Can aesthetic judgements legitimately be linked to the success of scientific theories? I suggest that a satisfactory answer to this question should account for the persistent attraction that aesthetic considerations seem to have for scientists, while also explaining the apparent instability of the link between the beauty of a theory and its truth. I argue that two widespread tendencies in the literature, Pythagorean and subjectivist approaches, have difficulties meeting this twofold challenge. I propose a Kantian conception of aesthetic judgements as (...)
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  16. Beauty and Revolution in Science.James W. Mcallister - 1999 - Philosophical Quarterly 49 (194):125-128.
  17. Kepler, elliptical orbits, and celestial circularity: A study in the persistence of metaphysical commitment: Part I.J. Bruce Brackenridge - 1982 - Annals of Science 39 (2):117-143.
    The metaphysical commitment to the circle as the essential element in the analysis of celestial motion has long been recognized as the hallmark of classical astronomy. What has not always been clear, however, is that the circle continued to serve Kepler as a central element in his astronomy after the discovery of the elliptical orbit of Mars. Moreover, the circle also functioned for Kepler in geometry to select the basic polygons, in music to select the basic harmonies, and in astrology (...)
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  18. The Principle of Economy as an Evaluation Criterion of Theories.Styrman Avril - 2014 - la Nuova Critica 63:63-89.
    The principle of economy favours the theory which gives the most accurate predictions; of two equally accurate theories, economy favours the one which incorporates least metaphysics. The intention is to show that were metaphysical commitments of theories openly acknowledged and simplicity and other virtues generally accepted as judges in theory choice, the progress rate of science would likely become more optimal.
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  19. Meta-Metaphysics: On Metaphysical Equivalence, Primitiveness, and Theory Choice.Jiri Benovsky - 2016 - Springer.
    Metaphysical theories are beautiful. I mean it literally. At the end of this book, I defend the view that metaphysical theories possess aesthetic properties and that these play a crucial role when it comes to theory evaluation and theory choice. But this is the end of a long journey – a journey that is perhaps more important than the destination. Before we get there, the philosophical path I propose to follow starts with three discussions of metaphysical equivalence. I argue that (...)
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  20. Subjectivity and Emotion in Scientific Research.Jeff Kochan - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (3):354-362.
    A persistent puzzle for philosophers of science is the well-documented appeal made by scientists to their aesthetic emotions in the course of scientific research. Emotions are usually viewed as irremediably subjective, and thus of no epistemological interest. Yet, by denying an epistemic role for scientists’ emotional dispositions, philosophers find themselves in the awkward position of ignoring phenomena which scientists themselves often insist are of importance. This paper suggests a possible solution to this puzzle by challenging the wholesale identification of emotion (...)
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  21. Principles and the Development of Physical Theory: Case Studies.Robert Corby Hovis - 1994 - Dissertation, Cornell University
    Three separate articles make up the chapters of this dissertation. They were written with different aims and audiences in mind, but each deals in some way with one or more "principles" that have been invoked in argumentation and explanation in the physical sciences. The principles of concern are propositions which have an "aesthetic" or "foundational" or "philosophical" character and which are generally believed to be widely applicable or particularly powerful--for example, the Principle of Plenitude, the Principle of Mathematical Beauty, Occam's (...)
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  22. On Aesthetics in Science.Judith Wechsler - 1978 - MIT Press (MA).
  23. On Aesthetics in Science by Judith Wechsler. [REVIEW]Karen Reeds - 1979 - Isis 70:448-449.
  24. Virginia Woolf and the Discourse of Science: The Aesthetics of Astronomy. [REVIEW]Kathryn Neeley - 2005 - Isis 96:132-133.
  25. Fearful Symmetry: The Search for Beauty in Modern Physics by A. Zee. [REVIEW]James Mcallister - 2001 - Isis 92:130-131.
  26. Beautiful Evidence. [REVIEW]Laura Perini - 2007 - Isis 98:667-668.
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  27. The Aesthetics of Laboratory Inscription: Claude Bernard's Cahier Rouge.Atia Sattar - 2013 - Isis 104 (1):63-85.
    This essay explores the aesthetic sensibilities of the French physiologist Claude Bernard . In particular, it analyzes the Cahier Rouge , Bernard's acclaimed laboratory notebook. In this notebook, Bernard articulates the range of his experience as an experimental physiologist, juxtaposing without differentiation details of laboratory procedure and more personal queries, doubts, and reflections on experimentation, life, and art. Bernard's insights, it is argued, offer an aesthetic and phenomenological template for considering experimentation. His physiological point of view ranges from his own (...)
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  28. Galileo as a Critic of the Arts: Aesthetic Attitude and Scientific Thought.Erwin Panofsky - 1956 - Isis 47:3-15.
  29. The Elusive Synthesis: Aesthetics and Science by Alfred I. Tauber. [REVIEW]Nick Jardine - 1997 - Isis 88:747-748.
  30. Beauty and Revolution in Science by James W. McAllister. [REVIEW]Thomas Nickles - 1997 - Isis 88:746-747.
  31. Truth and Beauty: Aesthetics and Motivations in Science by S. Chandrasekhar. [REVIEW]David Devorkin - 1988 - Isis 79:128-129.
  32. Galileo Engineer: Art and Modern Science.Wolfgang Lefèvre - 2001 - Science in Context 14 (s1):11-27.
    in spite of koyré's conclusions, there are sufficient reasons to claim that galileo, and with him the beginnings of classical mechanics in early modern times, was closely related to practical mechanics. it is, however, not completely clear how, and to what extent, practitioners and engineers could have had a part in shaping the modern sciences. by comparing the beginnings of modern dynamics with the beginnings of statics in antiquity, and in particular with archimedes — whose rediscovery in the sixteenth century (...)
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  33. Aesthetic Factors in Natural Science.Nicholas Rescher - 1989 - Upa.
    This collection of essays originated from an interdisciplinary conference held at the University of Pittsburgh. Contents: Aesthetic Factors in Natural Science, by Nicholas Rescher; Three Arguments against Simplicity, by Kristin Shrader-Frechette; Simplicity and the Aesthetics of Explanation, by Joseph C. Pitt; Simplicity as an Epistemic Virtue: The View from the Neuronal Level, by Paul M. Churchland; Taming a Regulative Principle: From Kant to Schlick, by Matti Sintonen; Simplicity and Distinctness: The Limits of Referential Semantics, by Ulrich Majer; The Aesthetics of (...)
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  34. The Poetic Structure of the World: Copernicus and Kepler.Fernand Hallyn - 1990 - Zone Books.
    The Poetic Structure of the World is a major reconsideration of a crucial turningpoint in Western thought and culture: the heliocentric revolution of Copernicus and Kepler. FernandHallyn treats the work of these two figures not simply in terms of the history of science orastronomy, but as events embedded in a wider field of images, symbols, texts, and practices. Thesenew representations of the universe, he insists, cannot be explained by recourse to explanations of"genius" or "intuition."Instead, Hallyn investigates the problem of how (...)
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  35. Beauty in science: a new model of the role of aesthetic evaluations in science. [REVIEW]Ulianov Montano - 2013 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 3 (2):133-156.
    In Beauty and Revolution in Science, James McAllister advances a rationalistic picture of science in which scientific progress is explained in terms of aesthetic evaluations of scientific theories. Here I present a new model of aesthetic evaluations by revising McAllister’s core idea of the aesthetic induction. I point out that the aesthetic induction suffers from anomalies and theoretical inconsistencies and propose a model free from such problems. The new model is based, on the one hand, on McAllister’s original model and (...)
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  36. Cognitive and Aesthetic Values in Artistic Work and Scientific Work.Grzegorz Białkowski & Helena Białkowska - 1978 - Dialectics and Humanism 5 (2):39-52.
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