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  1. Meditation and Consciousness: Can We Experience Experience as Broken?Jake H. Davis - forthcoming - In Rocco J. Gennaro (ed.), Routledge Handbook of Consciousness. Routledge.
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  2. Mereological Composition in Analytic and Buddhist Perspective.Nicholaos Jones - forthcoming - Journal of the American Philosophical Association:1-22.
    Comparing Buddhist and contemporary analytic views about mereological composition reveals significant dissimilarities about the purposes that constrain successful answers to mereological questions, the kinds of considerations taken to be probative in justifying those answers, and the value of mereological inquiry. I develop these dissimilarities by examining three questions relevant to those who deny the existence of composite wholes. The first is a question of justification: What justifies denying the existence of composite wholes as more reasonable than affirming their existence? The (...)
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  3. Abhidharmakośabhāṣya (Treasury of Metaphysics with Self-Commentary).Oren Hanner - 2021 - Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Religion.
    The Abhidharmakośabhāṣya (Treasury of Metaphysics with Self-Commentary) is a pivotal treatise on early Buddhist thought composed around the fourth or fifth century by the Indian Buddhist philosopher Vasubandhu. This work elucidates the Buddha’s teachings as synthesized and interpreted by the early Buddhist Sarvāstivāda school (“the theory that all [factors] exist”), while recording the major doctrinal polemics that developed around them, primarily those points of contention with the Sautrāntika system of thought (“followers of the scriptures”). Employing the methodology and terminology of (...)
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  4. Seeing Clearly: A Buddhist Guide to Life.Nicolas Bommarito - 2020 - New York, USA: Oxford University Press.
    Many of us, even on our happiest days, struggle to quiet the constant buzz of anxiety in the background of our minds. All kinds of worries--worries about losing people and things, worries about how we seem to others--keep us from peace of mind. Distracted or misled by our preoccupations, misconceptions, and, most of all, our obsession with ourselves, we don't see the world clearly--we don't see the world as it really is. In our search for happiness and the good life, (...)
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  5. A Problem for Ganeri’s Buddhaghosa.Nilanjan Das - 2020 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 101 (2):481-488.
  6. Qur'anic Faith and Reason: An Epistemic Comparison with the Kālāma Sutta.Abdulla Galadari - 2020 - Studies in Interreligious Dialogue 30 (1):45-67.
    The Qur’an frequently abhors blind faith based on tradition in its arguments against non-believers. Nonetheless, the Qur’an repeatedly asks people to believe in its message. How does the Qur’an distinguish between both kinds of faith? This article investigates the type of epistemology the Qur’an expects from its audience. Linguistically, the Qur’anic concept of īmān may be compared to taking refuge in Buddhism, in that it is through experience and insight (prajñā), as portrayed in the Kālāma Sutta, and not zeal. The (...)
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  7. Buddhism and Scepticism: Historical, Philosophical, and Comparative Perspectives.Oren Hanner (ed.) - 2020 - Freiburg/Bochum: ProjektVerlag.
    Is Buddhism’s attitude towards accepted forms of knowledge sceptical? Are Pyrrhonian scepticism and classical Buddhist scholasticism related in their respective applications and expressions of doubt? In what way and to what degree is Critical Buddhism an offshoot of modern scepticism? Questions such as these as well as related issues are explored in the present collection, which brings together examinations of systematic doubt in the traditions of Buddhism from a variety of perspectives. What results from the perceptive observations and profound analytical (...)
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  8. 'Going Off the Map': Dependent Arising in the Nettippakaraṇa.Dhivan Thomas Jones - 2020 - Buddhist Studies Review 36 (2):167-190.
    The early Buddhist exegetical text, the Nettippakara?a, apparently uniquely, describes the stages of the path as ‘transcendental dependent arising’, in contrast with the twelve nid?nas, called ‘worldly dependent arising’. A close reading of the Nettippakara?ain relation to another, related, exegetical text, the Pe?akopadesa, reveals that the latter interprets the same stages of the path in a different way. More broadly, while the Pe?akopadesa takes pa?icca-samupp?dato refer only to the twelve nid?nas, the Nettippakara?a’s exegetical strategy takes pa?icca-samupp?dato refer to an over-arching (...)
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  9. An Account of Generous Action and Esteem in Pāli Buddhism.Nicholaos Jones - 2020 - International Journal of Buddhist Thought and Culture 30 (2):195-225.
    I propose an account of generous action in the Pāli Buddhist tradition, whereby generous actions are instances of giving in which the donor has esteem for the recipient of their giving. The account differs from recent Anglophone accounts of generous action. These tend to construe generous actions as instances of a donor freely offering a gift to the recipient for the sake of benefiting the recipient. Unlike the Buddhist account I propose, these accounts do not require donors to esteem their (...)
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  10. Duas perspectivas buddhistas sobre a temporalidade e o renascimento.Felipe Nogueira de Carvalho - 2020 - Reflexus 14 (1):177-200.
    A doutrina do renascimento transmite a ideia de uma perspectiva temporal mais extensa, que abarca múltiplas vidas. Mas a medida em que o buddhismo chega à modernidade, outras interpretações começam a aparecer. Um exemplo é a interpretação psicológica de Ajahn Buddhadāsa, segundo a qual o termo “renascimento" se refere ao surgimento sucessivo da ideia do “eu" a cada instante de consciência. Esta interpretação diminui consideravelmente a extensão da perspectiva temporal ligada ao renascimento. Contra esta interpretação, Thānissaro Bhikkhu argumentou que uma (...)
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  11. Wilfrid Sellars and Buddhist Philosophy.Jay Garfield (ed.) - 2019 - New York, USA: Routledge.
    A collection of essays on the ways in which the work of Wilfrid Sellars and the Buddhist philosophical tradition can illuminate each other.
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  12. Disengaged Buddhism.Amod Lele - 2019 - Journal of Buddhist Ethics 26:240-89.
    Contemporary engaged Buddhist scholars typically claim either that Buddhism always endorsed social activism, or that its non-endorsement of such activism represented an unwitting lack of progress. This article examines several classical South Asian Buddhist texts that explicitly reject social and political activism. These texts argue for this rejection on the grounds that the most important sources of suffering are not something that activism can fix, and that political involvement interferes with the tranquility required for liberation. The article then examines the (...)
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  13. A Jangada do Self: Usos Soteriológicos do Eu e do Não-Eu no Buddhismo Antigo.Felipe Nogueira de Carvalho - 2019 - Paralellus 10 (24):279-294.
    O objetivo deste artigo é sugerir que os ensinamentos Buddhistas sobreanattā(não-eu) não devem ser entendidos como uma negação categórica do eu, mas fazem parte de uma estratégia soteriológica comumente empregada pelo Buddha, de utilizar algo como ferramenta para o seu próprio fim. Tomando o kamma(ação) como o elemento central que estrutura todos os ensinamentos, podemos pensar na identificação do eu como um tipo de ação. Algumas instâncias desta ação serão hábeis e condutoras à libertação, e outras inábeis e condutoras ao (...)
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  14. Happiness in Buddhism: An Experiential Approach.Desh Raj Sirswal - 2019 - Milestone Education Review 10 (01 & 02):26-30.
    Indian philosophy is a term that refers to schools of philosophical thought that originated in the Indian continent. Buddhism is one of the important school of Indian philosophical thought. Happiness is much pursued by individuals and society in all cultures. Eastern and western cultures have understood well-being and evolved ways and means to promote well-being over the years. Buddhism pursues happiness by using knowledge and practice to achieve mental equanimity. In Buddhism, equanimity, or peace of mind, is achieved by detaching (...)
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  15. A Buddhist Analysis of Affective Bias.Sean Smith - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy (1):1-31.
    In this paper, I explore a debate between some Indian Buddhist schools regarding the nature of the underlying tendencies or anusaya-s. I focus here primarily on the ninth chapter of Kathāvatthu’s representation of a dispute about whether an anusaya can be said to have intentional object. I also briefly treat of Vasubandhu’s defense of the Sautrāntika view of anuśaya in the opening section of the fifth chapter his Abhidharmakośabhāṣyam. Following Vasubandhu, I argue against the Thervādin Abhidharmikas that the underlying tendencies (...)
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  16. An Analysis of the Buddhist Doctrines of Karma and Rebirth in the Visuddhimagga.Colonel Adam L. Barborich - 2018 - Dharmavijaya Journal Of Buddhist Studies 1:09-35..
    In the Visuddhimagga, there is movement from an early Buddhist phenominalist epistemology towards essentialist ontology based in rationality and abstraction. The reductionist methodology of the Abhidhamma and reactions to it brought forth a theory of momentariness not found in early Buddhism. Abhidhamma reductionism and the concept of phenomenal dhammas led to a conception of momentary time-points and the incorporation of a cinematic model of temporal consciousness as a direct consequence of momentariness. Essentialism was incorporated into the Visuddhimagga precisely because of (...)
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  17. Can We Reinvent Ourselves?Bronwyn Finnigan - 2018 - IAI News.
    This brief article presents a Buddhist answer to the question of whether self-transformation possible and, if so, how it can be achieved.
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  18. Mindfulness and the Psychology of Ethical Dogmatism.Josef Mattes - 2018 - Journal of Buddhist Ethics 28:233-269.
    Motivated by recent controversies concerning the relationship between modern mindfulness-based interventions and Buddhism, this article discusses the relationship between mindfulness and dogmatism in general, and dogmatism in ethics in particular. The point of view taken is primarily that of the psychology of judgment and deci-sion making: Various cognitive illusions affect the feelings of righteousness and certainty that tend to accompany ethical and moral judgments. I argue that even though there is some evidence that mindfulness practice im-proves judgment and decision making, (...)
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  19. Всеобъемлюдее руководство по Абхидхамме (Russian translation of Comprehensive Manual of Abhidhamma).A. Anuruddha - 2017 - Moscow: Ganga.
    Современный перевод "Абхидхамматтха-сангахи" ("Руководства по Абхидхамме") предлагает введение в фундаментальную философскую психологию буддизма. Начиная со времени своего написания в XI или XII веке, "Сангаха" служит ключом к мудрости, содержащейся в Абхидхамме. В книге исследуются основные вопросы Абхидхаммы, включая состояния сознания и ментальные факторы, функции и процессы ума, материальный мир, взаимозависимое происхождение, а также методы и стадии медитации. Данная работа представляет собой точный перевод "Сангахи", сопровождающийся оригинальным текстом на пали и комментариями. Этот детальный путеводитель с более чем 40 таблицами и диаграммами (...)
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  20. The Effects of Momentariness on Karma and Rebirth in Theravāda Buddhism.Adam L. Barborich - 2017 - In Proceedings of the International Conference on Indian Cultural Heritage: Past, Present and Future. Bhubaneswar, India: Institute of Media Studies. pp. 01-05.
    In the development of Indian Buddhism we begin to see a shift away from the early Buddhist epistemology based in phenomenology and process metaphysics toward a type of event-based metaphysics. This shift began in the reductionist methodology of the Abhidhamma and culminated in a theory of momentariness based in rationalism and abstraction, rather than early Buddhist empiricism. While early Buddhism followed an extensional model of temporal consciousness, when methodological reductionism was applied to the concept of time, it necessarily resulted in (...)
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  21. 'When You Know for Yourselves': Mindfulness and the Development of Wisdom.Jake H. Davis - 2017 - In A Mirror is For Reflection: Understanding Buddhist Ethics. New York, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 224-235.
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  22. Why the Buddha Did Not Discuss "The Problem of Free Will and Determinism".Christopher W. Gowans - 2017 - In Rick Repetti (ed.), Buddhist Perspectives on Free Will: Agentless Agency? New York: Routledge. pp. 11-21.
    I argue that the Buddha did not discuss the free will and determinism problem because he only considered issues relating to overcoming suffering and his teaching about this did not raise the problem. As represented in the Nikāyas, the heart of his teaching was an empirically based account of the causes of suffering and how to modify these to end suffering. It was primarily a practical teaching about how to achieve this goal, more a craft knowledge than a philosophical theory (...)
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  23. Review The Gathering of Intentions Indian Philosophy Blog May 2017. [REVIEW]Swami Narasimhananda - 2017 - Indian Philosophy Blog 5.
    This book could be seen as a novel method of tracing the history of a scripture. Jacob P. Dalton does this by “tracing the vicissitudes of a single ritual system—that of the Gathering of Intentions Sutra (Dgongs pa ’dus pa’i mdo)—from its ninth-century origins to the present day” (xv). This tantra is referred to as the “root tantra” and is vital for understanding the history of Tibetan Buddhism, particularly the Nyingma school. This book is divided into seven chapters focusing on (...)
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  24. 'The Scope for Wisdom’: Early Buddhism on Reasons and Persons.Jake H. Davis - 2016 - In Shyam Ranganathan (ed.), The Bloomsbury Research Handbook of Indian Ethics. Bloomsbury Academic.
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  25. Facing Up to the Question of Ethics in Mindfulness-Based Interventions.Jake H. Davis - 2015 - Mindfulness 6 (1):46-48.
  26. Indian Buddhist Philosophy by Amber D. Carpenter. [REVIEW]Malcolm Keating - 2015 - Philosophy East and West 65 (3):1000-1003.
    Review of Amber Carpenter's "Indian Buddhist Philosophy.".
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  27. Abhidhamma Interpretations of “Persons” : With Particular Reference to the Aṅguttara Nikāya.Tse-fu Kuan - 2015 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 43 (1):31-60.
    General opinion holds that the Abhidhamma treats the Buddha’s teachings in terms of ultimate realities, i.e. dhammas, and that conventional constructs such as persons fall outside the primary concern of the Abhidhamma. The present paper re-examines this ultimate-conventional dichotomy drawn between dhammas and persons and argues that this dichotomy does not hold true for the canonical Abhidhamma in Pali. This study explores how various types of persons are interpreted and approached by the Abhidhamma material, including Abhidhamma texts such as the (...)
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  28. Book Review The Buddhist Dead Edited by Bryan J Cuevas and Jacqueline I Stone. [REVIEW]Swami Narasimhananda - 2015 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 120 (1):198.
    The giving up of the body or suicide for spiritual reasons has been dealt with by James Benn and D Max Moermane. The relationships of the dead and the living are discussed by Bryan J Cuevas, John Cliff ord Holt, and Matthew T Kapstein, while Hank Glassman, Mark Rowe, and Jason A Carbine talk about different funeral practices. With glossaries for Chinese, Japanese, and Korean characters and an elaborate index, this book is a unique peek into Buddhist practices regarding the (...)
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  29. The Hidden Aspects of the Five Precepts.Edo Shonin & William Van Gordon - 2015 - Meditation: Research and Practice.
  30. The Function of Saññā in the Perceptual Process According to the Sutta-Piṭaka: An Assessment.Krishna Del Toso - 2015 - Philosophy East and West 65 (3):690-716.
    This article deals with the meaning and function of saññā in perception according to the Suttapiṭaka. As regards its meaning, the discussion stresses the fact that the renderings “perception” and “apperception” seem to overinterpret the actual function/activity of saññā. Also the translations “idea” and “ideation” should be used cautiously, in order to avoid misunderstandings, since these terms are fraught with very specific philosophical and psychological implications in the Western context. Moreover, though “cognition” could be a good rendering, “recognition” seems to (...)
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  31. How Many Sounds Are in Pāli?: Schism, Identity and Ritual in the Theravāda Saṅgha.Alastair Gornall - 2014 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 42 (5):511-550.
    This article highlights the central importance of Pāli phonetics in Theravāda Buddhism. In doing so, I focus on a single yet fundamental point of contention regarding the number of sounds in the Pāli language from the twelfth to fifteenth century. I argue that this debate on the number of sounds was of central concern due to the importance of Pāli pronunciation in the ritual sphere, the development of new regional monastic identities, and the introduction of regional scripts. In tracing this (...)
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  32. Buddhist Moral Philosophy: An Introduction.Christopher W. Gowans - 2014 - Routledge.
    The first book of its kind, Buddhist Moral Philosophy: An Introduction introduces the reader to contemporary philosophical interpretations and analyses of Buddhist ethics. It begins with a survey of traditional Buddhist ethical thought and practice, mainly in the Pali Canon and early Mahāyāna schools, and an account of the emergence of Buddhist moral philosophy as a distinct discipline in the modern world. It then examines recent debates about karma, rebirth and nirvana, well-being, normative ethics, moral objectivity, moral psychology, and the (...)
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  33. Buddhist Responses to Globalization.Peter D. Hershock, Carolyn M. Jones Medine, Ugo Dessi, Melanie L. Harris, John W. M. Krummel & Erin McCarthy - 2014 - Lexington Books.
    This interdisciplinary collection of essays highlights the relevance of Buddhist doctrine and practice to issues of globalization. From philosophical, religious, historical, and political perspectives, the authors show that Buddhism—arguably the world’s first transnational religion—is a rich resource for navigating todays interconnected world.
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  34. On Self-Awareness and the Self.Koji Tanaka - 2014 - In Graham Priest & Damon Young (eds.), Philosophy and Martial Arts. London: Routledge. pp. 127-138.
    Some philosophers of mind, cognitive scientists, phenomenologists as well as Buddhist philosophers have claimed that an awareness of an object is not just an experience of that object but also involves self-awareness. It is sometimes argued that being aware of an object without being aware of oneself is pathological. As anyone who has been involved in martial arts, as well as any sports requiring quick responses such as cricket and tennis, can testify, however, awareness of the self at the time (...)
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  35. From the Five Aggregates to Phenomenal Consciousness: Toward a Cross-Cultural Cognitive Science.Jake H. Davis & Evan Thompson - 2013 - In Steven M. Emmanuel (ed.), A Companion to Buddhist Philosophy. Wiley.
    Buddhism originated and developed in an Indian cultural context that featured many first-person practices for producing and exploring states of consciousness through the systematic training of attention. In contrast, the dominant methods of investigating the mind in Western cognitive science have emphasized third-person observation of the brain and behavior. In this chapter, we explore how these two different projects might prove mutually beneficial. We lay the groundwork for a cross-cultural cognitive science by using one traditional Buddhist model of the mind (...)
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  36. Can Enlightenment Be Traced to Specific Neural Correlates, Cognition, or Behavior? No, and (a Qualified) Yes.Jake H. Davis & David Vago - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology: Consciousness Research 4:870.
  37. The Forerunner of All Things: Buddhaghosa on Mind, Intention, and Agency.Maria Heim - 2013 - Oup Usa.
    Scholars have long been intrigued by the Buddha's defining action (karma) as intention. This book explores systematically how intention, agency, and moral psychology were interpreted in all branches of early Theravada thought, paying special attention to the thought of the 5th-century commentator Buddhaghosa.
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  38. Introduction to Early Buddhism: Philosophical Texts, Concepts, and Questions.Frank J. Hoffman - 2013 - Research Centre for Buddhist Studies.
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  39. Patisambhidamagga as an Early Exegetical Work of Theravada Buddhism.Goran Kardas - 2013 - Filozofska Istrazivanja 33 (1):139-150.
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  40. Does Nature Have Value in the Pāli Canon?Colette Sciberras - 2013 - Environmental Values 22 (3):381-399.
    I examine whether certain aspects of early Buddhist doctrine are compatible with ascribing value to nature by focusing in particular on the doctrine of the Three Marks of Existence. This portrays the world as characterised by suffering, impermanence, and by 'not-self'. From the perspective of environmental philosophy each of these is problematic, either because nature is viewed negatively, or else because only nibbāna is valued positively, and this is understood to entail a repudiation of the world. I argue against such (...)
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  41. Margaret Cone. A Dictionary of Pāli, Part II.Andrew Skilton - 2013 - Contemporary Buddhism 14 (2):344-346.
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  42. Theory and Comparison in the Discussion of Buddhist Ethics.Michael G. Barnhart - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (1):16-43.
    Comparisons, and by that I mean the hunt for essential similarities or at least serious family resemblances, between the ethical views of Western and non-Western thinkers have been a staple of comparative philosophy for quite some time now. Some of these comparisons, such as between the views of Aristotle and Confucius, seem especially apt and revealing. However, I’ve often wondered whether Western “ethical theory”—virtue ethics, deontology, or consequentialism—is always the best lens through which to approach non-Western ethical thought. Particularly when (...)
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  43. The Numerical Discourses of the Buddha.Bhikkhu Bodhi - 2012 - Wisdom.
    Drawn from the Anguttara Nikaya, Numerical Discourses of the Buddha brings together teachings of the Buddha ranging from basic ethical observances recommended to the busy man or woman of the world, to the more rigorous instructions on mental training prescribed for the monks and nuns. The Anguttara Nikaya is a part of the Pali Canon, the authorized recension of the Buddha's Word for followers of Theravada Buddhism, the form of Buddhism prevailing in the Buddhist countries of southern Asia. These discourses (...)
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  44. The Role of Fear (Bhaya) in the Nikāyas and in the Abhidhamma.Giuliano Giustarini - 2012 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 40 (5):511-531.
    According to Buddhist soteriology, fear is a direct cause of suffering and one of the main obstacles in the path to liberation. Pāli Suttas and Abhidhamma present a number of sophisticated strategies to deal with fear and to overcome it. Nevertheless, in the Nikāyas and in the Abhidhamma there are also consistent instructions about implementing fear in meditative practices and considering it as a valuable ally in the pursuit of nibbāna By means of a lexicographical study of selected passages and (...)
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  45. Why Didn't Siddhartha Gautama Become a Samkhya Philosopher, After All?Marzenna Jakubczak - 2012 - In Irina Kuznetsova, Jonardon Ganeri & Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad (eds.), Hindu and Buddhist Ideas in Dialogue: Self and No-Self. Ashgate.
    The chapter is divided into five sections. Firstly, I shall briefly describe the phenomenon of Kāpil Maṭh, a Sāṃkhya-Yoga āśrama founded in the early twentieth century by a charismatic Bengali scholar-monk Swāmi Hariharānanda Ᾱraṇya (1869–1947); while referring to Hariharānanda’s writings I will also consider the idea of the re-establishment of an extinct philosophical school. Secondly, I shall specify the method of analysis I apply while addressing the question raised in the title of my chapter and discuss some relevant Sanskrit and (...)
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  46. Is Mindfulness Present-Centred and Non-Judgmental? A Discussion of the Cognitive Dimensions of Mindfulness.Georges Dreyfus - 2011 - Contemporary Buddhism 12 (1):41--54.
    This essay critiques the standard characterization of mindfulness as present-centred non-judgmental awareness, arguing that this account misses some of the central features of mindfulness as described by classical Buddhist accounts, which present mindfulness as being relevant to the past as well as to the present. I show that for these sources the central feature of mindfulness is not its present focus but its capacity to hold its object and thus allow for sustained attention, regardless of whether the object is present (...)
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  47. On Some Definitions of Mindfulness.Rupert Gethin - 2011 - Contemporary Buddhism 12 (1):263--279.
    The Buddhist technical term was first translated as ?mindfulness? by T.W. Rhys Davids in 1881. Since then various authors, including Rhys Davids, have attempted definitions of what precisely is meant by mindfulness. Initially these were based on readings and interpretations of ancient Buddhist texts. Beginning in the 1950s some definitions of mindfulness became more informed by the actual practice of meditation. In particular, Nyanaponika's definition appears to have had significant influence on the definition of mindfulness adopted by those who developed (...)
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  48. The Construction of Mindfulness.Andrew Olendzki - 2011 - Contemporary Buddhism 12 (1):55--70.
    Mindfulness is examined using the Abhidhamma system of classification of phenomena (dharmas) as found in the Pali work Abhidhammattha-sa[ndot]gaha. In this model the mental factors constituting the aggregate of formations (sa[ndot]kh?ra) are grouped so as to describe a layered approach to the practice of mental development. Thus all mental states involve a certain set of mental factors, while others are added as the training of the mind takes place. Both unwholesome and wholesome configurations also occur, and mindfulness turns out to (...)
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  49. What Kind of Free Will Did the Buddha Teach?Asaf Federman - 2010 - Philosophy East and West 60 (1):pp. 1-19.
    Recently, some contradictory statements have been made concerning whether or not the Buddha taught free will. Here, a comparative method is used to examine what exactly is meant by free will, and to determine to what extent this meaning is applicable to early Buddhist thought as recorded in the Pāli Nikāyas. The comparative method reveals parallels between contemporary criticisms of Cartesian philosophy and Buddhist criticisms of Brahmanical and Jain doctrines. Although in Cartesian terms Buddhism promotes no recognizable theory of free (...)
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  50. Vibhajja ʼa Laṅʻʺ Tanʻʺ Myāʺ.Moṅʻ Moṅʻ Krīʺ - 2010 - Loka Natʻ Cā Pe.
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1 — 50 / 149