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  1. Jl Abellan (1993). Reflections on the Spanish Understanding of the Word Race, in the Light of the 500th Anniversary of the Discovery of America. Filosoficky Casopis 41 (2):277-288.
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  2. Wayne Allen (1999). Eric Voegelin on the Genealogy of Race. International Philosophical Quarterly 39 (3):317-337.
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  3. Kal Alston (forthcoming). Race Consciousness and the Philosophy of Education. Philosophy of Education.
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  4. Luvell Anderson, Sally Haslanger & Rae Langton (2012). Language and Race. In Gillian Russell & Delia Graff Fara (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Language. Routledge.
  5. Barbara S. Andrew (2000). Beauvoir and The Second Sex: Feminism, Race, and the Origins of Existentialism (Review). Journal of Speculative Philosophy 14 (2):156-160.
  6. Meg Armstrong (1996). "The Effects of Blackness": Gender, Race, and the Sublime in Aesthetic Theories of Burke and Kant. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 54 (3):213-236.
  7. Alison Bailey (2005). Book Review: Naomi Zack.Women of Color and Philosophy. Malden, Mass.: Blackwell Publishers, 2000. [REVIEW] Hypatia 20 (1):220-225.
    Naomi Zack’s unique and important collection, Women of Color and Philosophy, brings together for the first time the voices of twelve philosophers who are women of color. She begins with the premise that the work of women of color who do philosophy in academe, but who do not write exclusively on issues of race, ethnicity, and gender, merits a collection of its own. It’s rare that women of color pursue philosophy in academic contexts; Zack counts at most thirty among the (...)
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  8. Katharine Lawrence Balfour (1996). The Evidence of Things Not Said: Race Consciousness and Political Theory. Dissertation, Princeton University
    Despite the abolition of racial slavery and legal segregation, James Baldwin believed that African Americans were not recognized as free and equal citizens and that they would not be until Americans of all races examined the racial assumptions undergirding American society. His essays, which were written between the 1940s and the 1980s, provide a valuable guide for political theorists interested in the possibilities of democracy in a society where white supremacy has been discredited and yet the distinction between "white" and (...)
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  9. George Bellis (2000). 3. The White Nun in Rattlebone. Logos 3 (2).
  10. Bettina Bergo (2013). A Story to Make You Sad: On Alexis Shotwell's Knowing Otherwise: Race, Gender, and Implicit Understanding. Phaenex 8 (1):233-239.
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  11. Robert Bernasconi (2011). Kant's Third Thoughts on Race. In Stuart Elden & Eduardo Mendieta (eds.), Reading Kant's Geography. State University of New York Press. pp. 291--318.
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  12. Walter Block (2011). Review of Easterly's The White Man's Burden. [REVIEW] Libertarian Papers 3.
    William Easterly has a reputation of being a free enterprise oriented economist. Were this not the case, his 2006 book The White Man’s Burden would not have been such a disappointment. In the event, this author misunderstands economic planning; buys into the fallacious notion of the poverty trap ; accepts a positive role for government in development, just as does Easterly’s target, Jeffrey Sachs; calls for state investment in early education; extols the virtues of democracy; attacks the idea of private (...)
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  13. O. K. Bouwsma (1939). On 'This is White'. Philosophical Review 48 (1):71-73.
  14. Philip Alexander Bruce (1914). Race Segregation in the United States. Hibbert Journal 13:867.
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  15. Karla C. Holloway (2006). Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Accidental Communities: Race, Emergency Medicine, and the Problem of PolyHeme”: The “R” Word: Bioethics and a (Dis)Regard of Race. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (3):W46-W48.
  16. Susan Campbell (1994). "Black Bolsheviks" and Recognition of African-America's Right to Self-Determination by the Communist Party USA. Science and Society 58 (4):440 - 470.
    The U.S. Communist Party's support for the notion of a "Black-Belt Nation" in the South has generally been seen as an aberration, attributable to the ultra-leftism of the Comintern's Third (or "class against class") Period. This interpretation underestimates the role of "Black Bolsheviks" — many of them of Caribbean origin — in the early history of the CPUSA, and fails to grasp the full significance of the campaigns waged by Communists and other anti-racists in the 1930s. Whether or not the (...)
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  17. J. Kameron Carter (2001). Race: A Theological Account. Dissertation, University of Virginia
    Can being, more specifically, black being, be thematized as visible from within the particularity of a given faith tradition, its practices and mode of being in the world? To narrow the question to one specific faith tradition, Christianity: Can blackness be visible within the visibility of the Christian factum---the incarnate God, Jesus of Nazareth? The first two chapters, drawing on the work of Albert J. Raboteau, Charles H. Long, and James H. Cone, show how African American religious scholarship, to varying (...)
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  18. Timothy Chambers (2009). Black Bodies, White Gazes: The Continuing Significance of Race. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 156.
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  19. Timothy Chambers (2009). George Yancy, Black Bodies, White Gazes: The Continuing Significance of Race. Radical Philosophy 156:56.
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  20. Nahum Dimitri Chandler (1997). The Problem of Purity: A Study in the Early Work of W. E. B. Du Bois. Dissertation, The University of Chicago
    This dissertation proposes a reconsideration of the some of work of W. E. B. Du Bois from the period 1897 to 1915. The study reconstructs Du Bois's understanding of the so-called Negro question and considers his challenges to existing interpretations of this social problem. Methodologically the study proceeds by way of a close examination of three principal early texts of Du Bois's, "The Conservation of Races," "Strivings of the Negro People," and "The Study of the Negro Problems," all written or (...)
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  21. Speaking Of Civilizations (2002). Race, Culture, Identity: Misunderstood Connections. In P. H. Coetzee & A. P. J. Roux (eds.), Philosophy From Africa: A Text with Readings. Oxford University Press.
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  22. Christine Clarke (2010). Fuelling the Machine: Slave Trade and the Industrial Revolution. Constellations 1 (2).
    Some have contested the Industrial Revolution’s status as a climactic event bringing social and political upheaval. However, the abolishment of slavery, the destruction of traditional ways of life, and the rise of class-consciousness confirm the climactic nature of this period. In analyzing the dramatic changes in the social organization of British society, this paper aims to reclaim the title of the Industrial Revolution as just that--revolutionary.
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  23. Bridget J. Crawford & Lolita Buckner Inniss, Multiple Anxieties: Breaching Race, Class and Gender Norms with Assisted Reproduction.
    Nadya Suleman and her octuplets are the vehicles through which Americans express their anxiety about race, class and gender. Expressions of concern for the health of children, the mother's well-being, the future of reproductive medicine or the financial drain on taxpayers barely conceal deep impulses towards racism, sexism and classism. This essay describes eight socio-legal anxieties that coalesce in response to Suleman's story: (1) race and racial hierarchies; (2) the contingency of white privilege; (3) the nature of white motherhood; (4) (...)
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  24. James T. Cushing (1993). Book Review:Too Hot to Handle: The Race for Cold Fusion Frank Close. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 60 (4):666-.
  25. Richard Delgado & Jean Stefancic (2001). Critical Race Theory an Introduction.
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  26. Alexis Dianda & Robin M. Muller (2014). Further Reading in Philosophy and Race. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 35 (1-2):429-441.
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  27. T. J. Donahue, Democracy, Race, and Authority; or, Rescuing Democratic Authority From Global Oppression.
  28. Kristie Dotson (2016). Word to the Wise: Notes on a Black Feminist Metaphilosophy of Race. Philosophy Compass 11 (2):69-74.
    It is not uncommon to ask a race and gender-based question of a philosopher of race, only to hear ‘I do race, not gender’. To the ears of many Black feminists, this sounds, to be frank, utterly foolish. Here, I identify three metaphilosophical assumptions, i.e. the disaggregation, fundamentality and transcendental assumptions, that aid in underwriting the ability to use the statement, ‘I do race, not gender’, as a means for avoiding gender-based questions in ‘race talks’. Then, I gesture to a (...)
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  29. Frank C. Dukepoo (1998). Commentary on “Scientific Limitations and Ethical Ramifications of a Non-Representative Human Genome Project: African American Responses” (F. Jackson). [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (2):171-180.
  30. Frantz Fanon, Ragnar Farr, Institute of Contemporary Arts & Institute of International Visual Arts (1995). Mirage Enigmas of Race, Difference, and Desire.
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  31. David Farber (2005). Thinking and Not Thinking About Race in the United States. Modern Intellectual History 2 (3):433-446.
  32. K. Feder Ellen (2007). Family Bonds: Genealogies of Race and Gender. Oup Usa.
    Ellen Feder's monograph is an attempt to think about the categories of race and gender together. She explains and then employs some critical tools derived from Foucault , in order to advance her main argument: that the institution of the family is the locus of the production of gender and race, and that gender is best understood as a function of a "disciplinary" power that operates within the family, while race is the function of a "regulatory" power acting upon the (...)
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  33. Ellen K. Feder (2007). The Dangerous Individual('s) Mother: Biopower, Family, and the Production of Race. Hypatia 22 (2):60-78.
    : Even as feminist analyses have contributed in important ways to discussions of how gender is raced and race is gendered, there has been little in the way of comparative analysis of the specific mechanisms that are at work in the production of each. Feder argues that in Michel Foucault's analytics of power we find tools to understand the reproduction of whiteness as a complex interaction of distinctive expressions of power associated with these categories of difference.
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  34. Ellen K. Feder (2007). The Dangerous Individual Mother: Biopower, Family, and the Production of Race. Hypatia 22 (2):60-78.
  35. W. J. Felix (1937). Interracial Justice. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 12 (3):510-511.
  36. R. Austin Freeman (1925). Racial Realities in Europe. The Eugenics Review 17 (1):42.
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  37. Katy Fulfer (2015). Commercial Contract Pregnancy in India, Judgment, and Resistance to Oppression. Hypatia 30 (4):846-861.
    Feminist scholars have done much to identify oppressive forces within transnational commercial contract pregnancy and its social context that may coerce women into becoming gestational laborers. Feminists have also been careful not to depict gestational laborers as merely passive victims of oppression, though there is disagreement about the degree to which contract pregnancy offers opportunities for agency. In this article I consider how women who sell gestational labor may be agents against their oppression. I make explicit connections between resistance and (...)
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  38. Stephen M. Gardiner (2009). Saved by Disaster? Abrupt Climate Change, Political Inertia, and the Possibility of an Intergenerational Arms Race. Journal of Social Philosophy 40 (2):140-162.
  39. Joseph C. Glose (1942). Scientific Aspects of the Race Problem. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 17 (1):183-184.
  40. Michele Goodwin (2008). Review of L. Prograis and E. Pellegrino, Eds., African American Bioethics: Culture, Race, and Identity. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 8 (11):52-54.
  41. Paul Gormley (2001). Trashing Whiteness: Pulp Fiction, Se7en, Strange Days, and Articulating Affect. Angelaki 6 (1):155 – 171.
  42. Justin Gosling (1977). Reply to White. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 7 (2):307 - 314.
  43. Ruth Groenhout (2010). The Difference Difference Makes : Public Health and the Complexities of Racial and Ethnic Differences. In Jackie Leach Scully, Laurel Baldwin-Ragaven & Petya Fitzpatrick (eds.), Feminist Bioethics: At the Center, on the Margins. Johns Hopkins University Press.
  44. Laurie Guy (2011). Shaping Godzone: Public Issues and Church Voices in New Zealand 1840-2000. Victoria University Press.
    Machine-generated contents note: Preface -- 1 - Introduction -- Section One: Race Relations and Racial (In)justice in Colonial New Zealand -- 2 - Missionary and Maori, 1840-1865 -- 3 - Voiceless at Parihaka, 1881 -- 4 - Anti-Asian Racism in 'White' New Zealand -- Section Two: Legislating for Godliness -- 5 - Keeping Quiet About the Sabbath, 1860-1930 -- 6 - Sunday or Fun-day, 1931-1990 -- 7 - The Battle of the Booze -- 8 - Uncorking the Bottle: The Alcohol (...)
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  45. Leonard Harris (2014). Philosophy of Philosophy: Race, Nation, and Religion. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 35 (1-2):369-380.
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  46. Leonard Harris (2000). :Blackness Visible: Essays on Philosophy and Race. Ethics 110 (2):432-434.
    Charles Mills makes visible in the world of mainstream philosophy some of the crucial issues of the black experience. Ralph Ellison's metaphor of black invisibility has special relevance to philosophy, whose demographic and conceptual "whiteness" has long been a source of wonder and complaint to racial minorities. Mills points out the absence of any philosophical narrative theorizing and detailing race's centrality to the recent history of the West, such as feminists have articulated for gender domination. European expansionism in its various (...)
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  47. Lisa Maree Heldke (2004). A Du Boisian Proposal for Persistently White Colleges. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 18 (3):224 - 238.
    What would it look like for a college, white in its history and predominantly white in its present reality, to create a program that responds to, and works in support of, the agenda Du Bois proposes for the “Negro university” of the 1930’s? How can a white college cease to be an obstacle to the liberation of African Americans? That is, how can a persistently white college become actively antiracist and pursue a goal of educating antiracist white students—students who could (...)
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  48. Janell Hobson (2003). The "Batty" Politic: Toward an Aesthetics of the Black Female Body. Hypatia 18 (4):87-105.
  49. Christopher Hom (2008). The Semantics of Racial Epithets. Journal of Philosophy 105 (8):416-440.
    Racial epithets are derogatory expressions, understood to convey contempt toward their targets. But what do they actually mean, if anything? While the prevailing view is that epithets are to be explained pragmatically, I argue that a careful consideration of the data strongly supports a particular semantic theory. I call this view Combinatorial Externalism. CE holds that epithets express complex properties that are determined by the discriminatory practices and stereotypes of their corresponding racist institutions. Depending on the character of the institution, (...)
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  50. Lloyd G. Humphreys (1976). Race and Sex Differences and Their Implications for Educational and Occupational Equality. Educational Theory 26 (2):135-146.
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