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  1. Two (Lay) Dogmas on Externalities.Vaughn Bryan Baltzly - forthcoming - Public Choice.
    I argue that much current thinking on externalities—at least among “lay political economists” (but even, on occasion, among professional economists)—is saddled with two analytical errors. The first is what I call coextensivism: the conflation of public goods and externalities. The second error is what I call externality profligacy: the conflation of economic and “social” externalities. The principal dangers presented by these two “dogmas on externalities” are that, while in their grips, we are under-disposed to seek negotiated, market-based solutions (of a (...)
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  2. Identity Economics by Akerlof and Kranton [Review].John Davis - forthcoming - Economics and Philosophy.
  3. Triangulation: A Retroduction Approach in the Reorientation of Social Science Research for Central Bank Policy in Sierra Leone.Emerson Abraham Jackson - forthcoming - African Journal of Economic and Management Studies 9 (2).
    The article addresses critical discourses pertaining to triangulation methodology as a step forward in dealing with policy formulation, particularly at the Bank of Sierra Leone. Alternative prescriptive measure like critical discourse analysis have been proposed as a means to the cutting head development in bridging the gap between orthodox and heterodox views of economic sciences investigations.
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  4. The Covid-19 Pandemic: A Public Choice View.Panagiotis Karadimas - 2023 - Springer.
    This monograph evaluates public policy responses to the Covid-19 pandemic through a public choice lens. The book compares two prominent, albeit mutually exclusive, theories in social sciences—public interest theory and public choice theory—and explores how their predictions perform within the framework of the Covid-19 pandemic. The chapters present different pandemic policies alongside empirical data in order to draw conclusions about their efficacy, and, in turn, draw conclusions about the veracity of each theory. By the end of the volume, the reader (...)
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  5. Determinism, free will, and the Austrian School of Economics.Dawid Megger - 2021 - Journal of Economic Methodology 28 (3):304-321.
    In this paper I analyse the problem of free will and determinism as it pertains to the Austrian School of Economics. I demonstrate that despite the fact they subscribe to the concept of causality,...
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  6. Two Strands of Field Experiments in Economics: A Historical-Methodological Analysis.Michiru Nagatsu & Judith Favereau - 2020 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 50 (1):45-77.
    While the history and methodology of laboratory experiments in economics have been extensively studied by philosophers, those of field experiments have not attracted much attention until recently. What is the historical context in which field experiments have been advocated? And what are the methodological rationales for conducting experiments in the field as opposed to in the lab? This article addresses these questions by combining historical and methodological perspectives. In terms of history, we show that the movement toward field experiments in (...)
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  7. The General Theory of Second Best Is More General Than You Think.David Wiens - 2020 - Philosophers' Imprint 20 (5):1-26.
    Lipsey and Lancaster's "general theory of second best" is widely thought to have significant implications for applied theorizing about the institutions and policies that most effectively implement abstract normative principles. It is also widely thought to have little significance for theorizing about which abstract normative principles we ought to implement. Contrary to this conventional wisdom, I show how the second-best theorem can be extended to myriad domains beyond applied normative theorizing, and in particular to more abstract theorizing about the normative (...)
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  8. Robots and us: towards an economics of the ‘Good Life’.C. W. M. Naastepad & Jesse M. Mulder - 2018 - Review of Social Economy:1-33.
    (Expected) adverse effects of the ‘ICT Revolution’ on work and opportunities for individuals to use and develop their capacities give a new impetus to the debate on the societal implications of technology and raise questions regarding the ‘responsibility’ of research and innovation (RRI) and the possibility of achieving ‘inclusive and sustainable society’. However, missing in this debate is an examination of a possible conflict between the quest for ‘inclusive and sustainable society’ and conventional economic principles guiding capital allocation (including the (...)
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  9. Strategizing with others' misperceptions of luck in extreme performances.Chengwei Liu - 2017 - Academy of Management Proceedings 2017 (1).
    Research suggests that people tend to be fooled by randomness and mistake luck for skill, particularly when evaluating extreme performances. I argue that these predictable mistakes can be translated into a source of competitive advantage: informed managers can exploit others’ misperceptions of luck, such as by arbitraging in strategic factor markets. I then discuss limits to this arbitrage strategy due to social constraints: stakeholders may not be able to accurately evaluate performances and may disapprove atypical strategic activities, suggesting that only (...)
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  10. Modèles et simulations à base d’agents dans les sciences économiques et sociales : de l’exploration conceptuelle à une variété de manières d’expérimenter.Denis Phan & Franck Varenne - 2017 - In Gilles Campagnolo & Jean-Sébastien Gharbi (eds.), Philosophie économique: un état des lieux. Paris: Éditions matériologiques. pp. 347-382. Translated by Gilles Campagnolo.
    Les modèles basés sur des agents en interactions, constituent des systèmes sociaux complexes, qui peuvent être simulés par informatiques. Ils se répandent dans les sciences économiques et sociales - comme dans la plupart des sciences des systèmes complexes. Des énigmes épistémologiques (ré)apparaissent. On a souvent opposé modèles et investigations empiriques : d’un côté, on considère les sciences empiriques fondées sur une observation méthodique (enquêtes, expériences) tandis que de l’autre, on conçoit les approches théoriques et la modélisation comme s’appuyant sur une (...)
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  11. Linguistic Structures and Economic Outcomes.Clas Weber & Astghik Mavisakalyan - 2017 - Journal of Economics Surveys 32 (3):916-939.
    Linguistic structures have recently started to attract attention from economists as determinants of economic phenomena. This paper provides the first comprehensive review of this nascent literature and its achievements so far. First, we explore the complex connections between language, culture, thought and behaviour. Then, we summarize the empirical evidence on the relationship between linguistic structures and economic and social outcomes. We follow up with a discussion of data, empirical design and identification. The paper concludes by discussing implications for future research (...)
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  12. Idealization Xiv: Models in Science.Giacomo Borbone & Krzysztof Brzechczyn (eds.) - 2016 - Boston: Brill | Rodopi.
    The book "Idealization XIV: Models in Science" offers a detailed ontological, epistemological and historical account of the role of models in scientific practice. The volume contains contributions of different international scholars who developed many aspects of the use of idealizations and models both in the natural and the social sciences. This volume is particularly relevant because it offers original contributions concerning one of the main topic in philosophy of science: the role of models in such branches of the sciences and (...)
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  13. Between Isolations and Constructions: Economic Models as Believable Worlds.Lukasz Hardt - 2016 - Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 106.
    As the title of this essay suggests, my concern is with the issue of what are economic models. However, the goal of the paper is not to offer an in-depth study on multiple approaches to modelling in economics, but rather to overcome the dichotomical divide between conceptualizing models as isolations and constructions. This is done by introducing the idea of economic models as believable worlds, precisely descriptions of mechanisms that refer to the essentials of the modelled targets. In doing so (...)
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  14. A Brief Epistemology of Economic Models. A Short Essay in Philosophy of Science.Tommaso Ostillio - 2016 - In Blazej Podgorski (ed.), Zeszyty Programu Top 15. Kozminski University Press. pp. 9-49.
    This paper attempts to construct a short epistemology of economic models by using as a benchmark a comparison between the methodological issues of contemporary physics and of economics. In particular, the paper focuses on the role of indeterminacy in either sciences. Herein the general claim is that the models of economics fail at dealing with uncertainty as effectively as the models of natural sciences because economists did not manage to overcome the identification problem that is peculiar to economics. In this (...)
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  15. Zeszyty Programu Top 15.Blazej Podgorski (ed.) - 2016 - Kozminski University Press.
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  16. Hayek's Epistemic Theory of Industrial Fluctuations.Scott Scheall - 2015 - History of Economic Ideas (1):101-122.
    F.A. Hayek essentially quit economic theory and gave up the phenomena of industrial fluctuations as an explicit object of theoretical investigation following the publication of his last work in technical economics, 1941’s The Pure Theory of Capital. Nonetheless, several of Hayek’s more methodologically-oriented writings bear important implications for economic phenomena, especially those of industrial fluctuations. Decisions (usually, for Hayek, of a political nature) taken on the basis of a “pretence” of knowledge impede the operation of the price system’s belief-coordinating function (...)
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  17. Genuine, non-calculative trust with calculative antecedents: Reconsidering Williamson on trust.Marc A. Cohen - 2014 - Journal of Trust Research 4 (1):44-56.
    This short paper defends Oliver Williamson’s (1993) claim that talk of trust is ‘redundant at best and can be misleading’ when trust is defined as a form of calculated risk (p. 463). And this paper accepts Williamson’s claim that ‘Calculative trust is a contradiction in terms’ (p. 463). But the present paper defends a conception of genuine, non-calculative trust that is compatible with calculative considerations and calculative antecedents. This conception of trust creates space for genuine (non-calculative) trust relationships in the (...)
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  18. Logic, rationality and knowledge in Ramsey's thought: reassessing 'human logic'.Marion Gaspard - 2014 - Journal of Economic Methodology 21 (2):139-157.
    This paper reconsiders Frank Ramsey's essay on subjective probability (1926) as a consistent way to articulate logic, rationality and knowledge. The first part of the essay builds an axiomatic theory of subjective probability based on ‘formal logic’, defining rationality as choice-consistency. The second part seems to open up different horizons: the evaluation of degrees of belief by ‘human logic’. Because of the interest Keynes (1931) had taken in ‘human logic’, it was considered to be a possible alternative to the formal (...)
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  19. Norm manipulation, Norm evasion: Experimental evidence.Cristina Bicchieri & Alex K. Chavez - 2013 - Economics and Philosophy 29 (2):175-198.
    Using an economic bargaining game, we tested for the existence of two phenomena related to social norms, namely norm manipulation – the selection of an interpretation of the norm that best suits an individual – and norm evasion – the deliberate, private violation of a social norm. We found that the manipulation of a norm of fairness was characterized by a self-serving bias in beliefs about what constituted normatively acceptable behaviour, so that an individual who made an uneven bargaining offer (...)
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  20. A reply to Lehtinen, Teschl and Pattanaik.Daniel M. Hausman - 2013 - Journal of Economic Methodology 20 (2):219-223.
  21. Teoría fenomenológica general del bienestar y la elección social.Rodrigo Lopez-Pablos - 2013 - Revista de Economía Política de Buenos Aires 12 (7):105-133.
    By introducing elements of phenomenological philosophy to the analysis of human needs in economics; from Sartrean postulates as well as the nature and essence of individual’s needs, has been revealed a theorethical framework that serves to ponder human being’s existential behavior by means of their phenomenologic social choices and welfare. Defining a planning agent under strong assumptions of rationality and projective efficacious capabilities, the Arrow’s theorem has been proved for the economic agent aware of its finitude in this world.
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  22. Evolution and Rationality: Decisions, Co-operation and Strategic Behaviour, Samir Okasha and Ken Binmore (eds.). Cambridge University Press, 2012, x + 281 pages. [REVIEW]Ryan Muldoon - 2013 - Economics and Philosophy 29 (3):425-430.
  23. Corporations, profit maximization and the personal sphere.Waheed Hussain - 2012 - Economics and Philosophy 28 (3):311-331.
    The efficiency argument for profit maximization says that corporations and their managers should maximize profits because this is the course of action that will lead to an ‘economically efficient’ or ‘welfare maximizing’ outcome. In this paper, I argue that the fundamental problem with this argument is not that markets in the real world are less than perfect, but rather that the argument does not properly acknowledge the personal sphere. Morality allows each of us a sphere in which we are free (...)
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  24. Unacceptable risks and the continuity axiom.Karsten Klint Jensen - 2012 - Economics and Philosophy 28 (1):31-42.
    Consider a sequence of outcomes of descending value, A > B > C >... > Z. According to Larry Temkin, there are reasons to deny the continuity axiom in certain ‘extreme’ cases, i.e. cases of triplets of outcomes A, B and Z, where A and B differ little in value, but B and Z differ greatly. But, Temkin argues, if we assume continuity for ‘easy’ cases, i.e. cases where the loss is small, we can derive continuity for the ‘extreme’ case (...)
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  25. Why We Cooperate. [REVIEW]Mattia Gallotti - 2011 - Economics and Philosophy 27 (2):183-190.
  26. On Becker’s Studies of Marijuana Use as an Example of Analytic Induction.Martyn Hammersley - 2011 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 41 (4):535-566.
    Analytic induction (AI) is an interpretation of scientific method that emerged in early twentieth-century sociology and still has some influence today. Among the studies often cited as examples are Becker’s articles on marijuana use. While these have been given less attention than the work of Lindesmith on opiate addiction and Cressey on financial trust violation, Becker’s work has distinctive features. Furthermore, it raises some important and interesting issues that relate not only to AI but to social scientific explanation more generally. (...)
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  27. The moral basis of prosperity and oppression: Altruism, other-regarding behaviour and identity.Kaushik Basu - 2010 - Economics and Philosophy 26 (2):189-216.
    Much of economics is built on the assumption that individuals are driven by self-interest and economic development is an outcome of the free play of such individuals. On the few occasions that the existence of altruism is recognized in economics, the tendency is to build this from the axiom of individual selfishness. The aim of this paper is to break from this tradition and to treat as a primitive that individuals are endowed with the ‘cooperative spirit’, which allows them to (...)
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  28. Reciprocity: An Economics of Social Relations, Serge C. Kolm. Cambridge University Press, 2008. xi + 390 pages. [REVIEW]Luigino Bruni - 2010 - Economics and Philosophy 26 (2):241-247.
  29. Varieties of altruism.Philip Kitcher - 2010 - Economics and Philosophy 26 (2):121-148.
    Discussions of altruism occur in three importantly different contexts. During the past four decades, evolutionary theory has been concerned with the possibility that forms of behaviour labelled as altruistic could emerge and could be maintained under natural selection. In these discussions, an agent A is said to act altruistically towards a beneficiary B when A's action promotes the expected reproductive success of B at expected reproductive cost to A. This sort of altruism, biological altruism, is quite different from the kind (...)
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  30. Philosophical egoism: Its nature and limitations.Hans Bernhard Schmid - 2010 - Economics and Philosophy 26 (2):217-240.
    Egoism and altruism are unequal contenders in the explanation of human behaviour. While egoism tends to be viewed as natural and unproblematic, altruism has always been treated with suspicion, and it has often been argued that apparent cases of altruistic behaviour might really just be some special form of egoism. The reason for this is that egoism fits into our usual theoretical views of human behaviour in a way that altruism does not. This is true on the biological level, where (...)
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  31. Opportunity as mutual advantage.Robert Sugden - 2010 - Economics and Philosophy 26 (1):47-68.
    This paper argues that measurements of opportunity which focus on the contents of a person's opportunity set fail to capture open-ended aspects of opportunity that liberals should value. I propose an alternative conception of which does not require the explicit specification of opportunity sets, and which rests on an understanding of persons as responsible rather than rational agents. I suggest that issues of distributive fairness are best framed in terms of real income, and that meaningful measurements of real income are (...)
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  32. Foundations of ambiguity and economic modelling.Sujoy Mukerji - 2009 - Economics and Philosophy 25 (3):297-302.
    Are foundations of models of ambiguity-sensitive preferences too flawed to be usefully applied to economic models? Al-Najjar and Weinstein (2009) say such is indeed the case. In this paper, first, we point out that many of the key arguments by Al-Najjar and Weinstein do not apply to quite a few of the ambiguity preference models of more recent vintage, and therefore to that extent do not undermine the foundational aspects or applicability of ambiguity models in general. Second, we argue the (...)
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  33. A response to Bruni and Sugden.Julie A. Nelson - 2009 - Economics and Philosophy 25 (2):187-193.
    An article by Luigino Bruni and Robert Sugden published in this journal argues that market relations contain elements of what they call ‘fraternity’. This Response demonstrates that my own views on interpersonal relations and markets – which originated in the feminist analysis of caring labour – are far closer to Bruni and Sugden's than they acknowledge in their article, and goes on to discuss additional important dimensions of sociality that they neglect.
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  34. Why Friedman's methodology did not generate consensus among economists?David Teira - 2009 - Journal of the History of Economic Thought 31 (2):201-214.
    In this paper I study how the theoretical categories of consumption theory were used by Milton Friedman in order to classify empirical data and obtain predictions. Friedman advocated a case by case definition of these categories that traded theoretical coherence for empirical content. I contend that this methodological strategy puts a clear incentive to contest any prediction contrary to our interest: it can always be argued that these predictions rest on a wrong classification of data. My conjecture is that this (...)
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  35. The Grammar of Society: The Nature and Dynamics of Social Norms, by Cristina Bicchieri. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press 2006, xvi + 260 pp. [REVIEW]Graciela Küchle & Diego Ríos - 2008 - Economics and Philosophy 24 (1):117-123.
  36. Economics and Social Interaction: Accounting for Interpersonal Relations, Benedetto Gui and Robert Sugden (eds). Cambridge University Press, 2005, xv + 299 pages. [REVIEW]Luis Miguel Miller - 2008 - Economics and Philosophy 24 (2):283-287.
  37. Econopower: How a New Generation of Economists is Transforming the World.Mark Skousen - 2008 - Wiley.
    The power of economic thinking can be explained by seven core principles which include accountability, investments, economy, incentive, freedom of choice, nondiscrimination and one price. By understanding and incorporating these principles, better decisions will be made on individual, corporate and government levels. To explain this thesis, the author offers analyses of key economists who have changed their views over time, an examination of major domestic and international issues, and an explanation of how economists can predict which politicians will be successful.
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  38. Comments on the potential significance of neuroeconomics for economic theory.Ran Spiegler - 2008 - Economics and Philosophy 24 (3):515-521.
    In this short note I speculate about the various ways in which the study of neurological aspects of decision making could be fruitful for economic modelling.
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  39. Teamwork: Multi-disciplinary perspectives, edited by Natalie gold. Palgrave Macmillan, 2005, XXVI+253 pages. [REVIEW]Nicholas Bardsley - 2007 - Economics and Philosophy 23 (2):237-240.
  40. The importance of defining the feasible set.Tyler Cowen - 2007 - Economics and Philosophy 23 (1):1-14.
    How should we define the feasible set? Even when individuals agree on facts and values, as traditionally construed, different views on feasibility may suffice to produce very different policy conclusions. Focusing on the difficulties in the feasibility concept may help us resolve some policy disagreements, or at least identify the sources of those disagreements. Feasibility is most plausibly a matter of degree rather than of kind. Normative economic reasoning therefore faces a fuzzy social budget constraint. Iterative reasoning about feasibility and (...)
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  41. Philosophy of Social Science in a nutshell: from discourse to model and experiment.Michel Dubois & Denis Phan - 2007 - In Denis Phan & Phan Amblard (eds.), Agent Based Modelling and Simulations in the Human and Social Siences. Oxford: The Bardwell Press. pp. 393-431.
    The debates on the scientificity of social sciences in general, and sociology in particular, are recurring. From the original methodenstreitat the end the 19th Century to the contemporary controversy on the legitimacy of “regional epistemologies”, a same set of interrogations reappears. Are social sciences really scientific? And if so, are they sciences like other sciences? How should we conceive “research programs” Lakatos (1978) or “research traditions” for Laudan (1977) able to produce advancement of knowledge in the field of social and (...)
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  42. A prolegomenon to nonlinear empiricism in the human behavioral sciences.Charles Efferson & Peter J. Richerson - 2007 - Biology and Philosophy 22 (1):1-33.
    We propose a general framework for integrating theory and empiricism in human evolutionary ecology. We specifically emphasize the joint use of stochastic nonlinear dynamics and information theory. To illustrate critical ideas associated with historical contingency and complex dynamics, we review recent research on social preferences and social learning from behavioral economics. We additionally examine recent work on ecological approaches in history, the modeling of chaotic populations, and statistical application of information theory.
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  43. Economic sociology as a strange other to both sociology and economics.John H. Finch - 2007 - History of the Human Sciences 20 (2):123-140.
    Economic sociologists have developed and applied theories and concepts in close connection with broadly economic phenomena, including, recently, embeddedness and actor network theory. Key to these theories is understandings of action given uncertainty in which actors develop calculative capabilities, and an emphasis on markets with boundaries and interstices as essential properties. This article reflects upon the connections between Parsons' and Smelser's economic sociology and that of contemporary authors including Granovetter, Callon and White. As a strange other to economics and to (...)
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  44. The renewal of critique in neocapitalism.Claude Gautier - 2007 - Critical Horizons 8 (1):116-129.
  45. Money as tool, money as drug: The biological psychology of a strong incentive.Stephen E. G. Lea & Paul Webley - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (2):161-209.
    Why are people interested in money? Specifically, what could be the biological basis for the extraordinary incentive and reinforcing power of money, which seems to be unique to the human species? We identify two ways in which a commodity which is of no biological significance in itself can become a strong motivator. The first is if it is used as a tool, and by a metaphorical extension this is often applied to money: it is used instrumentally, in order to obtain (...)
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  46. Ambiguity and logic, by Frederic Schick. Cambridge university press, 2003, IX + 154 pages. [REVIEW]Erik J. Olsson - 2005 - Economics and Philosophy 21 (1):161-164.
  47. Workfare: the Subjection of Labour.Daniel Attas & Avner De-Shalit - 2004 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (3):309-320.
    When viewed as a question of distributive justice the evaluation of workfare typically reflects exclusively on the distribution of income: do the physically capable have a justified claim for state support, or is it fair to demand from those who do work to subsidise this support? Rarely is workfare appraised in terms of how it affects other parties such as employers or other workers, and on the structural effects the pattern of incentives it generates brings about, or as an issue (...)
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  48. Authority in the firm (and the attempt to theorize it away).David Ciepley - 2004 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 16 (1):81-115.
    Abstract The classical case for market society appeals to the complementary goods of economic liberty and maximum wealth. A market society overgrown with economic firms, however, partly sacrifices liberty for the sake of wealth. This point was accepted by prewar, theorists of the economic firm, such as Frank Knight and Ronald Coase, and the attempt to moderate, or compensate for, the constriction of economic liberty was a central struggle of the Progressive Era. Since World War II, however, neoclassical economists have (...)
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  49. Polanyi and the history of capitalism: Rejoinder to Blyth.Santhi Hejeebu & Deirdre McCloskey - 2004 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 16 (1):135-142.
    Mark Blyth's rebuttal to our constructive critique of Polanyi “blithely” takes for granted the accuracy of Polanyi's now‐outdated historiography of capitalism—by means of a loose, overly expansive definition of capitalism that question‐beggingly equates it with modernity. Blyth emphasizes the need to view markets as “socially embedded,” with which we agree—but he appears not to take account of the individual self‐interest that is thus embedded. Similarly, he asserts a priori the role of ideas in history, in parallel to the economists he (...)
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  50. The theory of the individual in economics: identity and value.John Bryan Davis - 2003 - New York: Routledge.
    The concept of the individual and his/her motivations is a bedrock of philosophy. All strands of thought at heart contain to a particular theory of the individual. Economics, though, is guilty of taking this hugely important concept without questioning how we theorize it. This superb book remedies this oversight. The new approach put forward by Davies is to pay more attention to what moral philosophy may offer us in the study of personal identity, self consciousness and will. This crosses the (...)
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