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  1. Classes of Agent and the Moral Logic of the Pali Canon.Martin T. Adam - 2008 - Argumentation 22 (1):115-124.
    This paper aims to lay bare the underlying logical structure of early Buddhist moral thinking. It argues that moral vocabulary in the Pali Suttas varies depending on the kind of agent under discussion and that this variance reflects an understanding that the phenomenology of moral experience also differs on the same basis. An attempt is made to spell this out in terms of attachment. The overall picture of Buddhist ethics that emerges is that of an agent-based moral contextualism. This account (...)
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  2. Against No-Ātman Theories of Anattā.Miri Albahari - 2002 - Asian Philosophy 12 (1):5-20.
    Suppose we were to randomly pick out a book on Buddhism or Eastern Philosophy and turn to the section on 'no-self' (anatt?). On this central teaching, we would most likely learn that the Buddha rejected the Upanisadic notion of Self (?tman), maintaining that a person is no more than a bundle of impermanent, conditioned psycho-physical aggregates (khandhas). The rejection of ?tman is seen by many to separate the metaphysically 'extravagant' claims of Hinduism from the austere tenets of Buddhism. The status (...)
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  3. Compassion and Benevolence: A Comparative Study of Early Buddhist and Classical Confucian Ethics.Ok-Sun An - 1997 - Peter Lang.
  4. Всеобъемлюдее руководство по Абхидхамме (Russian translation of Comprehensive Manual of Abhidhamma).A. Anuruddha - 2017 - Moscow: Ganga.
    Современный перевод "Абхидхамматтха-сангахи" ("Руководства по Абхидхамме") предлагает введение в фундаментальную философскую психологию буддизма. Начиная со времени своего написания в XI или XII веке, "Сангаха" служит ключом к мудрости, содержащейся в Абхидхамме. В книге исследуются основные вопросы Абхидхаммы, включая состояния сознания и ментальные факторы, функции и процессы ума, материальный мир, взаимозависимое происхождение, а также методы и стадии медитации. Данная работа представляет собой точный перевод "Сангахи", сопровождающийся оригинальным текстом на пали и комментариями. Этот детальный путеводитель с более чем 40 таблицами и диаграммами (...)
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  5. The Relationship of the Karmic to the Nirvanic in Theravāda Buddhism.Harvey B. Aronson - 1979 - Journal of Religious Ethics 7 (1):28 - 36.
    In their popular works on Theravāda, Winston King and Melford Spiro assert that this type of Buddhism is actually two distinct religions--(1) the "kammatic" which leads to better rebirth, and (2) the "nibbanic" leading to escape from rebirth. The techniques and lifestyles associated with these two are seen as polar opposites with householders being associated with the former and monks, the latter. If, however, as a case in point we look at the relationship between the karmic meditations on love, compassion, (...)
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  6. The Effects of Momentariness on Karma and Rebirth in Theravāda Buddhism.Adam L. Barborich - 2017 - In Proceedings of the International Conference on Indian Cultural Heritage: Past, Present and Future. Bhubaneswar, India: Institute of Media Studies. pp. 01-05.
    In the development of Indian Buddhism we begin to see a shift away from the early Buddhist epistemology based in phenomenology and process metaphysics toward a type of event-based metaphysics. This shift began in the reductionist methodology of the Abhidhamma and culminated in a theory of momentariness based in rationalism and abstraction, rather than early Buddhist empiricism. While early Buddhism followed an extensional model of temporal consciousness, when methodological reductionism was applied to the concept of time, it necessarily resulted in (...)
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  7. Theory and Comparison in the Discussion of Buddhist Ethics.Michael G. Barnhart - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (1):16-43.
    Comparisons, and by that I mean the hunt for essential similarities or at least serious family resemblances, between the ethical views of Western and non-Western thinkers have been a staple of comparative philosophy for quite some time now. Some of these comparisons, such as between the views of Aristotle and Confucius, seem especially apt and revealing. However, I’ve often wondered whether Western “ethical theory”—virtue ethics, deontology, or consequentialism—is always the best lens through which to approach non-Western ethical thought. Particularly when (...)
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  8. Reinventing the Wheel: A Buddhist Response to the Information Age (Review).Michael G. Barnhart - 2001 - Philosophy East and West 51 (3):414-418.
  9. Buddhist Philosophy of the Theravāda.N. K. Bhagwat - 2006 - Bharatiya Kala Prakashan.
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  10. The Budhistic [Sic] Philosophy of the Theravada School, as Embodied in the Pali Abhidhamma.N. K. Bhagwat - 1929 - Patna, Patna University.
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  11. The Numerical Discourses of the Buddha.Bhikkhu Bodhi - 2012 - Wisdom.
    Drawn from the Anguttara Nikaya, Numerical Discourses of the Buddha brings together teachings of the Buddha ranging from basic ethical observances recommended to the busy man or woman of the world, to the more rigorous instructions on mental training prescribed for the monks and nuns. The Anguttara Nikaya is a part of the Pali Canon, the authorized recension of the Buddha's Word for followers of Theravada Buddhism, the form of Buddhism prevailing in the Buddhist countries of southern Asia. These discourses (...)
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  12. A Comprehensive Manual of Abdhidhamma.Bhikkhu Bodhi - 2003 - BPS.
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  13. The Connected Discourses of the Buddha.Bhikkhu Bodhi - 2003 - Wisdom.
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  14. The Middle-Length Discourses of the Buddha.Bhikkhu Bodhi - 2003 - Wisdom.
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  15. Jayatilleke on a Concept of Meaninglessness in the Pāli Nikāyas.George Chatalian - 1968 - Philosophy East and West 18 (1/2):67-76.
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  16. Essays in Buddhism and Pāli Literature.Angraj Chaudhary - 1994 - Eastern Book Linkers.
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  17. Buddhist Thought in India: Three Phases of Buddhist Philosophy.Edward Conze - 1962 - Allen & Unwin.
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  18. Mind in Indian Buddhist Philosophy.Christian Coseru - 2009 - In Edward N. Zalta (ed.), Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Perhaps no other classical philosophical tradition, East or West, offers a more complex and counter-intuitive account of mind and mental phenomena than Buddhism. While Buddhists share with other Indian philosophers the view that the domain of the mental encompasses a set of interrelated faculties and processes, they do not associate mental phenomena with the activity of a substantial, independent, and enduring self or agent. Rather, Buddhist theories of mind center on the doctrine of no-self (Pāli anatta, Skt.[1] anātma), which postulates (...)
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  19. Changing the Landscape of Theravada Studies.Kate Crosby - 2008 - Contemporary Buddhism 9 (1):1-6.
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  20. The Changing Connotation of Dharma in the Early Indian Context: A Problem in Plurality and Dilemmas.Nupur Dasgupta - manuscript
    This paper presents the perspectives of the past and some present readings with regard to the genesis of the concept of Dharma a comprehensive term for social and moral principles in the early Indian society. Taking a broad view from different genres of the early Indian literature, it is observed that the concept and practices of Dharma has taken a multi-linear path of evolution with several simultaneous trends branching into several directions. There were forces of differences, discontinuities and connections in (...)
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  21. A Buddhist Manual of Psychological Ethics of the Fourth Century B.C.: Being a Translation, Now Made for the First Time, From the Original Pali, of the First Book in the Abhidhamma Piṭaka, Entitled Dhamma-Sangaṇi (Compendium of States or Phenomena).Caroline A. F. Rhys Davids (ed.) - 1900 - Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers.
    Hesperides Press are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.
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  22. Meditation and Consciousness: Can We Experience Experience as Broken?Jake H. Davis - forthcoming - In Rocco J. Gennaro (ed.), Routledge Handbook of Consciousness. Routledge.
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  23. 'When You Know for Yourselves': Mindfulness and the Development of Wisdom.Jake H. Davis - 2017 - In A Mirror is For Reflection: Understanding Buddhist Ethics. New York, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 224-235.
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  24. 'The Scope for Wisdom’: Early Buddhism on Reasons and Persons.Jake H. Davis - 2016 - In Shyam Ranganathan (ed.), The Bloomsbury Research Handbook of Indian Ethics. Bloomsbury Academic.
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  25. Facing Up to the Question of Ethics in Mindfulness-Based Interventions.Jake H. Davis - 2015 - Mindfulness 6 (1):46-48.
  26. From the Five Aggregates to Phenomenal Consciousness: Toward a Cross-Cultural Cognitive Science.Jake H. Davis & Evan Thompson - 2013 - In Steven M. Emmanuel (ed.), A Companion to Buddhist Philosophy. Wiley.
    Buddhism originated and developed in an Indian cultural context that featured many first-person practices for producing and exploring states of consciousness through the systematic training of attention. In contrast, the dominant methods of investigating the mind in Western cognitive science have emphasized third-person observation of the brain and behavior. In this chapter, we explore how these two different projects might prove mutually beneficial. We lay the groundwork for a cross-cultural cognitive science by using one traditional Buddhist model of the mind (...)
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  27. Can Enlightenment Be Traced to Specific Neural Correlates, Cognition, or Behavior? No, and (a Qualified) Yes.Jake H. Davis & David Vago - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology: Consciousness Research 4:870.
  28. The Role of Puñña and Kusala in the Dialectic of the Twofold Right Vision and the Temporary Integration of Eternalism in the Path Towards Spiritual Emancipation According to the Pāli Nikāyas.Krishna Del Toso - 2008 - Esercizi Filosofici 3 (3):32-58.
    Abstract: This article shows how in the Pāli Nikāyas, after having defined Eternalism and Nihilism as two opposed positions, Gotama makes a dialectical use of Eternalism as means to eliminate Nihilism, upheld to be the worst point of view because of its denial of kammic maturation in terms of puñña and pāpa. Assuming, from an Eternalist perspective, that actions have effects also beyond the present life, Gotama underlines the necessity of betting on the validity of moral kammic retribution. Having thus (...)
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  29. Our Mentality Through the Ages, and Then to Nibbana: The Path of Evolution.Basil J. deSilva - 2008 - Main Distributors, Buddhist Cultural Centre.
  30. Concept of Emptiness in Pāli Literature.Mădavacciyē Dhammajōti - 2009 - Godage International Publishers.
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  31. Is Mindfulness Present-Centred and Non-Judgmental? A Discussion of the Cognitive Dimensions of Mindfulness.Georges Dreyfus - 2011 - Contemporary Buddhism 12 (1):41--54.
  32. Le Bouddha philosophe? Recherche sur quelques" non-concepts" du Sutta-Piṭaka (Canon Pāli).Roger-Pol Droit - 1986 - le Cahier (Collège International de Philosophie) 2:82-86.
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  33. What Kind of Free Will Did the Buddha Teach?Asaf Federman - 2010 - Philosophy East and West 60 (1):pp. 1-19.
    Recently, some contradictory statements have been made concerning whether or not the Buddha taught free will. Here, a comparative method is used to examine what exactly is meant by free will, and to determine to what extent this meaning is applicable to early Buddhist thought as recorded in the Pāli Nikāyas. The comparative method reveals parallels between contemporary criticisms of Cartesian philosophy and Buddhist criticisms of Brahmanical and Jain doctrines. Although in Cartesian terms Buddhism promotes no recognizable theory of free (...)
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  34. Can We Reinvent Ourselves?Bronwyn Finnigan - 2018 - IAI News.
    This brief article presents a Buddhist answer to the question of whether self-transformation possible and, if so, how it can be achieved.
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  35. Buddhist Philosophy: Essential Readings.Jay Garfield & William Edelgass (eds.) - 2009 - Oup Usa.
    The Buddhist philosophical tradition is vast, internally diverse, and comprises texts written in a variety of canonical languages. It is hence often difficult for those with training in Western philosophy who wish to approach this tradition for the first time to know where to start, and difficult for those who wish to introduce and teach courses in Buddhist philosophy to find suitable textbooks that adequately represent the diversity of the tradition, expose students to important primary texts in reliable translations, that (...)
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  36. On Nature of Time and Abhidhamma Concept of ‘Moment’ (Khana).Evgeniy Gavrilov - manuscript
    Conceptual time in our mind has such qualities as authoritative and regular flow, where each unit of time is (artificially made) equal to the same unit of time in the future or in the past. The duration of a second is always the same, there can not be two seconds with different durations. For our daily life this idea sounds obvious and automatically accepted as a basic quality of time itself. But this is so only because the object on which (...)
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  37. The Buddhist Path to Awakening.R. Gethin - 2003 - Oneworld.
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  38. On Some Definitions of Mindfulness.Rupert Gethin - 2011 - Contemporary Buddhism 12 (1):263--279.
    The Buddhist technical term was first translated as ?mindfulness? by T.W. Rhys Davids in 1881. Since then various authors, including Rhys Davids, have attempted definitions of what precisely is meant by mindfulness. Initially these were based on readings and interpretations of ancient Buddhist texts. Beginning in the 1950s some definitions of mindfulness became more informed by the actual practice of meditation. In particular, Nyanaponika's definition appears to have had significant influence on the definition of mindfulness adopted by those who developed (...)
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  39. The Five Khandhas: Their Theatment in the Nikāyas and Early Abhidhamma. [REVIEW]Rupert Gethin - 1986 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 14 (1):35-53.
    To explain the khandhas as the Buddhist analysis of man, as has been the tendency of contemporary scholars, may not be incorrect as far as it goes, yet it is to fix upon one facet of the treatment of the khandhas at the expense of others. Thus A. B. Keith could write, “By a division which ... has certainly no merit, logical or psychological, the individual is divided into five aggregates or groups.” However, the five khandhas, as treated in the (...)
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  40. Karma and the Possibility of Purification: An Ethical and Psychological Analysis of the Doctrine of Karma in Buddhism.Lynken Ghose - 2007 - Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (2):259-290.
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  41. Hebrew and Buddhist Selves: A Constructive Postmodern Study.Nicholas F. Gier & Johnson Petta - 2007 - Asian Philosophy 17 (1):47 – 64.
    Our task will be to demonstrate that there are instructive parallels between Hebrew and Buddhist concepts of self. There are at least five main constituents (skandhas in Sanskrit) of the Hebrew self: (1) nepe as living being; (2) rah as indwelling spirit; (3) lb as heart-mind; (4) bāār as flesh; and (5) dām as blood. We will compare these with the five Buddhist skandhas: disposition (samskāra), consciousness (vijñāna), feeling (vedanā), perception (samjñā), and body (rpa). Generally, what we will discover is (...)
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  42. The Role of Fear (Bhaya) in the Nikāyas and in the Abhidhamma.Giuliano Giustarini - 2012 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 40 (5):511-531.
    According to Buddhist soteriology, fear is a direct cause of suffering and one of the main obstacles in the path to liberation. Pāli Suttas and Abhidhamma present a number of sophisticated strategies to deal with fear and to overcome it. Nevertheless, in the Nikāyas and in the Abhidhamma there are also consistent instructions about implementing fear in meditative practices and considering it as a valuable ally in the pursuit of nibbāna By means of a lexicographical study of selected passages and (...)
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  43. The Development and Use of the Eight Precepts for Lay Practitioners, Upāsakas and Upāsikās in Theravāda Buddhism in the West.Jacquetta Gomes - 2004 - Contemporary Buddhism 5 (1):47-63.
    (2004). The development and use of the eight precepts for lay practitioners, Upāsakas and Upāsikās in Theravāda Buddhism in the West. Contemporary Buddhism: Vol. 5, No. 1, pp. 47-63.
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  44. Proto-Mādhyamika in the Pāli Canon.Luis O. Gómez - 1976 - Philosophy East and West 26 (2):137-165.
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  45. Some Aspects of the Free-Will Question in the Nikāyas.Luis O. Gómez - 1975 - Philosophy East and West 25 (1):81-90.
  46. Analytical Buddhism: The Two-Tiered Illusion of Self.Charles Goodman - 2009 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87 (1):159 – 162.
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  47. Consequences of Compassion: An Interpretation and Defense of Buddhist Ethics.Charles Goodman - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Fundamental Buddhist teachings -- Main features of some western ethical theories -- Teravāda ethics as rule-consequentialism -- Mahāyāna ethics before Śāntideva and after -- Transcending ethics -- Buddhist ethics and the demands of consequentialism -- Buddhism on moral responsibility -- Punishment -- Objections and replies -- A Buddhist response to Kant.
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  48. How Many Sounds Are in Pāli?Alastair Gornall - 2014 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 42 (5):511-550.
    This article highlights the central importance of Pāli phonetics in Theravāda Buddhism. In doing so, I focus on a single yet fundamental point of contention regarding the number of sounds in the Pāli language from the twelfth to fifteenth century. I argue that this debate on the number of sounds was of central concern due to the importance of Pāli pronunciation in the ritual sphere, the development of new regional monastic identities, and the introduction of regional scripts. In tracing this (...)
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  49. Why the Buddha Did Not Discuss "The Problem of Free Will and Determinism".Christopher W. Gowans - 2017 - In Rick Repetti (ed.), Buddhist Perspectives on Free Will: Agentless Agency? New York: Routledge. pp. 11-21.
    I argue that the Buddha did not discuss the free will and determinism problem because he only considered issues relating to overcoming suffering and his teaching about this did not raise the problem. As represented in the Nikāyas, the heart of his teaching was an empirically based account of the causes of suffering and how to modify these to end suffering. It was primarily a practical teaching about how to achieve this goal, more a craft knowledge than a philosophical theory (...)
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  50. Buddhist Moral Philosophy: An Introduction.Christopher W. Gowans - 2014 - Routledge.
    The first book of its kind, Buddhist Moral Philosophy: An Introduction introduces the reader to contemporary philosophical interpretations and analyses of Buddhist ethics. It begins with a survey of traditional Buddhist ethical thought and practice, mainly in the Pali Canon and early Mahāyāna schools, and an account of the emergence of Buddhist moral philosophy as a distinct discipline in the modern world. It then examines recent debates about karma, rebirth and nirvana, well-being, normative ethics, moral objectivity, moral psychology, and the (...)
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