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  1. Oxford Handbook of Consequentialism.Douglas W. Portmore (ed.) - forthcoming - New York, USA: Oxford University Press.
    This handbook will contain approximately thirty previously unpublished contributions by important philosophers, covering what’s happening in the field of consequentialism today and pointing to new directions for future research.
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  2. Allan Gibbard, Reconciling Our Aims: In Search of Bases for Ethics , Pp. Viii + 216.Brian Mcelwee - 2012 - Utilitas 24 (4):563-566.
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  3. What's the Point of Self-Consciousness? A Critique of Singer's Arguments Against Killing Self-Conscious Animals.Federico Zuolo - 2016 - Utilitas 28 (4):465-487.
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  4. Book Reviews Portmore , Douglas . Commonsense Consequentialism: Wherein Morality Meets Rationality Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. Pp. 266. $74.00 (Paper). [REVIEW]Frances Howard-Snyder - 2012 - Ethics 123 (1):179-183.
  5. Good, Good For, and Good Relative To: Relative and Relational in Value Theory.Fritz-Anton Fritzson - 2016 - Philosophy 91 (2):255-267.
    This paper discusses how we are to understand claims to the effect that something is good relative to a person. It is argued that goodness relative to should not be equated with good for as the latter is a relational value notion and the former is a value theoretical notion. It is argued further that good relative to a person should be understood as good from the perspective or the point of view of the person. But this analysis of the (...)
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  6. Impartiality and Associative Duties: David O. Brink.David O. Brink - 2001 - Utilitas 13 (2):152-172.
    Consequentialism is often criticized for failing to accommodate impersonal constraints and personal options. A common consequentialist response is to acknowledge the anticonsequentialist intuitions but to argue either that the consequentialist can, after all, accommodate the allegedly recalcitrant intuitions or that, where accommodation is impossible, the recalcitrant intuition can be dismissed for want of an adequate philosophical rationale. Whereas these consequentialist responses have some plausibility, associational duties represent a somewhat different challenge to consequentialism, inasmuch as they embody neither impersonal constraints nor (...)
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  7. On Life, Death, and Abortion: D. W. Haslett.D. W. Haslett - 1996 - Utilitas 8 (2):159-189.
    Morally speaking, is abortion murder? This is what I am calling the ‘abortion problem’. I claim that neither pro-life nor pro-choice advocates have the correct solution; that the correct solution is instead one considered correct by relatively few people. But if this solution really is correct, then why, after years of intense debate, is this solution not more widely accepted? Many, no doubt, are precluded from accepting it by religious dogma. But others, I think, fail to arrive at a correct (...)
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  8. Could Kant Have Been A Utilitarian?*: R. M. Hare.R. M. Hare - 1993 - Utilitas 5 (1):1-16.
    … the supreme end, the happiness of all mankind. The law concerning punishment is a Categorical Imperative; and woe to him who rummages around in the winding paths of a theory of happiness, looking for some advantage to be gained by releasing the criminal from punishment or by reducing the amount of it.
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  9. Astronomical Waste: The Opportunity Cost of Delayed Technological Development: Nick Bostrom.Nick Bostrom - 2003 - Utilitas 15 (3):308-314.
    With very advanced technology, a very large population of people living happy lives could be sustained in the accessible region of the universe. For every year that development of such technologies and colonization of the universe is delayed, there is therefore a corresponding opportunity cost: a potential good, lives worth living, is not being realized. Given some plausible assumptions, this cost is extremely large. However, the lesson for standard utilitarians is not that we ought to maximize the pace of technological (...)
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  10. Jevons's Applications of Utilitarian Theory to Economic Policy*: Sandra J. Peart.Sandra J. Peart - 1990 - Utilitas 2 (2):281-306.
    The precise nature of W. S. Jevons's utilitarianism as a guiding rule for economic policy has yet to be investigated, and that will be the first issue treated in this paper. While J. A. Schumpeter, for instance, asserted that ‘some of the most prominent exponents of marginal utility’, were ‘convinced utilitarians’, he did not investigate the further implications for Jevons's policy analysis.
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  11. Benefit Versus Numbers Versus Helping the Worst-Off: An Alternative to the Prevalent Approach to the Just Distribution of Resources.Andrew Stark - 2008 - Utilitas 20 (3):356-382.
    A central strand in philosophical debate over the just distribution of resources attempts to juggle three competing imperatives: helping those who are worst off, helping those who will benefit the most, and then – beyond this – determining when to aggregate such ‘worst off’ and ‘benefit’ claims, and when instead to treat no such claim as greater than that which any individual by herself can exert. Yet as various philosophers have observed, ‘we have no satisfactory theoretical characterization’ as to how (...)
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  12. More on Bentham on Utility and Rights: P. J. Kelly.P. J. Kelly - 1998 - Utilitas 10 (2):165-167.
    This paper examines Rosen's claim that Bentham's principle of utility was a distributive rather than an aggregative principle.
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  13. Is It Rational to Maximize?: James Wood Bailey.James Wood Bailey - 1998 - Utilitas 10 (2):195-221.
    Most versions of utilitarianism depend on the plausibility and coherence of some conceptionof maximizing well-being, but these conceptions have been attacked on various grounds. This paper considers two such contentions. First, it addresses the argument that because goods are plural and incommensurable, maximization is incoherent. It is shown that any conception of incommensurability strong enough to show the incoherence of maximization leads to an intolerable paradox. Several misunderstandings of what maximization requires are also addressed. Second, this paper responds to the (...)
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  14. The Distinction Between Criterion and Decision Procedure: A Reply to Madison Powers: James Griffin.James Griffin - 1994 - Utilitas 6 (2):177-182.
    Madison Powers raises the difficult problem of repugnant desires. The problem is not only difficult but pervasive, more pervasive even than Powers says. He notes that it affects hedonist, eudaimonist, and desire-fulfilment forms of utilitarianism; but it also affects the form of utilitarianism that uses a list of irreducibly plural values, so long as one of the values on the list is pleasure or happiness, and it can affect non-utilitarian positions as well for the same reason.
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  15. Choice and Consequentialism.Germain Grisez - 1977 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 51:144.
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  16. The Irrationality of the Good.C. E. M. Joad - 1926 - Journal of Philosophical Studies 1 (4):497-506.
    The theories of most writers on Ethics, with whose works I am acquainted, appear to be based upon the assumption of the unique character of goodness or The Good. By the word unique these writers mean, I think, among other things that goodness cannot be analysed into or described in terms of anything other than itself, that it can be and is desired for its own sake and not for the sake of some other thing which is not goodness, and (...)
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  17. What's Good on Tv.Robert Arp - 2011 - Wiley.
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  18. Two Theories of the Good: L. W. SUMNER.L. W. Sumner - 1992 - Social Philosophy and Policy 9 (2):1-14.
    Suppose that the ultimate point of ethics is to make the world a better place. If it is, we must face the question: better in what respect? If the good is prior to the right — that is, if the rationale for all requirements of the right is that they serve to further the good in one way or another — then what is this good? Is there a single fundamental value capable of underlying and unifying all of our moral (...)
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  19. "It Is Not Good for God to Be Alone": Monism Versus Trinitarianism.Joyce Little - 2000 - The Chesterton Review 26 (1/2):95-115.
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  20. The “Good War”: WW II and the Displacement of Community in America.Allan Carlson - 2008 - The Chesterton Review 34 (1/2):147-161.
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  21. Christianity and Consequentialism: A Reply to Meilaender.James A. Keller - 1989 - Faith and Philosophy 6 (2):198-206.
    In a recent paper, Gilbert Meilaender argues that Christian ethics must not be consequentialist. Though Meilaender does indicate some problems which may exist with certain consequentialist theories, those problems do not exclude all types of consequentialist theories from consideration as Christian ethical theories. A consequentialism like R. M. Hare’s offers virtually all the advantages Meilaender claims for his Christian deontological view. Moreover. Meilaender has overlooked certain advantages of consequentialism and certain disadvantages of the sort of deontological theory he espouses.
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  22. Can We Be Good Without God?: Biology, Behavior, and the Need to Believe. [REVIEW]Mark Wynn - 2005 - International Philosophical Quarterly 45 (1):119-120.
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  23. “If You Can’T Be Good, Be Careful”: Response to Scholar’s Session.Kelly Oliver - 2011 - Philosophy Today 55 (Supplement):47-55.
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  24. Incoherence and Consequentialism : A Rejoinder.Joseph Boyle, Germain Grisez & John Finnis - 1990 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 64 (2):271-277.
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  25. Ethics.Frank Chapman Sharp - 1928 - Century Co..
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  26. The Good as Good Will.C. Fox - 1925 - Australasian Journal of Psychology and Philosophy 3 (1):12-23.
  27. Might Anything Be Plain Good?Thomas Byrne - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (12):3335-3346.
    G.E. Moore said that rightness was obviously a matter of maximising plain goodness. Peter Geach and Judith Thomson disagree. They have both argued that ‘good’ is not a predicative adjective, but only ever an attributive adjective: just like ‘big.’ And just as there is no such thing as plain bigness but only ever big for or as a so-and-so, there is also no such thing as plain goodness. They conclude that Moore’s goodness is thus a nonsense. However attention has been (...)
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  28. Good Athlete, Good Person?Dustin Nelson - 2016 - Southwest Philosophy Review 32 (2):69-71.
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  29. The Good Will: A Study in the Coherence Theory of Goodness.Alex J. D. Porteous - 1929 - Philosophical Review 38 (1):78.
  30. Are There Organic Unities?Jonathan Dancy - unknown
    Argues against G. E. Moore’s conception of organic unities, attempting to replace it with a conception more amenable to particularism. Considers the possibility of a form of default value acceptable to particularism. Ends by contrasting the views expressed here with those of Kagan.
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  31. Susan Wolf: Meaning in Life and Why It Matters.Markus Rüther - 2011 - Philosophischer Literaturanzeiger 64 (3):308-313.
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  32. The Good and the Right.L. W. Sumner - 1979 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 9 (sup1):99-114.
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  33. Consequentialism and Preference Formation in Economics and Game Theory.Daniel M. Hausman - 2006 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 59:111-130.
    When students first study expected utility, they are inclined to interpret it as a theory that explains preferences for lotteries in terms of preferences for outcomes. Knowing U and U, the agent can calculate that the utility of a gamble of $100 on a fair coin coming up heads is U/2 + U/2. Utilities are indices representing preferences, so in calculating the utility of the gamble, one is apparently giving a causal explanation for the agent’s preference for the gamble.
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  34. IX.—The Good and the Right.M. C. D'Arcy - 1931 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 32 (1):171-206.
  35. The Supererogatory and How Not To Accommodate It: A Reply to Dorsey.Alfred Archer - 2016 - Utilitas 28 (2):179-188.
    It is plausible to think that there exist acts of supererogation. It also seems plausible that there is a close connection between what we are morally required to do and what it would be morally good to do. Despite being independently plausible these two claims are hard to reconcile. My aim in this article will be to respond to a recent solution to this puzzle proposed by Dale Dorsey. Dorsey's solution to this problem is to posit a new account of (...)
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  36. Toward an Axiological Virtue Ethics.Rem B. Edwards - 2013 - Ethical Research 3 (3):21-48.
    This article introduces Formal Axiology, first developed by Robert S. Hartman, and explains its essential features—a formal definition of “good” (the “Form of the Good”), three basic kinds of value and evaluation—systemic, extrinsic, and intrinsic, and the hierarchy of value according to which good things having the richest quantity and quality of good-making properties are better than those having less. Formal Axiology is extended into moral philosophy by applying the Form of the Good to persons and showing how this culminates (...)
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  37. Two Preference Metrics Provide Settings for the Study of Properties of Binary Relations.Vicki Knoblauch - 2015 - Theory and Decision 79 (4):615-625.
    The topological structures imposed on the collection of binary relations on a given set by the symmetric difference metric and the Hausdorff metric provide opportunities for learning about how collections of binary relations with various properties fit into the collection of all binary relations. For example, there is some agreement and some disagreement between conclusions drawn about the rarity of certain properties of binary relations using first the symmetric difference metric and then the Hausdorff metric.
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  38. I.—The Right and the Good.A. E. Taylor - 1939 - Mind 48 (191):273-301.
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  39. The Goodness of Producing and the Good Produced.A. Boyce Gibson - 1940 - Australasian Journal of Psychology and Philosophy 18 (3):232-245.
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  40. The Numbers Problem.Nien-hê Hsieh, Alan Strudler & David Wasserman - 2006 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 34 (4):352-372.
  41. Weighing Goods: Some Questions and Comments.Larry S. Temkin - 1994 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 23 (4):350-380.
  42. Reading Parfit.Jonathan Dancy (ed.) - 1997 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    _ Reading Parfit _ brings together some of the most distinguished scholars in the field to discuss and critique Derek Parfit's outstanding work, _ Reasons and Persons, _.
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  43. Hypothetical Choice, Egalitarianism and the Separateness of Persons.Keith D. Hyams - 2015 - Utilitas 27 (2):217-239.
    Luck egalitarians claim that disadvantage is worse when it emerges from an unchosen risk than when it emerges from a chosen risk. I argue that disadvantage is also worse when it emerges from an unchosen risk that the disadvantaged agent would have declined to take, had he or she been able to do so, than when it emerges from an unchosen risk that the disadvantaged agent would not have declined to take. Such a view is significant because it allows both (...)
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  44. Chapter 4. Capacity-Fulfillment and the Good Life.Alan Gewirth - 2009 - In Self-Fulfillment. Princeton University Press. pp. 107-158.
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  45. Good for Us.Trevor Curnow - 2004 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 24 (1):69-70.
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  46. Art What is It Good For?Dolan Cummings & Institute of Ideas - 2002
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  47. Good Without God, is It Possible?Jasper Benjamin Hunt - 1907
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  48. Be Good to Yourself.Orison Swett Marden - 1914
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  49. Interests, Utilitarianism and Moral Standing.Dan Egonsson - 1990
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  50. The Right and the Good.Elliot Nelson Dorff - 1971 - Dissertation, Columbia University
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