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  1. Values in the Air: Musical Contagion, Social Appraisal and Metaphor Experience.Federico Lauria - 2023 - Proceedings of the European Society for Aesthetics 15:328-343.
    Music can infect us. In the dominant approach, music contaminates listeners through emotional mimicry and independently of value appraisal, just like when we catch other people’s feelings. Musical contagion is thus considered fatal to the mainstream view of emotions as cognitive evaluations. This paper criticizes this line of argument and proposes a new cognitivist account: the value metaphor view. Non-cognitivism relies on a contentious model of emotion transmission. In the competing model (social appraisal), we catch people’s emotions by appraising value (...)
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  2. Point d'expérience spectatorielle, point de magie- Diderot et la communication artistique géniale.Juliette Hélène Christie - manuscript
    Artwork of astounding genius requires a spectator (and not just anyone will do!). The materialist magic worked by an artistic genius only affects others; each genius is impervious to their own magic. Diderot's thought is wonderful and really deserves wider attention (if any thought really does deserve attention ...): a masterpiece is incomplete without one who can appreciate it. -/- This is a talk presented (a few years ago) to an audience of nearly none at a conference. I only post (...)
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  3. Interpreting AI-Generated Art: Arthur Danto’s Perspective on Intention, Authorship, and Creative Traditions in the Age of Artificial Intelligence.Raquel Cascales - 2023 - Polish Journal of Aesthetics 71 (4):17-29.
    Arthur C. Danto did not live to witness the proliferation of AI in artistic creation. However, his philosophy of art offers key ideas about art that can provide an interesting perspective on artwork generated by artificial intelligence (AI). In this article, I analyze how his ideas about contemporary art, intention, interpretation, and authorship could be applied to the ongoing debate about AI and artistic creation. At the same time, it is also interesting to consider whether the incorporation of AI into (...)
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  4. Art, Affectivity, and Aesthetic Value: Geiger on the Role of Emotions in Aesthetic Appreciation.Íngrid Vendrell Ferran - 2023 - Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology 10 (2):143 - 159.
    This paper explores Moritz Geiger’s work on the role of emotions in aesthetic appreciation and shows its potential for contemporary research. Drawing on the main tenets of Geiger’s phenomenological aesthetics as an aesthetics of value, the paper begins by elaborating his model of aesthetic appreciation. I argue that, placed in the contemporary debate, his model is close to affective models which make affective states responsible for the apprehension of the aesthetic value of an artwork, though Geiger also makes important concessions (...)
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  5. Autonomy and Aesthetic Valuing.Nick Riggle - forthcoming - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research (I).
    Accounts of aesthetic valuing emphasize two constraints on the formation of aesthetic belief. We must form our own aesthetic beliefs by engaging with aesthetic value first-hand (the acquaintance principle) and by using our own capacities (the autonomy principle). But why? C. Thi Nguyen’s proposal is that aesthetic valuing has an inverted structure. We often care about inquiry and engagement for the sake of having true beliefs, but in aesthetic engagement this is flipped: we care about arriving at good aesthetic beliefs (...)
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  6. Phenomenologies of the Image.Emmanuel Alloa & Cristian Ciocan - 2023 - Studia Phaenomenologica 23:9-14.
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  7. Pittura: A Gendered Template for Painting.Peg Weiser - 2023 - In The Routledge Companion to the Philosophies of Painting and Sculpture. pp. 322-336. Translated by Noel Carroll & Jonathan Gilmore.
    Why is painting unique among the visual arts? And why in the late sixteenth century did Cesare Ripa in his landmark Iconologia choose to create a distinctly female template for the act of painting? Moreover, why would a woman--Artemisia Gentileschi, among others--ever choose to paint herself as La Pittura (The Allegory of Painting)? This essay offers the thoughts of a painter-philosopher on the historic significance of the choice of topic, iconography, and gender of the most recognized allegory of Painting, namely (...)
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  8. Introduction to Design Theory Philosophy, Critique, History and Practice.Michalle Gal - 2023 - London: Routledge.
    ntroduction to Design Theory introduces a comprehensive, systematic, and didactic outline of the discourse of design. Designed both as a course book and a source for research, this textbook methodically covers the central concepts of design theory, definitions of design, its historical milestones, and its relations to culture, industry, body, ecology, language, society, gender and ideology. -/- Demonstrated by a shift towards the importance of the sociocultural context in which products are manufactured and embedded, this book showcases design theory as (...)
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  9. Turning queries into questions: For a plurality of perspectives in the age of AI and other frameworks with limited (mind)sets.Claudia Westermann & Tanu Gupta - 2023 - Technoetic Arts 21 (1):3-13.
    The editorial introduces issue 21.1 of Technoetic Arts via a critical reflection on the artificial intelligence hype (AI hype) that emerged in 2022. Tracing the history of the critique of Large Language Models, the editorial underscores that the recent calls for slowing down the development of AI, as promoted by the technology industry, do not signify a shift towards reason and considerate economics. Instead, as these calls are firmly embedded in narratives where the power to decide for the majority of (...)
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  10. Privacy, Feminism, and Moral Responsibility in the Work of Elizabeth Lane Beardsley.Julie Van Camp - 2022 - Journal of the History of Women Philosophers and Scientists 1 (1):99-114.
    I wonder why women philosophers, once recognized, too often seem to drop from the intellectual radar screen or, at least, to drop mainly to the land of footnotes and bibliographies. I consider one distinguished moral philosopher, Elizabeth Lane Beardsley, both to highlight her philosophical contributions and as a case study that suggests more widespread problems in recognizing t5he work of female philosophers and ensuring their rightful place in our professional dialogue. I consider sociological and professional factors which might partially explain (...)
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  11. Olympia's Maid: Reclaiming Black Female Subjectivity.Lorraine O'Grady - 1994 - In Joanna Frueh, Cassandra L. Langer & Arlene Raven (eds.), New Feminist Criticism: Art, Identity, Action. New York: Icon.
    This first-ever article of cultural criticism on the black female body was to prove germinal and continues to be widely referenced in scholarly and other works. Occasionally, controversial, it has been frequently anthologized, most recently in Amelia Jones, ed., The Feminism and Visual Cultural Reader, 2nd edition (Routledge, 2010). The first part of this article--delivered in a panel of the College Art Association early in 1992--was published in Afterimage 20:1 (Summer 1992). The revised version, including "Postscript," originally appeared in the (...)
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  12. Posing Modernity: The Black Model from Manet and Matisse to Today.Denise Murrell - 2018 - Yale University Press.
    This revelatory study investigates how changing modes of representing the black female figure were foundational to the development of modern art. Posing Modernity examines the legacy of Edouard Manet's Olympia (1863), arguing that this radical painting marked a fitfully evolving shift toward modernist portrayals of the black figure as an active participant in everyday life rather than as an exotic "other." Denise Murrell explores the little-known interfaces between the avant-gardists of nineteenth-century Paris and the post-abolition community of free black Parisians. (...)
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  13. Enhancing Artistic Presence through Contemplative Contextual Criticism.Peg Brand Weiser - 2006 - In Julien Robson (ed.), Presence. Louisville, KY: The Speed Art Museum. pp. 180-193.
    "Presence" is a word that can function both as a descriptor of the uniqueness, identity, and strength of an(y) identifiable, individual work of art (as used in the phrase, its "artistic presence") and, more specifically, and with a capital P, the name of a year-long exhibit consisting of a series of artworks in a uniquely created architectural environment with the Speed Art Museum in Louisville, Kentucky. In addition, as well-known art theorist Donald Preziosi points out in his 2004 essay ["Art (...)
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  14. Gendered Bodies in Contemporary Chinese Art.Mary Bittner Wiseman - 2013 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Unlimited. Indiana University Press. pp. 385-405.
    The idea of beauty in the West has often been connected with the idea of woman, whose beauty has been celebrated in sculptures of the nude since classical Greece and in paintings since the sixteenth century. the nude is not a genre in either traditional or contemporary Chinese art, however, and although there has been nakedness in the representations of the body in the contemporary art of China, its presence is marked by two characteristics that distance the Chinese naked body (...)
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  15. Beauty and the State: Female Bodies as State Apparatus and Recent Beauty Discourses in China.Eva Kit Wah Man - 2013 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Unlimited. Indiana University Press. pp. 368-384.
    The global economy has an impact on female beauty today, regardless of the multicultural and historical factors in its formation and construction, resulting in monolithic crazes in women's fashion and appearance. but female beauty in china has been greatly contested with China's turbulent modern history, and this contestation deserves serious consideration, together with the politics by which the Chinese state apparatus has promoted and regulated female beauty. I argue that certain factors have been constant in contemporary discourses of female beauty. (...)
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  16. Orientalism Inside/Out: The Art of Soody Sharifi.Cynthia Freeland - 2013 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Unlimited. Indiana University Press. pp. 347-367.
    "Orientalism" is a term made prominent by critic Edward Said in his 1978 book of that title. . . . Said specifically used the term to designate a field of self-constituted experts who proposed to explain the Orient to the West. . . . This essay explores the visual artwork of Soody Sharifi who left Iran before the Islamic Revolution of 1979, but returns to photograph women and girls. After a trip back to Iran in 1999, she began a self-portrait (...)
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  17. Beauty Wars: The Struggle over Female Modesty in the Contemporary Middle East and North Africa.Fedwa Malti-Douglas & Allen Douglas - 2013 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Unlimited. Indiana University Press. pp. 343-346.
    In the past forty years, the Muslim Middle East and North Africa have been the scene of a struggle over fashion, clothing, and makeup--over beauty. This struggle is most often seen as being about the veil or as a process of revealing. It is actually a battle between competing visions of female display., Often presented as a contest between Western modernity, on the one hand, and Islamic traditionalism, on the other, the struggle is actually between two competing forms of modernity. (...)
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  18. Feminist Art, Content, and Beauty.Keith Lehrer - 2013 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Unlimited. Indiana University Press. pp. 297-305.
    Art reconfigures experience. Art is a mentalized physical object. Danto remarks that art is embodied meaning. Hein says that feminist art chats on the edge. Our mental life is filled with meaning, but art opens the question of the meaning of experience. . . . Art, chatting on the edge of experience, nevertheless invites us to choose our stance in that world. I suggest that that is the beauty, or, at least the value, of art. The art experience presents us (...)
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  19. Seductive Shift: A Review of The Most Beautiful Woman in Gucha.Valerie Fuchs - 2013 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Unlimited. Indiana University Press. pp. 293-296.
    Breda Beban's stunning two-screen video installation, The Most Beautiful Woman in Gucha, documents a mutually seductive encounter between a beautiful belly dancer and an inebriated young man at a Romany brass band festival in Serbia. . . . With The Most Beautiful Woman in Gucha, you can have your cake and eat it too, because this cake has a whole-grain antioxidant, omega-3 excellence running through it.
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  20. Bollywood and the Feminine: Hinduism and Images of Womanhood.Jane Duran - 2013 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Unlimited. Indiana University Press. pp. 280-292.
  21. Beauty, Youth, and the Balinese Legong Dance.Stephen Davies - 2013 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Unlimited. Indiana University Press. pp. 259-279.
    In this chapterI discuss beauty and youth in Balinese dance, with special reference to Legong. Legong is the "classic" Balinese dance genre for females and is represented by Balinese to the world as the quintessence of grace, charm, and beauty in their performing arts. . . . Apparently, the notion of beauty that is invoked here is not straightforwardly equivalent to the heterosexual male norms for female sexual attractiveness, which may favor younger women but don't require them to be under (...)
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  22. Beauty between Disability and Gender: Frida Kahlo in Paper Dolls.Fedwa Malti-Douglas - 2013 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Unlimited. Indiana University Press. pp. 243-255.
    Beauty, disability, and gender crossing: The first two, though provocative, are not an altogether unexpected pair. Disability can be an object of beauty, as Anita Silvers has shown, just as it can be fetishized. Yet one more often thinks of beauty and disability as opposites. But what is gender crossing doing in this mix? Sometimes, apparently, when beauty is conjugated with disability in an atmosphere of glamour and celebrity, games with gender result. this is certainly the case with the representation (...)
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  23. Is Medical Aesthetics Really Medical?Mary Devereaux - 2013 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Unlimited. Indiana University Press. pp. 175-191.
    Medicine is the art of healing, aesthetics the study of our response to art and beauty. What happens when the two come together in the practice of cosmetic surgery? This is my question, a foray into what I will call "medical aesthetics." In what follows, I examine how practitioners of cosmetic surgery and related specialties have appropriated the language of medicine and healthcare to reframe and legitimize various nonmusical elective procedures designed to modify appearance. I being with a short discussion (...)
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  24. Worldwide Women.Eleanor Heartney - 2013 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Unlimited. Indiana University Press. pp. 126-134.
    In a season rife with related events [i.e., 2007], the Brooklyn Museum's "Global Feminisms: New Directions in Contemporary Art" is an eagerly anticipated component of a nationwide reevaluation of feminist art. It takes its place alongside the presentation of "WACK! Art and the Feminist Revolution" at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, and the installation of Judy Chicago's The Dinner Party (1974-79) and opening of the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art at the Brooklyn Museum, for which (...)
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  25. Queer Beauty: Winckelmann and Kant on the Vicissitudes of the Ideal.Whitney Davis - 2013 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Unlimited. Indiana University Press. pp. 97-125.
    The history of modern and contemporary art provides many examples of the "queering" of cultural and social norms. It has been tempting to consider this process of subversion and transgression, or "outlaw representation", as well as related performances of "camp" or other gay inflections of the dominant forms of representation, to be the most creative mode of queer cultural production. Whether or not this is true in the history of later nineteenth- and twentieth-century art, we can identify a historical process (...)
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  26. Beauty's Relational Labor.Monique Roelofs - 2013 - In Beauty Unlimited. Indiana University Press. pp. 72-95.
    I analyze the Brazilian novelist Clarice Lispector's novella, The Hour of the Star, in terms of the entwinements of beauty with economic mobility and abandonment, . . . with constructions of cultural citizenship and liminality.
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  27. Savages, Wild Men, Monstrous Races: The social Construction of Race in the Early Modern Era.Gregory Velazco Y. Trianosky - 2013 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Unlimited. Indiana University Press. pp. 45-71.
    The modern conception of race is often thought by philosophers to have developed during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in response to a unique confluence of scientific, philosophical, and imperial forces; and in recent decades some impressive work has been done to excavate the details of its construction during this period. . . . I will argue, however, that an analysis of the visual images created by Europeans during the first half-century after 1492 reveals that the essential elements of the (...)
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  28. Arthur Danto and the Problem of Beauty.Noel Carroll - 2013 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Unlimited. Indiana University Press. pp. 29-44.
    Arthur Danto's The Abuse of Beauty: Aesthetics and the Concept of Art is Danto's most recent, through-written monograph on the philosophy of art. An obvious question occasioned by its publication is: what is it intended to add to Danto's previous treatises on the philosophy of art, such as The Transfiguration of the Commonplace and After the End of Art? The simple answer, of course, is beauty. But, why, one asks, does Danto need to address beauty? . . .Danto, it seems (...)
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  29. Foreword to Beauty Unlimited.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2013 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Unlimited. Indiana University Press.
    Whatever approach one favors, the relationships between the most abstract and disembodied sense of beauty and the physical, erotic sense are clearly harder to sever than many philosophers have previously realized. The soul may be glad to forget its connection with the body, as Santayana put it, but that gladness indicates that the connection is there to be forgotten in the first place. And often it is not so much forgotten as reshaped and transfigured. Such transformations are explored here with (...)
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  30. "A New Kind of Beauty": From Classicism to Karole Armitage's Early Ballets.Sally Banes - 2000 - In Beauty Matters. Indiana University Press. pp. 266-288.
    For the generation of feminists who emerged in the 1960s and 1970s, female beauty was suspect, for it simply pandered to male desire. And for the modernist artists of that period, beauty in art had long since been banished. but for Armitage's generation, already empowered by the political gains of feminism on the one hand, and engaged in a postmodernist challenge to the values of artistic modernism on the other, beauty in art and in the female body could once again (...)
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  31. A Man Pretending to be a Woman: On Yasumasa Morimura's "Actresses".Kaori Chino - 2000 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Matters. Indiana University Press. pp. 252-265. Translated by Reiko Romii.
    The "Actresses" series by Yasumasa Morimura brutally exposes the position, attitude, or stance we assume when we see this body of work. The viewer's one-sided gaze, inflicted upon the women Morimura has impersonated, is repelled and hurled back to the viewer as the point questions: "Who are you?" and "What is your position?" You yourself, not an abstract human being, are being interrogated here. It is easy to speak lofty ideas while casting ourselves as objective transparent beings: disappearing borders, the (...)
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  32. Whose Beauty? Women, Art, and Intersubjectivity in Luce Irigaray's Writings.Hilary Robinson - 2000 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Matters. Indiana University Press. pp. 224-251.
    This essay explores the implications of Irigaray's discussion of the concept "beauty" . . . Her writings indicate moments of strategic or structural possibility from which women can create beauties appropriate to their subjectivities, and outline how becoming subjects, women, and mediating the resultant subjectivity is in itself to create beauty. Although in Western culture the Symbolic has a phallocentric syntax and what is read as beauty of body and beauty in art are products of phallocentric structures, nonetheless moments of (...)
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  33. Miss America: Whose Ideal?Dawn Perlmutter - 2000 - In Beauty Matters. Indiana University Press. pp. 155-168.
    Although it may appear that the Miss America Pageant is responsible for breaking down class barriers, the fact is that the pageant was always governed by upper-class patriarchal values of what constitutes the proper woman. . . . [it] fosters sexist practices, and exploits, commodities, and objectifies women and girls; consider the case of the murdered JonBenet Ramsey--who competed in children's beauty pageants at age six. If there is still any question in your mind about how deeply ingrained Miss American (...)
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  34. Beauty (Re)Discovers the Male Body.Susan Bordo - 2000 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Matters. Indiana University Press. pp. 112-154.
    Putting classical art to the side for the moment, the naked and near-naked female body became an object of mainstream consumption first in Playboy and its imitators, then in movies, and only then in fashion photographs. With the male body, the trajectory has been different. Fashion has taken the lead, the movies have followed. Hollywood may have been a chest-fest in the fifties, but it was male clothing designers [e.g., Calvin Klein] who went south and violated the really powerful taboos--not (...)
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  35. Beauty and Its Kitsch Competitors.Kathleen M. Higgins - 2000 - In Beauty Matters. Indiana University Press. pp. 87-111.
    One of the reasons for the disappearance of beauty in the artistic ideology of the late twentieth century has been the seeming similarity of beauty to certain kinds of kitsch. Beauty has also been associated with flawlessness and with glamour. I will content that the flawless and the glamorous are actually categories of kitsch, and that the dominance of these images in marketing has contributed to our societal tendency to confuse them with beauty. The quests for flawlessness and glamour are (...)
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  36. Beauty and Beautification.Arthur C. Danto - 2000 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Matters. Indiana University Press. pp. 65-83.
    Hegel has identified what I have preemptively designated a third aesthetic realm--in addition to natural beauty and artistic beauty--one greatly connected with human life . . . art applied to the enhancement of life . . . But the other border of what I shall designate the Third Realm is equally non-exclusionary, especially when we consider what Hegel singles out under the head of beautiful people--the kind of beauty possessed by Helen of Troy, say, which we must suppose a wonder (...)
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  37. Malcolm's Conk and Danto's Colors; or, Four Logical Petitions Concerning race, Beauty, and Aesthetics.Paul C. Taylor - 2000 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Matters. Indiana University Press. pp. 57-64.
    In this essay I want to consider how Penola's (character in Toni Morrison's novel, The Bluest Eye) circumstance es motivate her petition--"asking for beauty"--and two others, after which I will offer my own petition concerning the practice of aesthetics.
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  38. Ethnicity, Race, and Monstrosity: The Rhetorics of Horror and Humor.Noel Carroll - 2000 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Matters. Indiana University Press. pp. 37-56.
    In this essay, I am concerned with the representation of groups in popular culture. My interest has to do with the politics of representing people. The couplet beauty/nonbeauty (or, more specifically, beauty/ugliness) frequently figures importantly in the representation of groups, including most notably, for my purposes, ethnic and racial minorities. This couplet can be politically significant because beauty is often associated in our culture with moral goodness. . . . Thus, beauty and non beauty can serve as a basis for (...)
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  39. Kantian and Contextual Beauty.Marcia M. Eaton - 2000 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Matters. Indiana University Press. pp. 27-36.
    To a great extent, Kant more than Tolstoy influenced twentieth-century aesthetics in Eurocentric cultures. Formalist theorists insisted that disinterested apprehension of directly perceivable properties (color, rhythm, meter, balance, proportion, etc.) distinguished aesthetic experiences from all others. Kant never won the day in many non-Eurocentric cultures, however. Native Americans, for example, continued to connect aesthetic activity directly to "interested" and functional objects and events. Decriptions of objects or events as "beautiful" in most African cultures never required distinguishing "What is it for?" (...)
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  40. Foreword: Cutting Two Ways with Beauty.Eleanor Heartney - 2000 - In Peg Brand Weiser (ed.), Beauty Matters. Indiana University Press.
    Beauty is a contested category today because we both long for and fear its seductions. The essays in this volume interrogate beauty in all its complexity. But whether they construe it as friend or foe, they make it clear that beauty, and our preoccupation with it, cannot be wished away. deeply embedded in that inchoate matter from which our judgments of value are formed, beauty is inseparable from all that is best and worst in human experience.
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  41. The Role of Feminist Aesthetics in Feminist Theory.Hilde Hein - 1995 - In Peg Brand Weiser & Carolyn Korsmeyer (eds.), Feminism and Tradition in Aesthetics. Penn State University Press. pp. 446-463.
    "Isms" can be misleading. . . . Whether negatively or positively intended, the terminal identification--the "ism"--bestows significance upon a category that may never have existed as a concept prior to the viral appendage of its "ism." "Feminism" is a word that expresses such semantic innovation. . . . Feminist aesthetics may well be the prologue of feminist theory understood more broadly. I shall argue that this is the case and that, indeed, feminist theory is at present hindered by the lack (...)
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  42. Why Feminism Doesn't Need an Aesthetic (And Why It Can't Ignore Aesthetics).Rita Felski - 1995 - In Peg Brand Weiser & Carolyn Korsmeyer (eds.), Feminism and Tradition in Aesthetics. Penn State University Press. pp. 431-445.
    In this paper I shall develop further my view that we need to go "beyond feminist aesthetics" by examining some of the difficulties of such a concept, drawing specific examples from the areas of both literature and the fine arts. More controversially, perhaps, I shall suggest that although feminist criticism does not need an (autonomous) aesthetic, it cannot afford to ignore the realm of the aesthetic, because it is necessarily implicated within and influenced by its institutional and discursive logics.
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  43. Reconciling Analytic and Feminist Philosophy and Aesthetics.Joseph Margolis - 1995 - In Peg Brand Weiser & Carolyn Korsmeyer (eds.), Feminism and Tradition in Aesthetics. Penn State University Press. pp. 416-430.
    ...I must say at once that the grammatical position of "feminist" in the expression "feminist aesthetics" is in even greater danger of generating confusion than the use of "analytic" [n the phrase, "analytic aesthetics"]. I have been utterly unable to discern in the feminist literature any homogeneous philosophical practice, substantive claim, or method of working that could, more or less disjunctively, be called feminist, that compared favorably (in the recognitional sense) with the more convergent literature of analytic aesthetics--except, of course, (...)
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  44. Analytic Aesthetics and Feminist Aesthetics: Neither/Nor?Joanne B. Waugh - 1995 - In Peg Brand Weiser & Carolyn Korsmeyer (eds.), Feminism and Tradition in Aesthetics. Penn State University Press. pp. 399-415.
    Analytic and feminist philosophers already uncomfortable with the practice of devoting special sessions at meetings and special issues of journals to "feminist aesthetics" may find that this piece adds to their uneasiness. If "feminist aesthetics" is treated as a special topic within aesthetics, then should we infer that the rest of the time we do masculine aesthetics? some feminists would argue for an affirmative answer to this question; the title acknowledges them in insinuating that if analytic aesthetics is not feminist (...)
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  45. The Image of Women in Film: A Defense of a Paradigm.Noel Carroll - 1995 - In Peg Brand Weiser & Carolyn Korsmeyer (eds.), Feminism and Tradition in Aesthetics. Penn State University Press. pp. 371-391.
    Feminism is the most visible movement in film criticism today, and the most dominant trend in that movement is psychoanalytically informed. Psychoanalytic feminism came to this position in film studies at the very latest by the early to mid-1980s. Before the consolidation and ascendancy of this particular variety of feminism, earlier approaches to the study of women and film included the search for a suppressed canon of women filmmakers--a feminist version of the auteur theory--and the study of the image of (...)
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  46. Mothers and Daughters: Ancient and Modern Myths.Ellen Handler Spitz - 1995 - In Peg Brand Weiser & Carolyn Korsmeyer (eds.), Feminism and Tradition in Aesthetics. Penn State University Press. pp. 354-370.
    Psychoanalysis has tended, in its discussions of the entanglements between women, to weight negative aspects--recalcitrant guilt, envy, and rage. This essay seeks to redistribute that balance by adding to the scales a goodly measure of the strength that derives from female-to female intergenerational bonding. The following pages are dedicated to one regal grandmother, two wise daughters, a stepmother who never quite realized that she had become a real mother, and a very real mother who died too young but whose articulate (...)
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  47. Leonardo da vinci and Creative Female Nature.Mary D. Garrard - 1995 - In Peg Brand Weiser & Carolyn Korsmeyer (eds.), Feminism and Tradition in Aesthetics. Penn State University Press. pp. 326-353.
    Possibly the most celebrated artist of all time, Leonardo da vinci has been examined from every conceivable perspective except a feminist one. A feminist perspective seeks, of course, not only to include women in history but also to expose gender-based conceptual biases that have distorted scholarship. Such a bias has led scholars to ignore an important dimension of Leonardo's art and thought: his unusual valorization of the feminine in a period when the female sex was disparaged, both socially and philosophically. (...)
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  48. Has Her(one's) Time Now Come?Anita Silvers - 1995 - In Peg Brand Weiser & Carolyn Korsmeyer (eds.), Feminism and Tradition in Aesthetics. Penn State University Press. pp. 279-304.
    Artemisia Gentileschi (c. 1593-1652) was well paid and highly thought of as a painter by some of the leading art patrons of the Europe of her time. In other words, in her own time she was a socially acceptable, successful artist. Yet, subsequently, the shadow of obscurity fell over her. Only about thirty paintings, from what must have been a much greater body of work, have been identified and attributed to her. Moreover, relatively little has been written about her, and (...)
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  49. Monologues from "Four Intruders Plus Alarm Systems" and "Safe".Adrian Piper - 1995 - In Peg Brand Weiser & Carolyn Korsmeyer (eds.), Feminism and Tradition in Aesthetics. Penn State University Press. pp. 235-244.
    Editor's note: Adrian Piper is a conceptual artist whose work from the past twenty-five years has included performances, graphic art, and installation pieces. Always provocative, Piper seeks to challenge viewers' assumptions about the nature of art, aesthetic response, and modes of evaluating by creating art that involves issues of gender and race. Piper uses political art to confront viewers with emotionally charged environments that preclude our maintaining a safe, aesthetically distanced stance toward the subject matter. being forced to confront our (...)
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  50. Interweaving Feminist Frameworks.Beth Ann Dobie - 1995 - In Peg Brand Weiser & Carolyn Korsmeyer (eds.), Feminism and Tradition in Aesthetics. Penn State University Press. pp. 215-234.
    When interpreting works of art, there are many available le theoretical perspectives to which one can appeal. One factor that may influence the choice is what issues are present in the work on wishes to address. In discussing the artwork of Nancy Spiro, I shall illustrate how all three frameworks of sexual difference--experiential difference, positional difference in discourse, and difference as psychoanalysis--can be employed in critiquing works of art. After discussing Spero's work, I shall show how the perspectives can be (...)
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