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  1. Happiness Surveys and Public Policy: What's the Use?Matthew D. Adler - unknown
    This Article provides a comprehensive, critical overview of proposals to use happiness surveys for steering public policy. Happiness or “subjective well-being” surveys ask individuals to rate their present happiness, life-satisfaction, affective state, etc. A massive literature now engages in such surveys or correlates survey responses with individual attributes. And, increasingly, scholars argue for the policy relevance of happiness data: in particular, as a basis for calculating aggregates such as “gross national happiness,” or for calculating monetary equivalents for non-market goods based (...)
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  2. Consequentialism and the Autonomy of the Deontic.David Alm - 2008 - Utilitas 20 (2):199-216.
    I distinguish between two forms of consequentialism: reductionist and anti-reductionist. Reductionist consequentialism holds that the deontic properties of rightness and wrongness are identical with the axiological properties of optimality and suboptimality, respectively. Anti-reductionist consequentialism denies this identification, hence accepting what I call the autonomy of the deontic. In this article I ignore reductionist consequentialism. Instead I argue that anti-reductionist consequentialism is deeply problematic or even incoherent. Simply put, the main point is that the criterion of rightness of any ethical theory (...)
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  3. Ii. The One Good.John Anderson - 1945 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 23 (1-3):85 – 89.
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  4. Merit Pay, Utilitarianism, and Desert.Linda F. Annis - 1986 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 3 (1):33-41.
  5. For Our Own Good.David Archard - 1994 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 72 (3):283 – 293.
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  6. The Supererogatory and How Not To Accommodate It: A Reply to Dorsey.Alfred Archer - 2016 - Utilitas 28 (2):179-188.
    It is plausible to think that there exist acts of supererogation. It also seems plausible that there is a close connection between what we are morally required to do and what it would be morally good to do. Despite being independently plausible these two claims are hard to reconcile. My aim in this article will be to respond to a recent solution to this puzzle proposed by Dale Dorsey. Dorsey's solution to this problem is to posit a new account of (...)
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  7. The Good and the Right.M. C. D' Arcy - 1932 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 32:171.
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  8. Perfectionism and Politics.Richard J. Arneson - 2000 - Ethics 111 (1):37-63.
    Philosophers perennially debate the nature of the good for humans. Is it subjective or objective? That is to say, do the things that are intrinsically good for an agent, good for their own sakes and apart from further consequences, acquire this status only in virtue of how she happens to regard them? Or are there things that are good in themselves for an individual independently of her desires and attitudes toward them? The issue sounds recondite, but has been thought to (...)
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  9. What's Good on TV.Arp Robert - 2011 - Wiley.
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  10. Feldman's Desert-Adjusted Utilitarianism and Population Ethics.Gustaf Arrhenius - 2003 - Utilitas 15 (2):225.
    Fred Feldman has proposed a desert-adjusted version of utilitarianism,, as a plausible population axiology. Among other things, he claims that justicism avoids Derek Parfit's. This paper explains the theory and tries to straighten out some of its ambiguities. Moreover, it is shown that it is not clear whether justicism avoids the repugnant conclusion and that it is has other counter-intuitive implications. It is concluded that justicism is not convincing as a population axiology.
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  11. Toward the Good.Robert Audi - 2009 - In Harvey Siegel (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Education. Oxford University Press. pp. 333.
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  12. The Good in the Right.Robert Audi - 2007 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (1):250-261.
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  13. One Good.Claudia Baracchi - 2004 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 25 (2):19-49.
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  14. On God, the Good, and the Right.Michael Beaty - 1989 - Southwest Philosophy Review 5 (2):25-35.
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  15. Right Against Good.George Beiswanger - 1949 - Ethics 60 (2):112-119.
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  16. The Doctrine of Sufficiency: A Defence.Yitzhak Benbaji - 2005 - Utilitas 17 (3):310-332.
    This article proposes an analysis of the doctrine of sufficiency. According to my reading, the doctrine's basic positive claim is ‘prioritarian’: benefiting x is of special moral importance where (and only where) x is badly off. Its negative claim is anti-egalitarian: most comparative facts expressed by statements of the type ‘x is worse off than y’ have no moral significance at all. This contradicts the ‘classical’ priority view according to which, although equality per se does not matter, whenever x is (...)
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  17. The Rejection of Epistemic Consequentialism.Selim Berker - 2013 - Philosophical Issues 23 (1):363-387.
    A quasi-sequel to "Epistemic Teleology and the Separateness of Propositions." Covers some of the same ground, but also extends the basic argument in an important way.
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  18. Review of Gary E. Varner, Personhood, Ethics, and Animal Cognition: Situating Animals in Hare's Two-Level Utilitarianism. [REVIEW]Brian Berkey - 2012 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
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  19. Empirical and Armchair Ethics.Greg Bognar - 2012 - Utilitas 24 (04):467-482.
    In a recent paper, Michael Otsuka and Alex Voorhoeve present a novel argument against prioritarianism. The argument takes its starting point from empirical surveys on people's preferences in health care resource allocation problems. In this article, I first question whether the empirical findings support their argument, and then I make some general points about the use of ‘empirical ethics’ in ethical theory.
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  20. Theories of the Good.E. J. Bond - 1992 - In Lawrence C. Becker & Charlotte B. Becker (eds.), The Encyclopedia of Ethics. Garland Publishing.
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  21. Astronomical Waste: The Opportunity Cost of Delayed Technological Development.Nick Bostrom - 2009 - Utilitas 15 (3):308.
    With very advanced technology, a very large population of people living happy lives could be sustained in the accessible region of the universe. For every year that development of such technologies and colonization of the universe is delayed, there is therefore an opportunity cost: a potential good, lives worth living, is not being realized. Given some plausible assumptions, this cost is extremely large. However, the lesson for utilitarians is not that we ought to maximize the pace of technological development, but (...)
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  22. Without Good Reason.Michael Bradie - 2004 - International Studies in Philosophy 36 (4):131-132.
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  23. The Epistemic and Informational Requirements of Utilitarianism.Hugh Breakey - 2009 - Utilitas 21 (1):72-99.
    A recurring objection confronting utilitarianism is that its dictates require information that lies beyond the bounds of human epistemic wherewithal. Utilitarians require reliable knowledge of the social consequences of various policies, and of people’s preferences and utilities. Agreeing partway with the sceptics, I concur that the general rules-of-thumb offered by social science do not provide sufficient justification for the utilitarian legislator to rationally recommend a particular political regime, such as liberalism. Actual data about human preference-structures and utilities is required to (...)
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  24. Consequentialism and the Wrong Kind of Reasons: A Reply to Lang.John Brunero - 2010 - Utilitas 22 (3):351-359.
    In his article , Gerald Lang formulates the buck-passing account of value so as to resolve the Wrong Kind of Reason Problem. I argue against his formulation of buck-passing. Specifically, I argue that his formulation of buck-passing is not compatible with consequentialism (whether direct or indirect), and so it should be rejected.
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  25. Clues for Consequentialists.Joanna M. Burch-Brown - 2014 - Utilitas 26 (1):105-119.
    In an influential paper, James Lenman argues that consequentialism can provide no basis for ethical guidance, because we are irredeemably ignorant of most of the consequences of our actions. If our ignorance of distant consequences is great, he says, we can have little reason to recommend one action over another on consequentialist grounds. In this article, I show that for reasons to do with statistical theory, the cluelessness objection is too pessimistic. We have good reason to believe that certain patterns (...)
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  26. Martin Peterson, The Dimensions of Consequentialism: Ethics, Equality and Risk , Pp. Vii + 217. [REVIEW]Joanna M. Burch-Brown - 2014 - Utilitas 26 (2):223-226.
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  27. The Right and the Good.Burgh W. G. De - 1939 - Mind 48 (192):491 - 497.
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  28. Deep Down: Consequentialist Assumptions Underlying Policy Differences.Zeljka Buturovic - 2012 - Critical Review 24 (2):269-289.
    A conditional survey establishes a preliminary case for believing that policy differences are to some extent driven by fundamental beliefs about empirical aspects of society and economics. The survey shows willingness in about a third of all respondents to shift their expressed policy preferences when asked a hypothetical question positing negative consequences of their initial preferences. This suggests that assumptions about the consequences of public policies may play as important a role in policy preferences, or a more important role, than (...)
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  29. Normative Supervenience and Consequentialism.Krister Bykvist - 2003 - Utilitas 15 (1):27.
    Act-consequentialism is usually taken to be the view that we ought to perform the act that will have the best consequences. But this definition ignores the possibility of various non-maximizing forms of act-consequentialism, e.g. satisficing theories that tell us to perform the act whose consequences will be good enough. What seems crucial to act-consequentialism is not that we ought to maximize value but that the normative status of alternative actions depends solely on the values of their outcomes. The purpose of (...)
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  30. Might Anything Be Plain Good?Thomas Byrne - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (12):3335-3346.
    G.E. Moore said that rightness was obviously a matter of maximising plain goodness. Peter Geach and Judith Thomson disagree. They have both argued that ‘good’ is not a predicative adjective, but only ever an attributive adjective: just like ‘big.’ And just as there is no such thing as plain bigness but only ever big for or as a so-and-so, there is also no such thing as plain goodness. They conclude that Moore’s goodness is thus a nonsense. However attention has been (...)
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  31. Consequentialist Friendship and Quasi-Instrumental Goods.Michael Byron - 2002 - Utilitas 14 (2):249.
    Recent literature defends consequentialism against the charge that consequentialists cannot be friends. This paper argues in rebuttal that consequentialists value friends for the wrong reasons. Even if they are motivated by love and affection, consequentialists must act as if they valued their friends as merely instrumental goods, a mode of valuing I call. I conclude by suggesting the root cause of the problem of intrinsic value for consequentialism.
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  32. The Good Man and the Good.Mary Whiton Calkins - 1919 - Philosophical Review 28 (3):319-322.
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  33. Good, Better, or Best?Arthur L. Caplan - 2010 - In Julian Savulescu & Nick Bostrom (eds.), Human Enhancement. Oxford University Press.
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  34. Good, Better or Best.Arthur L. Caplan - 2009 - In Julian Savulescu & Nick Bostrom (eds.), Human Enhancement. Oxford University Press. pp. 199--209.
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  35. The “Good War”.Allan Carlson - 2008 - The Chesterton Review 34 (1/2):147-161.
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  36. Consequentialism, Distribution and Desert.Erik Carlson - 1997 - Utilitas 9 (3):307.
    This paper criticizes the consequentialist theory recently put forward by Fred Feldman. I argue that this theory violates two crucial requirements. Another theory, proposed by Peter Vallentyne, is similarly flawed. Feldman's basic ideas could, however, be developed into a more plausible theory. I suggest one possible way of doing this.
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  37. Utilitarianism and Moral Valuation of Lying.Miguel Catalán-González - 2004 - Philosophical Inquiry 26 (3):33-39.
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  38. The Limits of Kindness. By Caspar Hare. [REVIEW]Richard Yetter Chappell - 2014 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 201403.
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  39. Consequentialism and Abortion.Tim Chappell - 1992 - Philosophy Now 4:17-18.
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  40. Being Good.Timothy Chappell - 2002 - International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (2):262-265.
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  41. Aesop's Fox: Consequentialist Virtue Meets Egocentric Bias.Dale L. Clark - 2009 - Philosophical Psychology 22 (6):727 – 737.
    In her book Uneasy Virtue, Julia Driver presents an account of motive or trait utilitarianism, one that has been taken as “the most detailed and thoroughly defended recent formulation” of consequential virtue ethics. On Driver's account character traits are morally virtuous if and only if they generally lead to good consequences for society. Various commentators have taken Driver to task over this account of virtue, which she terms “pure evaluational externalism.” They object that, on Driver's account of virtue, it could (...)
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  42. Readjusting Utility for Justice.Dennis R. Cooley - 2000 - Journal of Philosophical Research 25:363-380.
    Despite the best efforts of utilitarians, justice remains a serious problem for consequentialism. Many counterexamples have been described which show that an agent may be obligated to do a gross injustice, according to hedonic utilitarianism, just because it maximizes utility. Fred Feldman attempts to avoid this result by adjusting utility for justice.In this paper, I examine Feldman’s axiology and his normative theory of world utilitarianism, and show that, ultimately, he is not successful in his endeavor. Though Feldman’s theories may not (...)
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  43. Well-Being and Morality: Essays in Honour of James Griffin.G. Cullity - 2002 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 80 (4):538-540.
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  44. Intuitions and the Demands of Consequentialism.Garrett Cullity, Brad Hooker & Tim Mulgan - 2011 - Utilitas 23 (1).
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  45. Art What is It Good For?Dolan Cummings & Institute of Ideas - 2002
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  46. Good for Us.Trevor Curnow - 2004 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 24 (1):69-70.
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  47. The Good and the Right.M. C. D'Arcy - 1931 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 32:171 - 206.
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  48. Are There Organic Unities?Jonathan Dancy - unknown
    Argues against G. E. Moore’s conception of organic unities, attempting to replace it with a conception more amenable to particularism. Considers the possibility of a form of default value acceptable to particularism. Ends by contrasting the views expressed here with those of Kagan.
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  49. Mill's Puzzling Footnote.Jonathan Dancy - 2000 - Utilitas 12 (2):219.
    This paper discusses various possible interpretations of a complex footnote in Mill's Utilitarianism.
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  50. Wiggins and Ross.Jonathan Dancy - 1998 - Utilitas 10 (3):281-285.
    Ross's attempt to undermine the consequentialist understanding of the relation between duties and outcomes might give him greater defence against the danger that outcome-related duties will come to constitute a norm, to the disadvantage of all others.
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