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  1. Veganism, (Almost) Harm-Free Animal Flesh, and Nonmaleficence: Navigating Dietary Ethics in an Unjust World.C. E. Abbate - 2019 - In Bob Fischer (ed.), Routledge Handbook of Animal Ethics.
    This is a chapter written for an audience that is not intimately familiar with the philosophy of animal consumption. It provides an overview of the harms that animals, the environment, and humans endure as a result of industrial animal agriculture, and it concludes with a defense of ostroveganism and a tentative defense of cultured meat.
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  2. Don’T Demean “Invasives”: Conservation and Wrongful Species Discrimination.C. E. Abbate & Bob Fischer - 2019 - Animals 871 (9).
    It is common for conservationists to refer to non-native species that have undesirable impacts on humans as “invasive”. We argue that the classification of any species as “invasive” constitutes wrongful discrimination. Moreover, we argue that its being wrong to categorize a species as invasive is perfectly compatible with it being morally permissible to kill animals—assuming that conservationists “kill equally”. It simply is not compatible with the double standard that conservationists tend to employ in their decisions about who lives and who (...)
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  3. Situating Environmental Philosophy in Canada.C. Tyler DesRoches, Frank Jankunis & Byron Williston - 2019 - In C. Tyler DesRoches, Frank Jankunis & Byron Williston (eds.), Canadian Environmental Philosophy. Montreal & Kingston:
    The volume includes topics from political philosophy and normative ethics on the one hand to philosophy of science and the philosophical underpinnings of water management policy on the other. It contains reflections on ecological nationalism, the legacy of Grey Owl, the meaning of ‘outside’ to Canadians, the paradigm shift from mechanism to ecology in our understanding of nature, the meaning of the concept of the Anthropocene, the importance of humans self-identifying as ‘earthlings’, the challenges of biodiversity protection and the status (...)
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  4. Analysis of the “European Charter on General Principles for Protection of the Environment and Sustainable Development” The Council of Europe Document CO-DBP 2.Maria A. Martin, Pablo Martínez de Anguita & Miguel Acosta - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (5):1037-1050.
    For almost 50 years, the Council of Europe through a series of documents has been helping to build up a set of rules, principles, and strategies related to culture, environment, ethics, and sustainable development. At the moment, one of the most important aims of the Council of Europe’s agenda deals with the elaboration of the General Principles for the Protection of the Environment and Sustainable Development, as raised in document CO-DBP (2003)2 related to the environmental subject. The intention of the (...)
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  5. Gratitude to Nature.Tony Manela - 2018 - Environmental Values 27 (6):623-644.
    In this article, I consider the claim that we ought to be grateful to nature and argue that this claim is unjustified. I proceed by arguing against the two most plausible lines of reasoning for the claim that we ought to be grateful to nature: 1) that nature is a fitting or appropriate object of our gratitude, and 2) that we ought to be grateful to nature insofar as gratitude to nature enhances, preserves or indicates in us the virtue of (...)
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  6. Environmental Ethics and Linkola’s Ecofascism: An Ethics Beyond Humanism.Evangelos D. Protopapadakis - 2014 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 9 (4):586-601.
    Ecofascism as a tradition in Environmental Ethics seems to burgeoning with potential. The roots of Ecofascism can be traced back to the German Romantic School, to the Wagnerian narration of the Nibelungen saga, to the works of Fichte and Herder and, finally, to the so-called völkisch movement. Those who take pride in describing themselves as ecofascists grosso modo tend to prioritize the moral value of the ecosphere, while, at the same time, they almost entirely devalue species and individuals. Additionally, these (...)
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  7. Religion and Ecological Justice in Africa: Engaging ‘Value for Community’ as Praxis for Ecological and Socio-Economic Justice.Obaji M. Agbiji - 2015 - Hts Theological Studies 71 (2):01-10.
    This article embarked on a critical evaluation of religious leadership and ecological consciousness in Africa, using the case of the Nigerian Christian religious community. The article argued that the concept of ecological justice lacks strong theological conceptualisation in the Nigerian ecclesiastical community. Therefore, Ime Okopido’s argument in favour of stewardship for the involvement of religious leadership in the pursuit of ecological and socioeconomic justice served as the starting point for this engagement. However, such engagement of the religious leadership and of (...)
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  8. Practical Ecology and Foundations for Environmentals Ethics.Kristin Shrader-Frechette - 1995 - Journal of Philosophy 92 (12):621.
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  9. Managing Impressions in the Face of Rising Stakeholder Pressures: Examining Oil Companies’ Shifting Stances in the Climate Change Debate.Mignon D. Van Halderen, Mamta Bhatt, Guido A. J. M. Berens, Tom J. Brown & Cees B. M. Van Riel - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (3):567-582.
    In this paper, we examine how organizations’ impression management evolves in response to rising stakeholder pressures regarding organizations’ corporate responsibility initiatives. We conducted a comparative case study analysis over a period of 13 years for two organizations—Exxon and BP—that took extreme initial stances on climate change. We found that as stakeholder pressures rose, their IM tactics unfolded in four phases: advocating the initial stance, sensegiving to clarify the initial stance, image repairing, and adjusting the stance. Taken together, our analysis of (...)
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  10. Book Review: Capitalism and Climate Change: Theoretical Discussion, Historical Development and Policy responsesKochMax, Capitalism and Climate Change: Theoretical Discussion, Historical Development and Policy Responses. [REVIEW]Andrew Gilbert - 2014 - Thesis Eleven 120 (1):124-127.
  11. The Extinction and De-Extinction of Species.Helena Siipi & Leonard Finkelman - 2017 - Philosophy and Technology 30 (4):427-441.
    In this paper, we discuss the following four alternative ways of understanding the outcomes of resurrection biology. Implications of each of the ways are discussed with respect to concepts of species and extinction. Replication: animals created by resurrection biology do not belong to the original species but are copies of it. The view is compatible with finality of extinction as well as with certain biological and ecological species concepts. Re-creation: animals created are members of the original species but, despite their (...)
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  12. De-Extinction as Artificial Species Selection.Derek Turner - 2017 - Philosophy and Technology 30 (4):395-411.
    This paper offers a paleobiological perspective on the debate concerning the possible use of biotechnology to bring back extinct species. One lesson from paleobiology is that extinction selectivity matters in addition to extinction rates and extinction magnitude. Combining some of Darwin’s insights about artificial selection with the theory of species selection that paleobiologists developed in the 1970s and 1980s provides a useful context for thinking about de-extinction. Using recent work on the prioritization of candidate species for de-extinction as a test (...)
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  13. Answering to Future People: Responsibility for Climate Change in a Breaking World.Tim Mulgan - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (2).
    Our everyday notions of responsibility are often driven by our need to justify ourselves to specific others – especially those we harm, wrong, or otherwise affect. One challenge for contemporary ethics is to extend this interpersonal urgency to our relations with those future people who are harmed or affected by our actions. In this article, I explore our responsibility for climate change by imagining a possible ‘broken future’, damaged by the carbon emissions of previous generations, and then asking what its (...)
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  14. Soil Depth and Soil Production.Allen G. Hunt - 2016 - Complexity 21 (6):42-49.
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  15. Essay Review: No Longer a Stranger? A Decade in the History of Ecology: Modeling Nature: Episodes in the History of Population Ecology, the Background of Ecology: Concept and Theory, Saving the Prairies: The Life Cycle of the Founding School of American Plant Ecology 1895–1955, Nature's Economy: A History of Ecological Ideas, Nature's Economy: The Roots of Ecology. [REVIEW]Malcolm Nicolson - 1988 - History of Science 26 (2):183-200.
  16. Essay Review: No Longer a Stranger? A Decade in the History of Ecology: Modeling Nature: Episodes in the History of Population Ecology, the Background of Ecology: Concept and Theory, Saving the Prairies: The Life Cycle of the Founding School of American Plant Ecology 1895–1955, Nature's Economy: A History of Ecological Ideas, Nature's Economy: The Roots of Ecology. [REVIEW]Malcolm Nicolson - 1988 - History of Science 26 (2):183-200.
  17. Mother Nature Kicks Back: Review of Sean B. Carroll’s 2016 The Serengeti Rules. [REVIEW]Lachlan Douglas Walmsley - 2017 - Biology and Philosophy 32 (1):133-146.
    Sean B. Carroll’s new book, The Serengeti Rules: The Quest to Discover How Life Works and Why it Matters, is a well-written mix of history of science and philosophy of biology. In his book, Carroll articulates a set of ecological generalisations, the Serengeti Rules, which are supposed to make salient the structures in ecosystems that ensure the persistence of those ecosystems. In this essay review, I evaluate Carroll’s use of the controversial concept of regulation and his thesis that ecosystems have (...)
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  18. Thinking About Nature: An Investigation of Nature, Value and Ecology.Andrew Brennan - 1988
    Ecology – unlike astronomy, physics, or chemistry – is a science with an associated political and ethical movement: the Green Movement. As a result, the ecological position is often accompanied by appeals to holism, and by a mystical quasi-religious conception of the ecosystem. In this title, first published in 1988, Andrew Brennan argues that we can reduce much of the mysticism surrounding ecological discussions by placing them within a larger context, and illustrating that our individual interests are bound with larger, (...)
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  19. La dissolution et la conservation de la foi.Dugas Dugas - 1899 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 47:528-532.
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  20. Review: Price, Principle, and the Environment, Mark Sagoff. Cambridge University Press, 2004, X + 284 Pp. [REVIEW]Pat Devine - 2006 - Economics and Philosophy 22 (2):281-287.
  21. Competition as a Dominant Concept in Ecology: On the Unity of Science and Ideology.Julio Muñoz Rubio - 2003 - Ludus Vitalis 11 (19):3-24.
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  22. Defusing the Population Bomb in the 1950s: Foam Tablets in India.Ilana Löwy - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 43 (3):583-593.
    After the World War II era, Western experts explained that the progress of medicine, which had led to a decrease in mortality in developing countries was not accompanied by a parallel decrease in birth rates . This conjunction, they warned, would lead inexorably to population explosion and its terrifying consequences: famines, riots, political instability, expansion of Communism, wars. A heterogenous coalition of demographers, public health experts and politicians was urgently looking for an effective means to curb population growth. In the (...)
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  23. Suppressing Liberty, Censoring Information, Wasting Resources, and Calling It Good for the Environment: J. R. Clark and Dwight R. Lee. [REVIEW]J. R. Clark - 2009 - Social Philosophy and Policy 26 (2):272-295.
    This paper considers prevailing environmental policy in the United States with the emphasis on liberty, markets, utilizing information, entrepreneurial discovery, and the economic analysis of political decisions. The general discussion is illustrated by the concern over global warming and policies for addressing this concern. The political incentives to confront environmental problems directly with mandates, restrictions, and subsidies ignore the power of liberty and market incentives to solve problems by fostering an impressive network of information transfer, increasing innovation, and expanding prosperity. (...)
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  24. Environmental Risks, Social Asymmetry, and Late Modernity: Toward a Political Ecology.Margarita Alario - 1993 - Social Theory and Practice 19 (3):275-288.
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  25. Time-Plans of the Organisms: Jakob von Uexkull’s Explorations Into the Temporal Constitution of Living Beings.Riin Magnus - 2011 - Sign Systems Studies 39 (2/4):37-56.
    The term “time-plan” is introduced in the article to sum up the diversity of temporal processes described by Jakob von Uexküll in the frameworkof the general Planmässigkeit of nature. Although Uexküll hardly had any connections with his contemporary philosophies of time, the theme of the subjectivetimes and timing of the organisms forms an essential part of his umwelt theory. As an alternative to the dominance of evolutionary time in biological discussions, Uexküll took perceptual and developmental times of organisms as his (...)
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  26. Self-Validating Reduction: Toward a Theory of Environmental Devaluation.Anthony Weston - 1996 - Environmental Ethics 18 (2):115-132.
    Disvaluing nature—a cognitive act—usually leads quickly to devaluing it too: to real-world exploitation and destruction. Worse, in fact, nature in its devalued state can then be held up as an excuse and justification for the initial disvaluation. In this way, dismissal and destruction perpetuate themselves. I call this process “self-validating reduction.” It is crucial to recognize the cycle of self-validating reduction, both in general and specifically as it applies to nature, if we are to have any chance of reversing it.
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  27. Environmental Thought in Argentina: A Panoramic View.Daniel Eduardo Gutiérrez - 2012 - Environmental Ethics 34 (4):399-410.
    Unlike Columbian environmental philosophy, which achieves a certain degree of unity because of the influence of the writings of Augusto Angel-Maya, Argentinean environmental philosophy is more diverse and represents a panorama of views and approaches. Nevertheless, although they could not be said to be environmental philosophy as such, the writings of Rodolfo Kusch could make a significant contribution to environmental thought strongly anchored in the peculiarities of our culture. Alicia Irene Bugallo has worked on themes of ecophilosophy, and has introduced (...)
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  28. The Landscape Approach: Designing New Reserves for Protection of Biological and Cultural Diversity in Latin America.Sergio Guevara & Javier Laborde - 2008 - Environmental Ethics 30 (3):251-262.
    One of the greatest challenges for Latin America and the Caribbean, the most biologically and culturally diverse region in the world, is to halt the loss of species caused by habitat destruction and land degradation. Up to now, setting aside protected natural areas is con­sidered the most effective alternative to conserve biodiversity. Protected areas, however, are under increasing assault by agricultural, silvicultural, and industrial development that surround and isolate them, reducing their habitat quality at the landscape scale. Among the different (...)
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  29. Nature, Natives, Nativism, and Management: Worldviews Underlying Controversies in Invasion Biology.Daniel Simberloff - 2012 - Environmental Ethics 34 (1):5-25.
    Non-native species are implicated in many ecological and economic problems, and the field of invasion biology has burgeoned in response to this fact. However, classification, terminology, and management of non-native species generate controversies and even calls for abolition of the field. The fact that the basis for disputes is differing worldviews rather than simply interpretation of biological observations suggests that resolving arguments about non-native species will be difficult, independently of questions about the operational tractability of proposed courses of action.
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  30. Superando la Dicotomía Entre Conocimiento Local y Global: Diversas Perspectivas sobre la Naturaleza en la Reserva de Biosfera Cabo de Hornos.Uta Berghöfer, Ricardo Rozzi & Kurt Jax - 2008 - Environmental Ethics 30 (Supplement):57-79.
    Un estudio de caso de investigación socio-ecológica realizado en Puerto Williams, Cabo de Hornos, revela que las personas pertenecientes a diferentes grupos socioculturales poseen una diversidad de perspectivas y relaciones con la naturaleza. Por ejemplo, los miembros de la Comunidad Indígena Yagán y los antiguos residentes, expresaron un fuerte sentimiento de pertenencia y hogar. Sin embargo, las personas identificadas con el uso de los recursos no tuvo respuestas positivas respecto al sentimiento de hogar. Entre los entrevistados, el concepto de un (...)
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  31. The Self-Poetizing Earth: Heidegger, Santiago Theory, and Gaia Theory.Henry Dicks - 2011 - Environmental Philosophy 8 (1):41-61.
    Although Heidegger thinks cybernetics is the “supreme danger,” he also thinks that it harbours within itself poiēsis, the “saving power.” This article providesa justification of this position through an analysis of its relation to Humberto Maturana and Francisco Varela’s Santiago theory of cognition and James Lovelock and Lynn Margulis’ Gaia theory. More specifically, it argues that Maturana and Varela’s criticism of cybernetics and their concomitant theory of “autopoiesis” constitutes the philosophical disclosure of “Being itself,” and that the extension of Santiago (...)
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  32. Staying True to Trees: A Specific Look at Anthropocentrism and Non-Anthropocentrism.Christian Diehm - 2008 - Environmental Philosophy 5 (2):3-16.
    This essay examines how becoming familiar with trees in their specificity might impact how we position ourselves in the ongoing debate among environmental philosophers regarding anthropocentric and non-anthropocentric approaches to environmental ethics. It begins with an analysis of what the process of learning to identify trees entails, and a discussion of how this often involves the development of non-instrumentalist evaluative attitudes towards them, an axiological orientation at odds with the instrumental reductivism characteristic of anthropocentric views. It is then argued that (...)
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  33. The Enemy of Nature: The End of Capitalism or the End of the World? [REVIEW]Keith Peterson - 2008 - Environmental Philosophy 5 (2):174-176.
  34. Going Back to Nature When Nature’s All But Gone.Stephanie Mills - 2008 - Environmental Philosophy 5 (1):1-8.
    Stephanie Mills presented the following as the keynote address at the 2007 Annual Meeting of the International Association for Environmental Philosophy in Chicago. Mills addresses the readers of this journal in her role as a bioregional author and social critic. Adopting a narrative style rather than the typical format of the “philosophical essay,” she raises questions that are always and still at the core of our philosophical dialogue: What is nature? How do we humans perceive our relationship with nature? And (...)
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  35. Forest and Philosophy: Toward an Aesthetics of Wood.Galen A. Johnson - 2007 - Environmental Philosophy 4 (1/2):59-75.
    This paper initiates a phenomenological study of the aesthetics of forest and wood in three main phases. First, we consider the modalities of wood’s sensuousness and argue against the formalist tradition that restricts aesthetic appreciation to visual forms. Second, we examine the structural, eidetic features of hand-made wooden objects in the “second life” of trees. Third, we engage in reflections on the communities gathered by the first and second lives of trees. These themes outline an aesthetics of the beautiful, the (...)
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  36. Ecologizing Sartre’s Ontology: Nature, Science, and Dialectics.Matthew C. Ally - 2012 - Environmental Philosophy 9 (2):95-121.
    I argue that Sartre’s philosophy can be both broadened in its aspirations and deepened in its implications through dialogue with the life sciences. Section 1 introduces the philosophical terrain. Section 2 explores Sartre’s evolving understanding of nature and human relations with nature. Section 3 explores Sartre’s perspectives on scientific inquiry, natural history, and dialectical reason. Section 4 outlines recent developments in the life sciences that bear directly on Sartre’s quiet curiosity about a naturalistic dialectics. Section 5 suggests how these developments (...)
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  37. The Virtue of Temporal Discernment: Rethinking the Extent and Coherence of the Good in a Time of Mass Species Extinction.James Hatley - 2012 - Environmental Philosophy 9 (1):1-21.
    How might human beings be called to exercise virtue, which is to say, modes of acknowledgement, humility, and discernment, in regard to the impending extinction of the human species? It is argued that the inevitable extinction of the human species be affirmed as a good, in spite of how daunting and uncanny this act might be. This affirmation is called for as humans struggle to find an ethical response appropriate to their creaturely existence, as well as to their devastating complicity (...)
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  38. Conservation Refugees: The Hundred-Year Conflict Between Global Conservation and Native Peoples. [REVIEW]Loren Cannon - 2012 - Environmental Philosophy 9 (1):141-144.
  39. Pining for the Present: Ecological Remembrance and Healing in the Armidale State Forest.Katherine Wright - 2012 - Environmental Philosophy 9 (1):109-126.
    The Armidale State Forest is a pine plantation at the edge of the Armidale city in New South Wales, Australia. In 2000 and 2007 large parts of the forest were destroyed in clear-felling operations. This sparked community outrage which led to the formation of advocacy groups who have begun to restore the forest despite its controversial position as a “conifer invader” in Eucalypt country. In this paper I focus on the way personal memories are embodied in the pine forms to (...)
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  40. Dōgen and the Unknown Knowns: The Practice of the Wild After the End of Nature.Jason M. Wirth - 2013 - Environmental Philosophy 10 (1):39-61.
    Thinkers like Slavoj Žižek and Tim Morton have heralded the end of our ideological constructions of nature, warning that popular “ecology” or the “natural” is just the latest opiate of the masses. Attempting to think what I call Nature after Nature, I turn to the Kamakura period Zen master Dōgen Eihei to explore the possibilities of thinking Nature in its non-ideological self-presentation or what Dōgen called “mountains and rivers.” I bring Dōgen into dialogue with his great champion, the American poet (...)
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  41. From Terra Nullius to Terra Communis: Reconsidering Wild Land in an Era of Conservation and Indigenous Rights.Yogi Hale Hendlin - 2014 - Environmental Philosophy 11 (2):141-174.
    This article argues that understanding “wild” land as terra nullius emerged during historical colonialism, entered international law, and became entrenched in national constitutions and cultural mores around the world. This has perpetuated an unsustainable and unjust human relationship to land no longer tenable in the post-Lockean era of land scarcity and ecological degradation. Environmental conservation, by valuing wild lands, challenges the terra nullius assumption of the vulnerability of unused lands to encroachment, while indigenous groups reasserting their rights to communal territories (...)
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  42. Heidegger and the Art of Technology: A Response to Eric Katz.Brendan Mahoney - 2014 - Environmental Philosophy 11 (2):279-306.
    This article critiques Eric Katz’s claim that technology and artifacts are intrinsically anthropocentric, and thus essentially aimed at controlling and dominating nature. Drawing on Martin Heidegger’s philosophy of technology, I argue Katz’s position is founded on a narrow ‘means-end’ concept of technology. Building on Heidegger’s work, I propose rethinking technology through the broader ancient Greek concept of techne. I then claim the concept of techne enables us to develop an understanding of technology that is not intrinsically anthropocentric and dominating. Finally, (...)
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  43. Galapagos and Cape Horn: Ecotourism or Greenwashing in Two Emblematic Latin American Archipelagoes?Ricardo Rozzi, Francisca Massardo, Felipe Cruz, Christophe Grenier, Andrea Muñoz & Eduard Mueller - 2010 - Environmental Philosophy 7 (2):1-32.
    True ecotourism requires us to regain an understanding of the inextricable links between the habitats of a region, including its inhabitants, and their habits. With this systemic approach that integrates economic, ecological, and ethical dimensions, we define ecotourism as “an invitation to a journey to appreciate and share the ‘homes’ of diverse human and non-human inhabitants, their singular habits and habitats.” Today, mass nature tourism often denies theselinks and is generating biocultural homogenization, socio-ecological degradation, and marked distributive injustices in iconic (...)
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  44. Domesticating Nature?: Surveillance and Conservation of Migratory Shorebirds in the “Atlantic Flyway”.Kristoffer Whitney - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 45 (1):78-87.
    Using a recent environmental controversy on the U.S. east coast over the conservation of red knots as a lens, I present a history of North American efforts to understand and conserve migratory shorebirds. Focusing on a few signal pieces of American legislation and their associated bureaucracies, I show the ways in which migratory wildlife have been thoroughly enrolled in efforts to quantify and protect their populations. Interactions between wildlife biologists and endangered species have been described by some scholars as “domestication”—a (...)
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  45. Business, Ethics, and the Environment: Imagining a Sustainable Future. [REVIEW]Raymond Benton - 2008 - Business Ethics Quarterly 18 (4):567-581.
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  46. Fresh Water and Catholic Social Teaching: A Vital Nexus.Christiana Z. Peppard - 2012 - Journal of Catholic Social Thought 9 (2):325-351.
  47. Scientific Heritage: Reflections on its Nature and New Approaches to Preservation, Study and Access.Marta C. Lourenço & Lydia Wilson - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (4):744-753.
    Scientific heritage can be found in every teaching and research institution, large or small, from universities to museums, from hospitals to secondary schools, from scientific societies to research laboratories. It is generally dispersed and vulnerable. Typically, these institutions lack the awareness, internal procedures, policies, or qualified staff to provide for its selection, preservation, and accessibility. Moreover, legislation that protects cultural heritage does not generally apply to the heritage of science. In this paper we analyse the main problems that make scientific (...)
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  48. Field Environmental Philosophy: Regaining an Understanding of the Inextricable Links Between the Regional Habitats, the Inhabitants and Their Habits.Ricardo Rozzi - 2010 - Dialogue and Universalism 20 (11-12):85-109.
    During our current free market era, a prevailing utilitarian ethics centered on monetary cost benefit analyses continues overriding incessantly a plethora of diverse forms of ecological knowledge and ethics present in the communities of South America, and other regions of the world. For the first time in human history, more than 50% of the world’s population lives in cities, and speaks only one of eleven dominant languages, loosing contact with the vast biodiversity and the 7,000 languages that are still spoken (...)
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  49. The Joyful Wisdom of Ecology on Perspectival and Relational Contact with Nature and Animality.Ralph Acampora - 2003 - New Nietzsche Studies 5 (3/4/1/2):22-34.
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  50. Minding Nature: The Philosophers of Ecology. [REVIEW]Thomas Heyd - 1999 - Dialogue 38 (1):168-170.
    This book does not propose to discuss a Spinozist conception of nature, as we might have hoped, given its title. The book is not about the philosophy of the science of ecology, either, as its subtitle would suggest, but rather about our approaches to the natural environment insofar as it is involved by human activity.
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