This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
About this topic
Summary Theories of free will focus on two basic questions: its possibility and its nature. The possibility question is almost always concerned principally with whether freedom is compatible with causal determinism, as well as with closely related (putative) threats like God's foreknowledge. Philosophers may be either compatibilists or incompatibilists with regard to the relation between freedom and determinism. Of course philosophers are particularly concerned with whether free will is actual. Questions of the nature of free will are usually addressed in conjunction with the compatibility question: philosophers develop accounts of free will in order to show that it is or is not compatible with causal determinism. The typology of these accounts appears under the sibling category "topics in free will".
Key works Contemporary theorists of free will divide into compatibilists, incompatibilists and impossibilists in the main. The most important contemporary compatibilist is probably John Martin Fischer (Fischer & Ravizza 1998) though real self views are increasingly influential (Arpaly 2002Scanlon 2008). Incompatibilists traditionally divide into hard determinists, who hold that free will is incompatible with determinism and determinism is true and libertarians. Libertarians, in turn, divide into agent-causal theorists (e.g. O'Connor 2000) and event-causal theorists (e.g. Kane 1996). Impossibilism has never been popular but seems to be growing slightly (see for instance Strawson 1994). Derk Pereboom's near-impossibilism is also influential (Pereboom 2001). 
Introductions O'Connor & Franklin 2018;McKenna 2008; Clarke & Capes ms; Levy & McKenna 2009
Related categories

4462 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 4462
Material to categorize
  1. The Problem of Determinism - Freedom as Self-Determination.Dieter Wandschneider - 2010 - Psychotherapie Forum 18:100-107.
    There are arguments for determinism. Admittedly, this is opposed by the fact of everyday experience of autonomy. In the following, it is argued for the compatibility of determinism and autonomy. Taking up considerations of Donald MacKay, a fatalistic attitude can be refuted as false. Repeatedly, attempts have been made to defend the possibility of autonomy with reference to quantum physical indeterminacy. But its statistical randomness clearly misses the meaning of autonomy. What is decisive, on the other hand, is the possibility (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Determinismus der Natur und Freiheit des Geistes. Die Rezeption Fichtes in Frankreich und die Ursprünge des französischen Spiritualismus, in Helmut Girndt (a cura di), „Natur“ in der Transzendentalphilosophie. Eine Tagung zum Gedenken an Reinhard Lauth, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, 2015, s. 373-406. [ISBN: 978-3-428-14535-5].Tommaso Valentini - 2015 - In Helmut Girndt (ed.), «Begriff und Konkretion. Beiträge zur Gegenwart der klassischen deutschen Philosphie». Berlino, Germania: pp. 373-406.
    In diesem Beitrag betrachte ich die Rezeption des Denkens von J.G. Fichte bei zwei Philosophen, die als die »Begründer des französischen Spiritualismus« gesehen werden können. Es geht um François-Pierre Maine de Biran (Bergerac 1766 - Paris 1824) und Joseph-Luis-Jules Lequier (Quintin 1814 - Saint-Briec 1862). Nach einer kurzen Gesamtdarstellung der Schwerpunkte beider beschäftige ich mich - in zwei verschieden Teilen - mit der historischen und philologischen Frage, was die französischen Philosophen wirklich von den Werken Fichtes gekannt beziehungsweise verstanden haben. Beide (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Free Will: Real or Illusion - A Debate.Gregg D. Caruso, Christian List & Cory J. Clark - 2020 - The Philosopher 108 (1).
    Debate on free will with Christian List, Gregg Caruso, and Cory Clark. The exchange is focused on Christian List's book Why Free Will Is Real.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. To Be Able to, or to Be Able Not To? That is the Question. A Problem for the Transcendental Argument for Freedom.Nadine Elzein & Tuomas K. Pernu - 2019 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 15 (2):13-32.
    A type of transcendental argument for libertarian free will maintains that if acting freely requires the availability of alternative possibilities, and determinism holds, then one is not justified in asserting that there is no free will. More precisely: if an agent A is to be justified in asserting a proposition P (e.g. "there is no free will"), then A must also be able to assert not-P. Thus, if A is unable to assert not-P, due to determinism, then A is not (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Why Free Will is Real.Christian List - 2019 - Cambridge, MA, USA: Harvard University Press.
    Philosophers have argued about the nature and the very existence of free will for centuries. Today, many scientists and scientifically minded commentators are skeptical that it exists, especially when it is understood to require the ability to choose between alternative possibilities. If the laws of physics govern everything that happens, they argue, then how can our choices be free? Believers in free will must be misled by habit, sentiment, or religious doctrine. Why Free Will Is Real defies scientific orthodoxy and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  6. Hegel.Christopher Yeomans - 2017 - In Kevin Timpe (ed.), Routledge Companion to Free Will. New York, NY, USA: Routledge. pp. 356-363.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Were You a Zygote?G. E. M. Anscombe - 1984 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 18:111-115.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  8. The Cards That Are Dealt You.John Martin Fischer - 2005 - The Journal of Ethics 10 (1-2):107-129.
    Various philosophers have argued that in order to be morally responsible, we need to be the "ultimate sources'' of our choices and behavior. Although there are different versions of this sort of argument, I identify a "picture'' that lies behind them, and I contend that this picture is misleading. Joel Feinberg helpfully suggested that we scale down what might initially be thought to be legitimate demands on "self-creation,'' rather than jettison the idea that we are truly and robustly responsible. I (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  9. I Involutional Determinism.Mark Bernstein - 1988 - The Monist 71 (3):358-364.
    One tolerably clear statement of Determinism has it that all events are caused. Expanded upon, this thesis has been taken as the claim that the existence of any event E1, has a set of events, E2 … En which antedate E1, and which are causally sufficient for the occurrence of E1. That is, given the occurrence of E2 … En, E1 is causally necessary. I would hardly wish to claim that this is the only plausible statement of the doctrine of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Freedom, Gratitude, and Resentment: Olivi and Strawson.Daniel Coren - 2019 - Res Philosophica 96 (3):1-21.
    I argue that by attending to a distinction among perspectives on the root causes of our reactive attitudes, we can better understand the bases and limitations of long-standing debates about free will and moral responsibility. I characterize this distinction as “objectivism vs. subjectivism.” I bring out this distinction by, first, scrutinizing an especially sharp divergence between Peter Strawson and Peter John Olivi: for Olivi, our ordinary human attitudes make it obvious that we have free will, and our attitudes would be (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. A Metaphysics For Freedom, by Steward Helen: Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012, Pp. Xii + 267, £36.00. [REVIEW]Antony Eagle - 2013 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 91 (4):833-833.
  12. Agent-Causal Libertarianism, Statistical Neural Laws and Wild Coincidences.Jason Runyan - 2017 - Synthese 195 (10):4563-4580.
    Agent-causal libertarians maintain we are irreducible agents who, by acting, settle matters that aren’t already settled. This implies that the neural matters underlying the exercise of our agency don’t conform to deterministic laws, but it does not appear to exclude the possibility that they conform to statistical laws. However, Pereboom (Noûs 29:21–45, 1995; Living without free will, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2001; in: Nadelhoffer (ed) The future of punishment, Oxford University Press, New York, 2013) has argued that, if these neural (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Human Communion and Difference in Gregory of Nyssa: From Trinitarian Theology to the Philosophy of Human Person and Free Decision.Francisco Bastitta-Harriet - 2011 - In Volker H. Drecoll & Margitta Berghaus (eds.), Gregory of Nyssa: The Minor Treatises on Trinitarian Theology and Apollinarism (Vigiliae Christianae Supplements, 106). Leiden, Netherlands: pp. 337-349.
    In the Philosophical Anthropology of Gregory of Nyssa, inspired by his Trinitarian Theology, the new concept of hypostasis as a unique self implies for the first time the irreducibility of human person to the universal. Moreover, Gregory manages to account for both a deep communion of life and nature among all men and a clear distinction between persons, in a truly harmonious dynamism of the physical and the hypostatic. This union and distinction will also inspire his original conception of proaíresis, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. El yo y la libertad: raíces patrísticas de la antropología renacentista y moderna.Francisco Bastitta-Harriet - 2012 - RIIM 56:35-56.
    Humanists and philosophers in the Quattrocento find inspiration for their treatises on human dignity not only in Classical Antiquity, but also in the works of the Church Fathers. The present paper examines the influence of the latter on the theories of freedom at the dawn of Modernity, especially regarding the Patristic conception of human self as person or hypostasis, whose free decision is considered inviolable, creative and irreducible to its own nature or essence.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Does God ‘Follow’ Human Decision? An Interpretation of a Passage From Gregory of Nyssa’s De Vita Moysis (II 86).Francisco Bastitta-Harriet - 2013 - Studia Patristica 67 (15):101-112.
    The peculiar emphases of Gregory of Nyssa’s thought earned him all kinds of charges, in his own lifetime and onwards: among others, that he falls into Tritheism, Modalism, Synergism, Pelagianism or Semi-Pelagianism. The purpose of this paper is to interpret one of these theoretical audacities. It can be found in a passage from his late treatise De vita Moysis (II 86), where he refers to the evils suffered by the Egyptians in the book of Exodus, and he attributes their cause (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. An Introduction to Real Possibilities, Indeterminism, and Free Will: Three Contingencies of the Debate.Thomas Müller, Antje Rumberg & Verena Wagner - 2019 - Synthese 196 (1):1-10.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Manipulation: Theory and Practice.Christian Coons & Michael Weber (eds.) - 2014 - Oup Usa.
    A great deal of scholarly attention has been paid to coercion. Less attention has been paid to what might be a more pervasive form of influence: manipulation. The essays in this volume address this relative imbalance by focusing on manipulation, examining its nature, moral status, and its significance in personal and social life.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  18. Colloquium 5: The Αristotelian Origins of Stoic Determinism.Priscilla Sakezles - 2009 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 24 (1):163-196.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Taking Responsibility for Ourselves: A Kierkegaardian Account of the Freedom-Relevant Conditions Necessary for the Cultivation of Character.Paul E. Carron - 2011 - Dissertation, Baylor University
    What are the freedom-relevant conditions necessary for someone to be a morally responsible person? I examine several key authors beginning with Harry Frankfurt that have contributed to this debate in recent years, and then look back to the writings or Søren Kierkegaard to provide a solution to the debate. In this project I investigate the claims of semi-compatibilism and argue that while its proponents have identified a fundamental question concerning free will and moral responsibility—namely, that the agential properties necessary for (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Causation and Free Will, by Carolina Sartorio: Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016, Pp. Viii + 188, £35. [REVIEW]Helen Beebee - 2018 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 96 (1):207-208.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Da filosofia antiga à filosofia contemporânea da acção.Ricardo Santos - 2011 - In Sofia Miguens & Susana Cadilha (eds.), Acção e Ética: Conversas sobre racionalidade prática. Lisboa: Edições Colibri. pp. 143-162.
    In this chapter, the author presents and develops his views on the philosophy of action. One main theme is the problem of acrasia: how is it possible that a person sometimes acts freely and intentionally against his own better judgement? The author criticizes Donald Davidson’s solution to this problem for being unrealistic and exaggerating the rationality of the agent. He also presents his original way of reading Aristotle’s most famous text on this subject, in Ethica Nicomachea VII 3. The role (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Between Contumacy and Obsequiousness.Daniel Kapust - 2009 - European Journal of Political Theory 8 (3):293-311.
    This article explores Tacitus’ negotiation of the dilemmas of writing due to the emergence of the Principate and the displacement of Republican politics. These developments constrained the orator and the historian, and required a distinctive approach to the writing of history. I argue that Tacitus develops a conception of the historian’s task that centers on the historian’s moral freedom and educative role in the Principate. This freedom is evident in Tacitus’ depiction of good and bad principes, as well as his (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Causes, Laws, and Free Will.Storrs McCall - 2016 - Philosophical Quarterly 66 (265):870-871.
  24. Relational Creativity and the Symmetry of Freedom and Nature.Philip Michael Rose - 2005 - Cosmos and History : The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 1 (1):3-16.
    One of the more important and persistent of problems in speculative philosophy is reconciling the relation between freedom and nature. This is often referred to as the problem of freedom and determinism, but this way of formulating the problem assumes, uncritically, that nature is and must necessarily be a purely deterministic framework. As I hope to show, the so-called problem of freedom and determinism lies precisely in this deterministic assumption. By reorienting the question in terms of the relation between freedom (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Morality and Freedom.Alan Carter - 2003 - Philosophical Quarterly 53 (211):161 - 180.
    What might be termed 'the problem of morality' concerns how freedom-restricting principles may be justified, given that we value our freedom. Perhaps an answer can be found in freedom itself. For if the most obvious reason for rejecting moral demands is that they invade one's personal freedom, then the price of freedom from invasive demands that others would otherwise make may well require everyone accepting freedom in general, say, as a value that provides sufficient reason for adhering to principles that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Irreducible Freedom in Nature.Jennifer Campbell - 2014 - Philosophy 89 (2):301-323.
    I provide a novel response to scepticism concerning freedom and moral responsibility. This involves my extension to freedom of John McDowell's liberal natural approach to ethics and epistemology. I trace the source of the sceptical problem to an overly restrictive, brute conception of nature, where reality is equated with what figures, directly or indirectly, in natural scientific explanation. I challenge the all encompassing explanatory pretensions of restrictive naturalism, advocating a re-conception of nature such that it already incorporates reasons. This allows (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Freedom and Experience: Self-Determination Without Illusions.Magill Kevin - 1997 - London: author open access, originally MacMillan.
    Most of us take it for granted that we are free agents: that we can sometimes act so as to shape our own lives and those of others, that we have choices about how to do so and that we are responsible for what we do. But are we really justified in believing this? For centuries philosophers have argued about whether free will and moral responsibility are compatible with determinism or natural causation, and they seem no closer to agreeing about (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  28. The Obligation Dilemma.Ishtiyaque Haji - 2017 - The Journal of Ethics 21 (1):37-61.
    I motivate a dilemma to show that nothing can be obligatory for anyone regardless of whether determinism or indeterminism is true. The deterministic horn, to which prime attention is directed, exploits the thesis that obligation requires freedom to do otherwise. Since determinism precludes such freedom, it precludes obligation too. The indeterministic horn allows for freedom to do otherwise but assumes the burden of addressing whether indeterministically caused choices or actions are too much of a matter of luck to be obligatory (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  29. Ii Blasco Disputatio: Does Free Will Require Alternative Possibilities? Blasco Disputatio is a Yearly Workshop Designed to Promote the Discussion on Topics in Epistemology, Metaphysics, the Philosophy of Mind and the Philosophy of Language. Each Edition of This Workshop Focuses on a Particular Issue to Be Disputed by Two Invited Speakers That Will Defend Divergent, If Not Opposing, Views. A Call for Papers Will Be Made for Contributions That Will Explore Further Aspects of the Topic. The 2016 Edition of the Blasco Disputatio Will Be Mainly Focused on the Question of Whether Free Will Requires Alternative Possibilities and on the Role of Causation in a Proper Understanding of Freedom, but It is Open to Discussing Any Related Issues in Metaphysics and the Philosophy of Action. The Invited Papers, Together with a Selection of the Submitted Papers, Will Appear on a Special Issue in the Journal Disputatio. [REVIEW] Admin - 2015 - Disputatio.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Three Philosophical Dialogues: On Truth, on Freedom of Choice, on the Fall of the Devil.Thomas Anselm & Williams - 2002 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    In these three dialogues, renowned for their dialectical structure and linguistic precision, Anselm sets out his classic account of the relationship between freedom and sin--its linchpin his definition of freedom of choice as the power to preserve rectitude of will for its own sake. In doing so, Anselm explores the fascinating implications for God, human beings, and angels of his conclusion that freedom of choice neither is nor entails the power to sin. In addition to an Introduction, notes, and a (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31. Rossignol: An Edition And Translation. [REVIEW]Nadia Margolis - 1980 - Speculum 56 (1):94-96.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Freewill and Determinism.Freedom of Choice Affirmed.The Problem of Freedom and Determinism.R. L. Franklin, Corliss Lamont & Edward D'angelo - 1970 - Journal of Philosophy 67 (7):208-220.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. In Defence of Free Will, with Other Philosophical Essays.M. C. Bradley - 1968 - Journal of Philosophy 65 (11):341-350.
  34. Determinism.E. T. Rakitzis - 1975 - Giornale di Metafisica 30:401-403.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Time and Free Will: An Essay on the Immediate Data of Consciousness. Henri Bergson, F. L. Pogson.A. E. Taylor - 1911 - International Journal of Ethics 21 (3):350-352.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Against Dogma and Free Will, and for Weismannism.H. Croft Hiller.D. G. Ritchie - 1895 - International Journal of Ethics 5 (3):399-400.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. THOMAS, GEORGE F. Spirit and its Freedom. [REVIEW]Albert Salomon - 1939 - Journal of Social Philosophy and Jurisprudence 5:82.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. British Philosophy in the Mid-Century. Johnstone - 1958 - Philosophy of Science 25 (4):305-307.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. An Inquiry Into the Freedom of Decision. Harald Ofstad.Leon J. Goldstein - 1964 - Philosophy of Science 31 (2):189-190.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Locke on Active Power and the Obscure Idea of Active Power From Bodies.R. M. Mattern - 1980 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 11 (1):39.
  41. Philosophers in Spite of Themselves.Douglas N. Morgan - 1951 - Ethics 62:55.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Free and Equal: A Philosphical Examination of Political Values.David R. Mapel - 1989 - Ethics 100 (1):184-185.
  43. Determination and Freewill. Anthony Collins’ a Philosophical Inquiry Concerning Human Liberty. [REVIEW]J. B. V. - 1977 - Review of Metaphysics 30 (4):771-772.
    Although this book contains a facsimile of the second London edition of Collins’ Inquiry, the main author is O’Higgins, for his Introduction and Notes seem more important than the 18th-century pamphlet. Collins was a country squire, friend of John Locke, an Anglican Deist, and a convinced determinist in his explanation of volition. His education was spotty: Eton, a year at Cambridge and unfinished studies in law. A general study of Collins’ life and writings was published by O’Higgins in 1970, yet (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Freedom, Responsibility and God. [REVIEW]A. D. H. - 1976 - Review of Metaphysics 30 (1):144-145.
    This volume, included in the recently established Library of Philosophy and Religion, devotes its primary attention to recent discussion within analytic philosophy concerning the challenge which determinism offers to the concept of freedom and, thereby, to Christian theism. Although the author does not argue that determinism has been established, he does conclude that it is an empirical proposal and may well represent the situation. He is prepared to fall back upon a libertarianism if necessary, but considers determinism at face value (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Equality, Liberty, and Perfectionism. [REVIEW]L. S. D. - 1980 - Review of Metaphysics 34 (2):378-380.
    Vinit Haksar has written a fairly lengthy book in order to establish a rather simple point : that it is impossible to arrive at an adequate account of justice without judging the objective merit of alternative ways of life. The main target of his argument is John Rawls, whose influential A Theory of Justice purports to sever considerations of justice from those of the human good in precisely this way. Haksar’s argument is also intended, however, as a criticism of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. The Cosmology of Freedom. [REVIEW]F. D. D. - 1975 - Review of Metaphysics 28 (4):762-762.
    In this "essay in systematic philosophy," Neville takes on an ambitious project: the integration of the personal and social dimensions of freedom in terms of an "axiological cosmology." The introductory chapters which sketch this cosmology and value theory owe much to a careful and critical reading of Whitehead and Plato. The succeeding discussion of personal freedom culminates in the pivotal notion of creativity: "Personal freedom is creative activity in the environment of the given world." Consequently, freedom can be limited neither (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Tensions of Order and Freedom: Catholic Political Thought, 1789-1848. [REVIEW]Mark Wegierski - 1995 - Review of Metaphysics 48 (4):913-914.
    Menczer was a cultivated man, of letters of a type which has now virtually become extinct, who never held an academic posting, but nevertheless could write intellectual history with a degree of insight. This work, originally published in 1952, pulls no punches in its unabashed Catholicism, and would today be seen by many as a work of unreconstructed, very traditionalist theology, rather than of political thought.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Science in a Free Society. [REVIEW]H. S. R. - 1981 - Review of Metaphysics 35 (2):383-385.
    Science in a Free Society is the sequel to Feyerabend's earlier iconoclastic, provocative book, Against Method. As he states in the preface: "Like the earlier book this volume has one aim: to remove obstacles intellectuals and specialists create for traditions different from their own and to prepare the removal of the specialists themselves from the life centers of society". The book is divided into three parts: Part 1 resumes the argument presented in Against Method; part 2 extends the implications of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Natural Philosophy Through the Eighteenth Century and Allied Topics. [REVIEW]A. W. W. - 1975 - Review of Metaphysics 29 (2):340-341.
    The essays which comprise this collection made their first appearance in 1948 to celebrate the one hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the British science journal, The Philosophical Magazine, which initially published many monographs in which distinguished scientific discoveries were announced. The present edition is a reprint of the supplement to the regular issue of 1948 and is now put out in book form to be more available for students of the history of science. The "natural philosophy" in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Anagogical Vision and Comedic Form in Flannery O'Connor: The Reasonable Use of the Unreasonable.Denise T. Askin - 2004 - Renascence 57 (1):47-62.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 4462