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  1. Lars Aagaard-Mogensen (1982). Arts and Ends. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 41 (2):215-217.
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  2. Laurie Adams (2002). Exploring Art.
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  3. Visual Arts Development Agency (1996). Future Landscapes, New Partnerships Art and the Landscape. Visual Arts Development Agency.
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  4. Virgil Aldrich (1986). Hugo A. Meynell, The Nature of Aesthetic Value. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 6:348-350.
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  5. Virgil C. Aldrich (1986). Hugo A. Meynell, The Nature of Aesthetic Value Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 6 (7):348-350.
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  6. Derek Allan, Analytic Aesthetics and the Dilemma of Timelessness.
    Explores the failure of analytic aesthetics to examine the question of the capacity of art to transcend time, and its own commitment – seldom explicitly acknowledged – to the assumption that this capacity functions through the traditional, but no longer viable, notion of timelessness inherited from Enlightenment aesthetics.
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  7. R. T. Allen (1976). The State and Civil Society as Objects of Aesthetic Appreciation. British Journal of Aesthetics 16 (3):237-242.
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  8. Emmanuel Alloa & Adnen Jdey (2012). Du sensible à l'oeuvre. Esthétiques de Merleau-Ponty. La lettre volée.
    Plusieurs générations de chercheurs internationaux interrogent l’esthétique de Merleau-Ponty suivant deux axes : d’une part, le dialogue constant et passionné avec des arts (peinture, littérature, cinéma) et ses protagonistes (Cézanne, Proust, Claude Simon) qui est à l’origine de l’esthétique de Merleau-Ponty, et dans d’autre part, l’impact de la pensée merleau-pontienne sur les arts, depuis le Minimal Art américain en passant par le Body Art et la danse contemporaine. Tandis que certaines contributions s’intéressent, en s’appuyant sur les inédits, au rapport jusqu’ici (...)
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  9. Mulk Raj Anand (1963). The Third Eye a Lecture on the Appreciation of Art. Published for the University of Punjab by D.C. Sharma.
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  10. James C. Anderson (1982). Rethinking Aesthetic Appreciation. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 41 (1):97-98.
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  11. John Armstrong (1996). Looking at Pictures an Introduction to the Appreciation of Art.
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  12. Paloma Atencia-Linares (2014). Aesthetic Essays, by Malcolm Budd. [REVIEW] Mind 123 (491):876-879.
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  13. Franz Bäuml (1979). “Kudrun”: A Critical Appreciation. [REVIEW] Speculum 54 (4):787-789.
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  14. Vicki Berger & Isabel Vasseur (1997). Arcadia Revisited the Place of Landscape.
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  15. A. Berleant (1978). Aesthetic Paradigms for an Urban Ecology. Diogenes 26 (103):1-28.
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  16. Arnold Berleant (1964). A Note on the Problem on Defining `Art'. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 25 (2):239-241.
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  17. William L. Blizek (1973). "Aesthetics: An Introduction," by George Dickie. Modern Schoolman 50 (4):385-387.
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  18. G. Bohme & J. Farrell (1992). An Aesthetic Theory of Nature: An Interim Report. Thesis Eleven 32 (1):90-102.
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  19. Erin Bradfield (2014). Alessandro Giovannelli , Aesthetics: The Key Thinkers . Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 34 (5):227-230.
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  20. Emily Brady (2010). Aesthetics and Nature. British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (1):114-117.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  21. Emily Brady (2006). The Aesthetics of Agricultural Landscapes and the Relationship Between Humans and Nature. Ethics, Place and Environment 9 (1):1 – 19.
    The continuum between nature and artefact is occupied by objects and environments that embody a relationship between natural processes and human activity. In this paper, I explore the relationship that emerges through human interaction with the land in the generation and aesthetic appreciation of industrial farming in contrast to more traditional agricultural practices. I consider the concept of a dialectical relationship and develop it in order to characterise the distinctive synthesising activity of humans and nature which underlies cultivated environments. I (...)
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  22. Isis Brook (2011). 9 Reinterpreting the Picturesque in the Experience of Landscape. In Jeff Malpas (ed.), The Place of Landscape: Concepts, Contexts, Studies. MIT Press. pp. 165.
    This chapter discusses the concept of the picturesque in the sense of admiring nature as “picture-like” and, consequently, inauthentic. A contrasting view regarding the interpretation of the picturesque, which is more acquiescent to the contemporary love of wildness and environmental philosophy, is presented and explored through the works of Price and Watelet. In reassessing the picturesque, six themes are identified in their works, namely, variety, intricacy, engagement, time, chance, and transition. This alternative view of the picturesque shows that, contrary to (...)
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  23. Isis Brook & Emily Brady (2003). Topiary: Ethics and Aesthetics. Ethics and the Environment 8 (1):127-142.
    : In this paper we discuss ethical and aesthetic questions in relation to the gardening practice of topiary. We begin by considering the ethical concerns arising from the uneasiness some appreciators might feel when experiencing topiary as a manipulation or contortion of natural processes. We then turn to ways in which topiary might cause an 'aesthetic affront' through the humanizing effects of sentimentality and falsification of nature (most often found in representational rather than abstract topiary). Our contention is that successful (...)
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  24. Brian Bruya (2003). Li Zehou's Aesthetics as a Marxist Philosophy of Freedom. Dialogue and Universalism 13 (11-12):133-140.
    After being largely unknown to non-siniphone philosophers, Li Zehou's ideas are gradually being translated into English, but very little has been done on his aesthetics, which he says is the key to his oeuvre. In the first of three sections of this paper, I briefly introduce the reader to Kant's aesthetics through Li's eyes, in which he develops an implicit notion of aesthetic freedom as political vehicle through the notions of subjectivity, universalization, and the unity of the cognitive faculties. In (...)
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  25. Brian Bruya (2002). Chaos as the Inchoate: The Early Chinese Aesthetic of Spontaneity. In Grazia Marchianò (ed.), Aesthetics & Chaos: Investigating a Creative Complicity.
    Can we conceive of disorder in a positive sense? We organize our desks, we discipline our children, we govern our polities--all with the aim of reducing disorder, of temporarily reversing the entropy that inevitably asserts itself in our lives. Going all the way back to Hesiod, we see chaos as a cosmogonic state of utter confusion inevitably reigned in by laws of regularity, in a transition from fearful unpredictability to calm stability. In contrast to a similar early Chinese notion of (...)
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  26. Brian James Bruya (2004). Aesthetic Spontaneity: A Theory of Action Based on Affective Responsiveness. Dissertation, University of Hawai'i
    This dissertation is an attempt to analyze an indigenous concept of early Chinese Philosophy in its own context, interpreting it outside of a contemporary Western philosophical framework , then to comb the history of Western philosophy for related concepts, in order to finally enrich the contemporary philosophical landscape by incorporating this concept through a useful and familiar set of conceptual tools. ;The concept in question is ziran, rendered spontaneity, a central notion of early Chinese philosophy but one that has not (...)
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  27. Malcolm Budd (2005). Aesthetics of Nature. In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Aesthetics. Oxford University Press.
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  28. Allen Carlson (2006). The Aesthetic Appreciation of Environmental Architecture Under Different Conceptions of Environment. Journal of Aesthetic Education 40 (4):77-88.
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  29. Allen Carlson (1997). On the Aesthetic Appreciation of Japanese Gardens. British Journal of Aesthetics 37 (1):47-56.
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  30. Allen Carlson (1985). On Appreciating Agricultural Landscapes. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 43 (3):301-312.
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  31. Allen Carlson & Arnold Berleant (2004). Introduction: The Aesthetics of Nature. In Allen Carlson & Arnold Berleant (eds.), The Aesthetics of Natural Environments. Broadview Press. pp. 11--42.
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  32. Noël Carroll & John Gibson (eds.) (2011). Narrative, Emotion, and Insight. Pennsylvania State University Press.
    While narrative has been one of the liveliest and most productive areas of research in literary theory, discussions of the nature of emotional responses to art and of the cognitive value of art tend to concentrate almost exclusively on the problem of fiction: How can we emote over or learn from fictions? _Narrative, Emotion, and Insight _explores what would happen if aestheticians framed the matter differently, having narratives—rather than fictional characters and events—as the object of emotional and cognitive attention. The (...)
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  33. Rachel Carroll, What Kind of Relationship with Nature Does Art Provide?
    The relationship with nature through art has been explored as a two fold bond. The first considers a relationship with nature via art and science, where the history and contemporary application of scientific illustration in art is explored; while the second explores past and present connections with nature via art and the landscape, particularly the panoramic tradition. Historically these relationships have predominately been about dominating nature, mans dominion over the land. Science was seen as the only authority, while our relationships (...)
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  34. C. L. Carter (2013). Philosophy and Art: Changing Landscapes for Aesthetics. Diogenes 59 (1-2):84-100.
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  35. Curtis Carter, Philosophy and Art: Changing Landscapes for Aesthetics.
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  36. Tomás N. Castro & Maribel Mendes Sobreira (eds.) (2016). Philosophy & Architecture. Centro de Filosofia da Universidade de Lisboa.
    Philosophy & Architecture special number of philosophy@LISBON (International eJournal) 5 | 2016 edited by Tomás N. Castro with Maribel Mendes Sobreira Centro de Filosofia da Universidade de Lisboa ISSN 2182-4371.
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  37. Clive Cazeaux (2012). Sensation as Participation in Visual Art. Aesthetic Pathways 2 (2):2-30.
    Can an understanding be formed of how sensory experience might be presented or manipulated in visual art in order to promote a relational concept of the senses, in opposition to the customary, capitalist notion of sensation as a private possession, as a sensory impression that is mine? I ask the question in the light of recent visual art theory and practice which pursue relational, ecological ambitions. As Arnold Berleant, Nicolas Bourriaud, and Grant Kester see it, ecological ambition and artistic form (...)
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  38. Douglas Chambers (1999). The View From Wooburn Farm Looking Out/Looking In.
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  39. Ralph W. Church (1939). An Essay on Critical Appreciation. Philosophical Review 48 (6):638-640.
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  40. David Cooper (2002). The Reach of the Aesthetic: Collected Essays on Art and Nature. [REVIEW] Philosophy 77 (2):283-296.
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  41. Vaughan Cornish (1931). The Poetic Impression of Natural Scenery. Sifton, Praed & Co..
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  42. Martha Cornog (2007). Vern Bullough: An Appreciation. Free Inquiry 27:49-50.
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  43. Donald Crawford (2004). Scenery and the Aesthetics of Nature. In Allen Carlson & Arnold Berleant (eds.), The Aesthetics of Natural Environments. Broadview Press. pp. 253--68.
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  44. Fiona Crisp, Hamish Fulton & Laure Prouvost, -Scape: Constructing Nature.
    There is a common expectation that as the landscape contains nature, then it is a natural thing. Yet, it is difficult to find a time when this has really been the case. It is frequently co-opted as part of the imagination of what landscape could, and ideally should, be. It can be a difficult thing to ‘read’. The three artists in –scape explore some of the diversions, delusions – as well as the delights - of the constructed landscape. In doing (...)
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  45. S. Davies, R. Hopkins, J. Robinson & S. Lintott (2004). The Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature. British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (3):301-315.
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  46. Stephen Davies (2014). Art and Aesthetic Behaviors as Possible Expressions of Our Biologically Evolved Human Nature. Philosophy Compass 9 (6):361-367.
    In this paper, I review arguments that have been offered in favor of the view that humans' art and/or aesthetic behaviors are (in part) a product of our biologically evolved human nature, either as adaptations in their own right or as incidental byproducts of adaptations with non-art and non-aesthetic functions. I present an overview of the main positions and options, critically evaluate their strengths and weaknesses, and outline their presuppositions.
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  47. Anne De Charmant (1997). Art & the Garden Travels in the Contemporary Mindscape.
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  48. Nicole Dołowy-Rybińska (2013). The Europe of Minorities. Cultural Landscapes and Ethnic Boundaries. Art Inquiry. Recherches Sur les Arts 15:125-138.
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  49. Susannah C. Drake (2010). Term. Definition. Identity Regenerating Landscape Architecture in the Era of Landscape Urbanism. Topos 71:50.
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  50. I. E. & R. W. Church (1939). An Essay on Critical Appreciation. Journal of Philosophy 36 (15):416.
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