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  1. Hacking Into Hacking: Gender and the Hacker Phenomenon.A. E. Adam - 2003 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 33 (4):3.
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  2. Sister Species: Women, Animals and Social Justice.Carol J. Adams - 2011 - University of Illinois Press.
  3. Western Ethnocentrism and Perceptions of the Harem.Leila Ahmed - 1982 - Feminist Studies 8 (3):521.
  4. Feminist Futures.Sara Ahmed - 2003 - In Mary Eagleton (ed.), A Concise Companion to Feminist Theory. Blackwell.
  5. Surfing the Third Wave: A Dialogue Between Two Third Wave Feminists.Rita Alfonso & Jo Trigilio - 1997 - Hypatia 12 (3):7-16.
    As third wave feminist philosophers attending graduate schools in different parts of the country, we decided to use our e-mail discussion as the format for presenting our thinking on the subject of third wave feminism. Our dialogue takes us through the subjects of postmodernism, the relationship between theory and practice, the generation gap, and the power relations associated with feminist philosophy as an established part of the academy.
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  6. Women and Food.Jeffner Allen - 1984 - Journal of Social Philosophy 15 (2):34-41.
  7. Hegel Knits.Jami L. Anderson - 2008 - APA Newsletter of Feminism and Philosophy.
    Although typical arguments for knitting are that it is useful, therapeutic or the latest trend, I argue that knitting can play a life-changing part in the creation of a person’s self. Knitting can be a genuinely powerful activity, one worthy of respect and admiration.
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  8. Different Voices or Perfect Storm: Why Are There So Few Women in Philosophy?Louise Antony - 2012 - Journal of Social Philosophy 43 (3):227-255.
  9. Gendered Slurs.Lauren Ashwell - 2016 - Social Theory and Practice 42 (2):228-239.
    Slurring language has had a lot of recent interest, but the focus has been almost exclusively on racial slurs. Gendered pejoratives, on the other hand—terms like “slut,” “bitch,” or “sissy”—do not fit into existing accounts of slurring terms, as these accounts require the existence of neutral correlates, which, I argue, these gendered pejoratives lack. Rather than showing that these terms are not slurs, I argue that this challenges the assumption that slurs must have neutral correlates, and so that a new (...)
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  10. Book Review: Martine Watson Brown Ley and Allison B. Kimmich. Women and Autobiography. Wilmington, Delaware: Scholarly Resources, 2000. [REVIEW]Susan Babbitt - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (3):215-218.
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  11. The Feminist Philosophy Reader.Alison Bailey & Chris Cuomo - 2008 - McGraw Hill.
    The most comprehensive anthology of feminist philosophy available, this first edition reader brings together over 55 of the most influential and time-tested works to have been published in the field of feminist philosophy. Featuring perspectives from across the philosophical spectrum, and from an array of different cultural vantage points, it displays the incredible range, diversity, and depth of feminist writing on fundamental issues, from the early second wave to the present.
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  12. The Reproduction of Whiteness: Race and the Regulation of the Gendered Body.Alison Bailey & Jacquelyn N. Zita - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (2):vii-xv.
    Historically critical reflection on whiteness in the United States has been a long-standing practice in slave folklore and in Mexican resistance to colonialism, Asian American struggles against exploitation and containment, and Native American stories of contact with European colonizers. Drawing from this legacy and from the disturbing silence on "whiteness" in postsecondary institutions, critical whiteness scholarship has emerged in the past two decades in U.S. academies in a variety of disciplines. A small number of philosophers, critical race theorists, postcolonial theorists, (...)
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  13. Representative Women: Slavery, Citizenship, and Feminist Theory in Du Bois's “Damnation of Women”.Lawrie Balfour - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (3):127-148.
    In this essay, I contend that feminist theories of citizenship in the U.S. context must go beyond simply acknowledging the importance of race and grapple explicitly with the legacies of slavery. To sketch this case, I draw upon W.E.B. Du Bois's "The Damnation of Women," which explores the significance for all Americans of African American women's sexual, economic, and political lives under slavery and in its aftermath.
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  14. Definition and the Question of “Woman”.Victoria Barker - 1997 - Hypatia 12 (2):185-215.
    Within recent feminist philosophy, controversy has developed over the desirability, and indeed, the possibility of defining the central terms of its analysis-"woman," "femininity," etc. The controversy results largely from the undertheorization of the notion of definition; feminists have uncritically adopted an Aristotelian treatment of definition as entailing metaphysical, rather than merely linguistic, commitments. A "discursive" approach to definition, by contrast, allows us to define our terms, while avoiding the dangers of essentialism and universalism.
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  15. Reply to Commentators on Femininity and Domination.Sandra Bartky - 1993 - Hypatia 8 (1):192-196.
  16. Sarah Grimké: Letters on the Equality of the Sexes and Other Essays.Elizabeth Ann Bartlett - 1989 - Hypatia 4 (1):175-180.
  17. 'Misery Loves Company': Sexual Trauma, Psychoanalysis and the Market for Misery. [REVIEW]Victoria Bates - 2012 - Journal of Medical Humanities 33 (2):61-81.
    This article examines sexual ‘misery memoirs’, focusing on author/reader and genre/market relationships in the context of models of trauma and child sexual abuse. It shows that the success of sexual ‘misery memoirs’ is inextricably bound up with the popular dissemination of a feminist-psychoanalytic model of traumatic memory that has taken place since the 1970s. It also argues that, as the ‘truth’ of recovered and traumatic memories has been fundamental to its success, anxieties about false memory and hoax ‘misery memoirs’ have (...)
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  18. What is a Stereotype? What is Stereotyping?Erin Beeghly - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (4):675-691.
    If someone says, “Asians are good at math” or “women are empathetic,” I might interject, “you're stereotyping” in order to convey my disapproval of their utterance. But why is stereotyping wrong? Before we can answer this question, we must better understand what stereotypes are and what stereotyping is. In this essay, I develop what I call the descriptive view of stereotypes and stereotyping. This view is assumed in much of the psychological and philosophical literature on implicit bias and stereotyping, yet (...)
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  19. Women's Ways of Knowing: The Development of Self, Voice, and Mind.Mary Field Belenky, Blythe Mcvicker Clinchy, Nancy Rule Goldberger & Jill Mattuck Tarule - 1988 - Hypatia 3 (2):177-179.
  20. A Woman's Scorn: Toward a Feminist Defense of Contempt as a Moral Emotion.Macalester Bell - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (4):80-93.
    In an effort to reclaim women's moral psychology, feminist philosophers have reevaluated several seemingly negative emotions such as anger, resentment, and bitterness. However, one negative emotion has yet to receive adequate attention from feminist philosophers: contempt. I argue that feminists should reconsider what role feelings of contempt for male oppressors and male-dominated institutions and practices should play in our lives. I begin by surveying four feminist defenses of the negative emotions. I then offer a brief sketch of the nature and (...)
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  21. A Woman's Scorn: Toward a Feminist Defense of Contempt as a Moral Emotion.Macalester Bell - 2000 - Hypatia 20 (4):80-93.
  22. Women and AIDS: Too Little, Too Late?Nora Kizer Bell - 1989 - Hypatia 4 (3):3 - 22.
    Many authors examine the governmental, the scientific, and the sexual politics of AIDS. Many of these same authors tell the AIDS story within the context of decrying homophobia. The implications of that story, however, have a troubling significance for women. This essay proposes to move the discussion of the sexual politics of AIDS beyond the confines of homophobia and to highlight issues not widely discussed outside of AIDS activist circles-issues which are having, and will continue to have, profound effects on (...)
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  23. Feminism and the A-Word: Power and Community in the University.Paul Benson - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (4):223-229.
  24. A Republican Housewife: Marie‐Jeanne Phlipon Roland on Women's Political Role.Sandrine Bergès - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (1):107-122.
    In this paper I look at the philosophical struggles of one eighteenth-century woman writer to reconcile a desire and obvious capacity to participate in the creation of republican ideals and their applications on the one hand, and on the other a deeply held belief that women's role in a republic is confined to the domestic realm. I argue that Marie-Jeanne Phlipon Roland's philosophical writings—three unpublished essays, published and unpublished letters, as well as parts of her memoirs—suggest that even though she (...)
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  25. How Many Feminists Does It Take To Make A Joke? Sexist Humor and What's Wrong With It.Memo Bergmann - 1986 - Hypatia 1 (1):63-82.
    In this paper I am concerned with two questions: What is sexist humor? and what is wrong with it? To answer the first question, I briefly develop a theory of humor and then characterize sexist humor as humor in which sexist beliefs are presupposed and are necessary to the fun. Concerning the second question, I criticize a common sort of argument that is supposed to explain why sexist humor is offensive: although the argument explains why sexist humor feels offensive, it (...)
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  26. February 22, 2001: Toward a Politics of the Vulnerable Body.Debra Bergoffen - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (1):116-134.
    On February 22, 2001, three Bosnian Serb soldiers were found guilty of crimes against humanity. Their offense? Rape. This is the first time that rape has been prosecuted and condemned as a crime against humanity. Appealing to Jacques Derrida's democracy of the perhaps and Judith Butler's politics of performative contradiction, I see this judgment inaugurating a politics of the vulnerable body which challenges current understandings of evil, war crimes, and crimes against humanity.
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  27. The Just War Tradition: Translating the Ethics of Human Dignity Into Political Practices.Debra B. Bergoffen - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (2):72-94.
  28. Marriage, Autonomy, and the Feminine Protest.Debra B. Bergoffen - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (4):18-35.
    This paper may be read as a reclamation project. It argues, with Simone de Beauvoir, that patriarchal marriage is both a perversion of the meaning of the couple and an institution in transition. Parting from those who have given up on marriage, I identify marriage as existing at the intersection of the ethical and the political and argue that whether or not one chooses marriage, feminists ought not abandon marriage as an institution.
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  29. The Logic of the Development of Feminism; or, Is MacKinnon to Feminism as Parmenides Is to Greek Philosophy?Susan E. Bernick - 1992 - Hypatia 7 (1):1-15.
    Catharine MacKinnon's investigation of the role of sexuality in the subordination of women is a logical culmination of radical feminist thought. If this is correct, the position of her work relative to radical feminism is analogous to the place Parmenides's work occupied in ancient Greek philosophy. Critics of MacKinnon's work have missed their target completely and must engage her work in a different way if feminist theory is to progress past its current stalemated malaise.
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  30. Evil Deceivers and Make-Believers: On Transphobic Violence and the Politics of Illusion.Talia Mae Bettcher - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (3):43-65.
    This essay examines the stereotype that transgender people are "deceivers" and the stereotype's role in promoting and excusing transphobic violence. The stereotype derives from a contrast between gender presentation and sexed body. Because gender presentation represents genital status, Bettcher argues, people who "misalign" the two are viewed as deceivers. The author shows how this system of gender presentation as genital representation is part of larger sexist and racist systems of violence and oppression.
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  31. Promising Monsters: Pregnant Bodies, Artistic Subjectivity, and Maternal Imagination.Rosemary Betterton - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (1):80-100.
    This paper engages with theories of the monstrous maternal in feminist philosophy to explore how examples of visual art practice by Susan Hiller, Marc Quinn, Alison Lapper, Tracey Emin, and Cindy Sherman disrupt maternal ideals in visual culture through differently imagined body schema. By examining instances of the pregnant body represented in relation to maternal subjectivity, disability, abortion, and "prosthetic" pregnancy, it asks whether the "monstrous" can offer different kinds of figurations of the maternal that acknowledge the agency and potential (...)
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  32. Rethinking Ecofeminist Politics.Janet Biehl - 1992 - Hypatia 7 (3):216-220.
  33. Renaturalizing the Body.Carol Bigwood - 1991 - Hypatia 6 (3):54-73.
    Some poststructuralist feminist theorists hold that the body is merely the product of cultural determinants and that gender is a free-floating artifice. I discuss how this "denaturalization" of gender and the body entrenches us yet deeper in the nature/culture dichotomy. The body, I maintain, needs to be "renaturalized" so that its earthy significance is recognized. Through a feminist reappropriation of Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology of the body, I develop a noncausal linkage between gender and the body. I present the body as an (...)
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  34. Self‐Fulfilling Prophecies: The Influence of Gender Stereotypes on Functional Neuroimaging Research on Emotion.Robyn Bluhm - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (4):870-886.
    Feminist scholars have shown that research on sex/gender differences in the brain is often used to support gender stereotypes. Scientists use a variety of methodological and interpretive strategies to make their results consistent with these stereotypes. In this paper, I analyze functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) research that examines differences between women and men in brain activity associated with emotion and show that these researchers go to great lengths to make their results consistent with the view that women are more (...)
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  35. Feeling Power: Emotions and Education.Megan Boler - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (1):205-209.
  36. Feminist Interpretations of Descartes.Susan Bordo - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (2):190-194.
  37. “Maleness” Revisited.Susan Bordo - 1992 - Hypatia 7 (3):197-207.
  38. Contentious Freedom: Sex Work and Social Construction.Susan J. Brison - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (4):192-200.
    In this article, Brison extends the analysis of freedom developed in Nancy J Hirschmann's book, The Subject of Liberty: Toward a Feminist Theory of Freedom, to an area of controversy among feminist theorists: that of sex work, including prostitution and participation in the production of pornography. This topic raises some of the same issues concerning choice and consent as the three topics Hirschmann discusses in her book-domestic violence, the current welfare system in the United States, and Islamic veiling-but it also (...)
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  39. Contentious Freedom: Sex Work and Social Construction.Susan J. Brison - 2001 - Hypatia 21 (4):192-200.
  40. Feminist Perspectives on the Body.Barbara Brook, Gail Weiss, Honi Fern Haber, Jane Arthurs & Jean Grimshaw - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (2):160-169.
  41. Suzanne M. Zeedyk, and Fiona E. Raitt, The Implicit Relation of Psychology and Law: Women and Syndrome Evidence. [REVIEW]Belinda Brooks-Grodon - 2002 - Feminist Legal Studies 10 (2):195-197.
  42. Impressionism a Feminist Reading : The Gendering of Art, Science, and Nature in the Nineteenth Century.Norma Broude - 1997
  43. Possible and Questionable: Opening Nietzsche's Genealogy to Feminine Body.Kristen Brown - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (3):39-58.
    According to Kelly Oliver and Elizabeth Grosz, while Friedrich Nietzsche begins to open Western philosophy to the other, the body, he cuts off feminine body. Here I create a framework through which the possibility and questionability of a symbolically feminine body begins to emerge. I do this by using the metaphor of Indian curry. The metaphor works on two levels: 1) as a symbolically feminine body; 2) as Nietzsche's conception of subject-formation as a dynamic monism.
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  44. Sexuality and Feminism in Shelley.Nathaniel Brown - 1979
  45. Manhood and Politics.Wendy Brown - 1990 - Hypatia 5 (3):175-180.
  46. Emigration for Women.E. L. Browne - 1883
  47. Mary Astell: Defender of the “Disembodied Mind”.Cynthia B. Bryson - 1998 - Hypatia 13 (4):40-62.
    This paper demonstrates how Mary Astell's version of Cartesian dualism supports her disavowal of female subordination and traditional gender roles, her rejection of Locke's notion of "thinking matter" as a major premise for rejecting his political philosophy of "social contracts" between men and women, and, finally, her claim that there is no intrinsic difference between genders in terms of ratiocination, the primary assertion that grants her the title of the first female English feminist.
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  48. Feminine Stubble.Rachel Burgess - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (3):230-237.
  49. I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala.Elisabeth Burgos-Debray & Ann Wright - 1994 - Hypatia 9 (2):225-229.
  50. From Ethical Substance to Reflection: Hegel’s Antigone.Victoria I. Burke - 2008 - Mosaic: A Journal for the Interdisciplinary Study of Literature 41 (3).
    Hegel’s treatment of Sophocles’s Antigone exposes a tension in our own landscape between religious and civil autonomy. This tension reflects a deeper tension between unreflective, implicit norms and reflective, explicit norms that can be autonomously endorsed. The tension is, as Hegel recognizes, of particular importance to women. Hegel’s characterization of this tension in light of Antigone is, as H.S. Harris argues, both a more developed and a more fundamental moment in the Phenomenology of Spirit than the moment of Enlightenment autonomy (...)
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