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  1. Why a uniform carbon tax is unjust, no matter how the revenue is used, and should be accompanied by a limitarian carbon tax.Fausto Corvino - forthcoming - Journal of Global Ethics.
    A uniform carbon tax with equal per capita dividends is usually advocated as a cost-effective way of reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without increasing, and in many cases even reducing, economic inequality, in particular because of the positive balance between the carbon taxes paid by the worse off and the carbon dividends they receive back. In this article, I argue that a uniform carbon tax reform is unjust regardless of how the revenue is used, because it does not discourage the (...)
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  2. Gardens of Refuge, Innocence, and Toil.Ian James Kidd - manuscript
    A rhetoric of refuge and escape is a consistent feature of the world’s great garden traditions. The connections between a desire for escape, need for refuge and disquieting sense that life is no longer what it ought to be gestures to a complex conception of garden appreciation. I explore these connections using Christian, Islamic, and Chinese garden traditions. In them one finds a conception of certain gardens as places of moral refuge from the corruption and failings of the mainstream world.
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  3. Winds of change: An engaged ethics approach to energy justice.Brandstedt Eric, Busch Henner, Lycke Ellen & Ramasar Vasna - 2024 - Energy Research and Social Science 110 (April 2024):103427.
    Theories of energy justice are standardly used to evaluate decision-making and policy-design related to energy infrastructure. All too rarely attention is paid to the need for a method of justifying principles of justice as well as justice-based judgments that are appealed to in this context. This article responds to this need by offering an engaged ethics approach to normative justification useful for energy justice theory. More specifically, it presents a method of public reflective equilibrium and shows its potential as systematic (...)
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  4. Touching the Earth: Buddhist (and Kierkegaardian) Reflections on and of the ‘Negative’ Emotions.Rupert Read - 2023 - Religions 14 (12):1451.
    This article develops the philosophical work of Joanna Macy. It argues that ecological grief is a fitting response to our ecological predicament and that much of the ‘mental ill health’ that we are now seeing is, in fact, a perfectly sane response to our ecological reality. This paper claims that all ecological emotions are grounded in love/compassion. Acceptance of these emotions reveals that everything is fine in the world as it is, providing that we accept our ecological emotions as part (...)
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  5. Wicked Problems: A Discussion Note.Gustaf Arrhenius & Joe Roussos - 2021 - Institute for Futures Studies Working Papers.
    This note critiques the concept of “wicked problems” and its usefulness in crises such as Covid-19. There are two problems with the concept as defined by Rittel, Webber, and those who draw from them, which undermine its value in the analysis of social policy. First, their characterisation of wicked problems is founded on a crude and false picture of science (cf. Turnbull and Hoppe 2019). Second, it is so vague that on an expansive reading all social problems are wicked problems (...)
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  6. Widely Agreeable Moral Principles Support Efforts to Reduce Wild Animal Suffering.Tristan Katz - forthcoming - Journal of Applied Animal Ethics Research.
    Every day, wild animals suffer and die from myriad natural causes. For those committed to non-speciesism, what wild animal suffering entails for us morally is a question of the utmost importance, and yet there remains significant disagreement at the level of normative theory. In this paper I argue that in situations of moral urgency environmental managers and policy makers should refer to widely-agreeable moral principles for guidance. I claim that the principles of beneficence, non-maleficence, autonomy and justice do well to (...)
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  7. That Seed Sets Time Ablaze.John Charles Ryan - 2017 - Environmental Philosophy 14 (2):163-189.
    The time of vegetal life itself—denoted as plant-time in this article, following the work of Michael Marder—is essential to human-plant relations. Conceptualized as a multi-dimensional plexity, vegetal temporality embodies the endemic land-based seasons, rhythms, cycles, and timescales of flora in conjunction with human patterns. The contemporary poet Judith Wright invoked a time-space continuum throughout her writing as a means to convey the primordial character of Australian plants while resisting the imposition of a colonialist schema of time. Wright’s bold textualization of (...)
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  8. The Six Extinctions.Joseph Masco - 2017 - Environmental Philosophy 14 (1):11-40.
    This article examines the visualization strategies informing public understandings of planetary scale ecological crisis. Working with scientific visualizations as well as the Suicide Narcissus art exhibition, it interrogates the inherent problems in conveying extinction as a process and future potential. This essay ultimately considers the psychosocial tensions inherent in contemplating collective death.
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  9. Endling, the Power of the Last in an Extinction-Prone World.Dolly Jørgensen - 2017 - Environmental Philosophy 14 (1):119-138.
    In April 1996, two men working at a convalescent center wrote a letter to the journal Nature proposing that a new word be adopted to designate a person who is the last in the lineage: endling. This had come up because of patients who were dying and thought of themselves as the last of their family line. The word was not picked up in medical circles. But, in 2001, when the National Museum of Australia (NMA) opened its doors, it featured (...)
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  10. Bioethics and the Challenge of the Ecological Individual.Jonathan Beever & Nicolae Morar - 2016 - Environmental Philosophy 13 (2):215-238.
    Questions of individuality are traditionally predicated upon recognizing discrete entities whose behavior can be measured and whose value and agency can be meaningfully ascribed. We consider a series of challenges to the metaphysical concept of individuality as the ground of the self. We argue that an ecological conception of individuality renders ascriptions of autonomy to selves highly improbable. We find conceptual resources in the work of environmental philosopher Arne Naess, whose distinction between shallow and deep responses helps us rethink the (...)
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  11. Biomimicry and the Materiality of Ecological Technology and Innovation.Vincent Blok - 2016 - Environmental Philosophy 13 (2):195-214.
    In this paper, we reflect on the concept of nature that is presupposed in biomimetic approaches to technology and innovation. Because current practices of biomimicry presuppose a technological model of nature, it is questionable whether its claim of being a more ecosystem friendly approach to technology and innovation is justified. In order to maintain the potentiality of biomimicry as ecological innovation, we explore an alternative to this technological model of nature. To this end, we reflect on the materiality of natural (...)
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  12. The Sublime Anthropocene.Byron Williston - 2016 - Environmental Philosophy 13 (2):155-174.
    In the Anthropocene, humanity has been forced to a self-critical reflection on its place in the natural order. A neglected tool for understanding this is the sublime. Sublime experience opens us up to encounters with ‘formless’ nature at the same time as we recognize the inevitability of imprinting our purposes on nature. In other words, it is constituted by just the sort of self-critical stance towards our place in nature that I identify as the hallmark of the Anthropocene ‘collision’ between (...)
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  13. The Reversibilty of Landscapes.Kenneth Liberman - 2016 - Environmental Philosophy 13 (1):35-56.
    Environmental philosophy has been burdened with perspectives that have failed to afford access to the actual experience of living in a landscape, and dualist and nondualist inquiries alike are plagued by anthropocentrisms that seem impossible to escape. This contribution explores how we can investigate the relation of humans and landscapes in ways that preserve what occurs there, and begin to open such experience to rigorous scrutiny. To this end, resources are drawn and synthesized from the thinking of Merleau-Ponty, Derrida, Georg (...)
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  14. Taking Nature Seriously in the Anthropocene.Donald S. Maier - 2016 - Environmental Philosophy 13 (1):1-33.
    Nature conservation in the Anthropocene predominantly supposes that human-caused changes have worsened nature’s condition, which warrants undertaking conservation projects that actively manage or manipulate nature to improve it in quality or quantity. This essay surveys, by category, reasons and arguments for pursuing these projects. It finds key reasons to be normatively unimportant and key arguments incomplete or invalid. Conservation on this basis does not take nature seriously because it acts “for no good reason.” Finally, by attending to underlying sources of (...)
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  15. Healing the wounds of marine mammals by protecting their habitat.Giuseppe Notarbartolo di Sciara & Erich Hoyt - 2020 - Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 20:15-23.
    Important marine mammal areas (IMMAs)—‘discrete habitat areas, important for one or more marine mammal species, that have the potential to be delineated and managed for conservation’ (IUCN Marine Mammal Protected Areas Task Force 2018, p. 3)—were introduced in 2014 by the IUCN Marine Mammal Protected Areas Task Force to support marine mammal and wider ocean conservation. IMMAs provide decision-makers with a user-friendly, actionable tool to inform them of the whereabouts of habitat important for marine mammal survival. However, in view of (...)
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  16. Limited Aggregation for Resolving Human-Wildlife Conflicts.Matthias Eggel & Angela K. Martin - 2022 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 1.
    Human-wildlife interactions frequently lead to conflicts – about the fair use of natural resources, for example. Various principled accounts have been proposed to resolve such interspecies conflicts. However, the existing frameworks are often inadequate to the complexities of real-life scenarios. In particular, they frequently fail because they do not adequately take account of the qualitative importance of individual interests, their relative importance, and the number of individuals affected. This article presents a limited aggregation account designed to overcome these shortcomings and (...)
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  17. The Biomimicry Revolution: Learning from Nature how to Inhabit the Earth.Henry Dicks - 2023 - New York: Columbia University Press.
    Modernity is founded on the belief that the world we build is a human invention, not a part of nature. The ecological consequences of this idea have been catastrophic. We have laid waste to natural ecosystems, replacing them with fundamentally unsustainable human designs. With time running out to address the environmental crises we have caused, our best path forward is to turn to nature for guidance. In this book, Henry Dicks explores the philosophical significance of a revolutionary approach to sustainable (...)
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  18. Why I Should Still Offset Rather Than Do More Good.Kritika Maheshwari - 2022 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 25 (3):249-252.
    ABSTRACT Stefansson (forthcoming) argues that by emitting and offsetting, we fail to fulfil our justice-based duty to avoid harm owed to specific individuals. In this paper, I explore a case where offsetting fails to prevent some but not all risks of harms that our emissions impose on them. By drawing on a distinction between general and specific duties not to (risk) harm, I argue that if by emitting and offsetting, we satisfy some (if not all) of our specific duties we (...)
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  19. Pragmatic Environmentalism: Towards a Rhetoric of Eco-Justice.Shane Ralston - 2011 - Leicester: Troubador.
    Although this book is about the newly emerging academic field of environmental communication, it is also about voice and practical activism. I contend that a deeply pragmatic form of environmental communication has the potential to transform the way environmental activists speak about their methods and goals – moving them toward a rhetoric of eco-justice. Sometimes looking forward requires stepping back – in this case back to two progressive era thinkers who revolutionised our outlook on social and environmental justice: John Dewey (...)
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  20. The effect of the environment on the physical appearance and mood of humans from the perspective of philosophers.Abduljaleel Kadhim Alwali - 2022 - International Journal of Sustainable Society 14 (No.1):pp.77 - 92.
    This paper seeks to examine the thought of philosophers about the influence of the environment on humans' physical, mental and moral habits, as well as how these philosophers used this influence to categorise individuals according to their habitat. As such this research begins with Herodotus and Hippocrates, and briefly discusses Plato, Aristotle, and seven medieval philosophers belonging to Jewish, Christian, and Islamic religions (Al-Kindi, Eriugena, Al-Farabi, Ibn Sina, Ibn Tufail, Averroes, and Moses Maimonides). Also, this study investigates Montesquieu from the (...)
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  21. Gardens and the Good Life in Confucianism and Daoism.Ian James Kidd - 2022 - In Laura D’Olimpio, Panos Paris & Aidan Thompson (eds.), Educating Character Through the Arts. London: Routledge. pp. 125-139.
    Creating and caring for a garden is a long-term project whose success requires commitment and devotion and love and proper performance of a range of activities that involve virtues and sensibilities like attentiveness, carefulness, humility, imaginativeness, and sensitivity to the natures and needs of plants and animals. In this chapter, I elaborate this conception of gardens and explore its relationship to artistic activities, like composing poetry or performing music. My focus are Confucianism and Daosim and their accounts of the relationships (...)
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  22. Technology, capitalism, and christianity: Are they really the three horsemen of the eco-collapse?Lawrence J. Axelrod & Peter Suedfeld - 1995 - Journal of Environmental Psychology 15 (3):183-195.
    This paper examines the evidence concerning the frequent accusation that technology, capitalism, and Christianity—three bases of modern Western society—are root causes of environmental degradation. A critical assessment indicates that, although these aspects of the present-day world are associated with failures to protect the environment, labeling them as causal factors contradicts known facts. A major theme of the paper is the combined application of scientific and folk wisdom in addressing environmental issues. An attempt is made to synthesize different positions, and the (...)
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  23. The New Biology: Discovering the Wisdom in Nature.George Stanciu - 1989 - Environmental Ethics.
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  24. Review of The Experience of Landscape. [REVIEW]John Stuart-Murray - 1998 - Environmental Values 7 (3):359-360.
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  25. Review of The Ethics of Creativity: Beauty, Morality and Nature in a Processive Cosmos. [REVIEW]Brian Henning - 2007 - Environmental Ethics.
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  26. Review of Reinhabiting Reality: Towards a Recovery of Culture. [REVIEW]Freya Mathews - 2006 - Environmental Ethics.
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  27. Review of For Love of Matter: A Contemporary Panpsychism. [REVIEW]Freya Mathews - 2006 - Environmental Ethics.
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  28. Is Nature Purposeful.Robert Augros - 1996 - Perspectives on Science and Christian Faith 4.
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  29. Environmental Ethics: Divergence and Convergence, Reviewed by David Rothenberg.David Rothenberg - 1994 - Environmental Ethics.
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  30. Review of: Alison Stone, Petrified Intelligence: Nature in Hegel's Philosophy. [REVIEW]Paul Ashton - 2006 - Environmental Values.
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  31. Justifying Sustainability.Geir B. Asheim, Wolfgang Buchholz & Bertil Tungodden - 2001 - Journal of Environmental Economics and Management 41 (3):252-268.
    In the framework of ethical social choice theory, sustainability is justified by efficiency and equity as ethical axioms. These axioms correspond to the Suppes–Sen grading principle. In technologies that are productive in a certain sense, the set of Suppes–Sen maximal utility paths is shown to equal the set of non-decreasing and efficient paths. Since any such path is sustainable, efficiency and equity can thus be used to deem any unsustainable path as ethically unacceptable. This finding is contrasted with results that (...)
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  32. On the Defence of the Human Individual and Non-Human Nature.Edgar Arredondo - 1995 - Department of Philosophy, Lancaster University.
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  33. Black Environmentalism in the Local Community Context.Wiwam Arp & Christopher Kenny - 1996 - Environment and Behavior 28 (3):267-282.
    In this article it is argued that existing studies of Black environmentalism do not appropriately measure the environmental concerns and activities most relevant to Blacks and hence do not accurately reflect the extent to which African Americans are responsive on environmental issues. Using data that measure Black environmental concern and activity in communities threatened by hazardous industries to various degrees, the authors evaluate 2 competing sets of expectations regarding the manner in which these concerns and activities are affected by differential (...)
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  34. Dead Coyote Walking.Pat Arnow - forthcoming - Philosophy and Geography.
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  35. The structure of the land use regulatory system in the united states.Craig Anthony Arnold - 2007 - Journal of Land Use and Environmental Law 22 (2):441-523.
    Land use regulation is one of the most poorly understood areas of law and public policy in the United States. At the same time, the land use regulatory system is expected to solve complex issues. The structure of the land use regulatory system can tell us quite a bit about the role that land use regulation, especially local land use regulation, can play in addressing specific public policy problems. This article illuminates common misunderstandings associated with the land use regulatory system, (...)
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  36. Working Out an Environmental Ethic: Anniversary Lessons from Mono Lake.Craig Anthony Arnold - 2007 - Wyoming Law Review 4 (1).
    Can environmental law actually achieve environmental conservation or implement an environmental ethic in practice? The environmental movement has been captured by a legal centralist perspective, which asserts that legal institutions and processes are integral to achieving environmental conservation and environmentally ethical behavior.
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  37. Fair and Healthy Land Use.Craig Anthony Arnold - forthcoming - American Planning Association.
    Learn to incorporate the principles of environmental justice into your planning processes. This PAS Report outlines the law and regulatory tools.
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  38. The Reconstitution of Property: Property as a Web of Interests.Craig Anthony Arnold - 2007 - Harvard Environmental Law Review 26 (2).
    The metaphor of property as a "bundle of sticks: or "bundle of rights" leads to the "disintegration of property": a concept of property that is too incoherent, ill-defined, and malleable to be meaningful. This article identifies several theoretical problems with the bundle of rights metaphor, and proposes a new metaphor of property as a web of interests.
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  39. What Process Philosophy Can Contribute to the Land Ethic and Deep Ecology. Armstrong-Buck - 1991 - Trumpeter.
  40. Justice in the Air. Energy Policy, Greenhouse-effect and the Question of Global Justice.Finn Arler - 1995 - Human Ecology Review 2:40-61.
  41. Aspects of landscape or nature quality.Finn Arler - 2000 - Landscape Ecology 15:291-302.
    Landscape or nature quality has become a key concept in relation to nature policy and landscape planning. In the first part of the article it is argued, that these qualities should not be conceived as mere expressions of private or subjective preferences. Even though there may not be any `objective' or `scientific' method dealing with them, they are still values which can be shared, reflected on, and discussed in a reasonable way. The connoisseurs are introduced as experienced persons, who are (...)
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  42. Sustainability, Morality and Future Generations.Per Ariansen - 1999 - In . Palgrave Macmillan Uk. pp. 84-96.
    Environmental philosophy has brought two topics to the forefront of philosophical discussion. One is the anthropocentrism/non-anthropocentrism debate in ethics, and the other is the question of obligations towards future generations. The deeper motives for focusing on these issues are, of course, intimately tied to the fact that the present generation may well be on its way to introducing practically irreversible and catastrophic damage to the global ecosystem. For the first time, one has to acknowledge that the global system does not (...)
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  43. The non-utility value of nature - a contribution to understanding the value of biological diversity.Per Ariansen - 1997 - Research Gate 19:3-45.
    Concepts of Value in the natural environment are examined and the concept of constitutive value is introduced and discussed.
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  44. Anthropocentrism with a human face.Per Ariansen - 1998 - Ecological Economics 24:153-162.
    There is a widely held belief that there are moral limits to what we can do to non-human living beings. This has inspired various varieties of non-anthropocentric ethics. Whether rights- or welfare-oriented, the focus has been on the organisms’ interests. The ability of these theories to explain the moral significance of interests and, more generally, to identify the source of obligation in ethics, is questioned. The metaphor of a game is provided, with the rules of a game, as a model (...)
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  45. Science and Culture in the Environmental State: The Case of Reactor Layups at Ontario Hydro.Bruce Arai - 2001 - Organization and Environment - Organ Environ 14:409-424.
    The widespread concern about the declining state of our physical environment is often accompanied by frustration about what to do to prevent or even reverse such deterioration. In the past, policy makers, legislators, and the general public have usually turned to scientists and scientific knowledge for answers. But recently, theorists and others have reemphasized the importance of culture in understanding the environment. In this article, this culturalist critique of scientific knowledge is discussed and is then related to the decision by (...)
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  46. Biosafety, Ethics, and Regulation of Transgenic Animals.Raymond Anthony & Paul B. Thompson - 2004 - In . Humana Press. pp. 183-206.
    Transgenic animals—animals with genes added to their deoxyribonucleic acid —will no longer be limited by the gene pool of their parents. Such animals are slated to be created expressly to provide vital and novel benefits for human beings. These animals can have desirable characteristics or traits from virtually any gene pool and may also possess properties not present in nature or available through conventional breeding. They will be created for the production of new medical and pharmaceutical products and to enhance (...)
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  47. The Natural Imperative for Biological Conservation.Paul L. Angermeier - 2000 - Conservation Biology 14 (2):373-381.
    To contribute significantly to environmental policy of the next century, conservationists will need to reach a consensus on their fundamental values and goals and to persuade society to adopt them. Resolution of the debate over the continued role of naturalness as a guiding concept has important implications for how conservation is practiced and the future of the discipline. I examine five aspects of naturalness in the context of biological conservation: its utility, its assessment, its relation to values and ethics, alternative (...)
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  48. Does Biodiversity Include Artificial Diversity?Paul L. Angermeier - 1994 - Conservation Biology 8 (2):600-602.
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  49. Biological Integrity Versus Biological Diversity as Policy Directives: Protecting Biotic Resources.Paul L. Angermeier & James R. Karr - 1996 - In Paul L. Angermeier & James R. Karr (eds.), Ecosystem Management. Springer. pp. 264-275.
    Two phrases — biological integrity and biological diversity—have joined the lexicon of biologists and natural resource managers during the past two decades. The importance of these phrases is demonstrated by their influence on environmental research, regulatory, and policy agendas. The concepts behind the phrases are central to strategies being developed to sustain global resources. Unfortunately, the phrases are widely used by the media, citizens, policy makers, and some biologists without adequate attention to the concepts they embody. Precise use of the (...)
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  50. Stewardship, Concept Of.Peter Alpert - unknown - In . pp. 481-494.
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