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  1. Extrinsic Value and the Separability of Reasons.Barry Maguire - 2016 - Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics 6.
    This paper presents a puzzle for Act Consequentialists who do not want to shoot Pelé. The puzzle arises from cases involving the promotion of virtue, and motivates a systematic restriction on the separability of reasons.
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  2. Techne in Aristotle's Ethics: Crafting the Moral Life.Tom Angier - 2010 - Continuum.
    'By identifying the extent to which Aristotle's thinking about ethics was shaped by notions drawn from the crafts Angier has thrown new light on a surprising number of topics and has deepened our understanding of tensions within Aristotle's thought. It is by now a rare achievement to have said something new, true and important about Aristotle.' -- Alasdair MacIntyre, Emeritus Professor of Philosophy, University of Notre Dame, USA.
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  3. Indications of Virtues in Conscientiousness and its Practice Through Continuous Improvement.José Hernández & Ricardo Mateo - 2012 - Business Ethics: A European Review 21 (2):140-153.
    There is convergence among researchers of the ‘Big Five’ personality traits taxonomy, that the dimension of conscientiousness best explains differences in work performance. This research is a literature review on the interrelationship between certain traits of the conscientiousness dimension and human virtues, or character traits. It also analyzes whether or not it is rational to argue that the continuous improvement culture enhances the exercise of these character traits. The personal effort to develop one's conscientiousness enriches one's character or way of (...)
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  4. Virtue Ethics.Stephen L. Darwall (ed.) - 2002 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    _ Virtue Ethics_ collects, for the first time, the main classical sources and the central contemporary expressions of virtue ethics approach to normative ethical theory. Edited and introduced by Stephen Darwall, these readings are essential for anyone interested in normative theory. Introduced by Stephen Darwall, this collection brings together classic and contemporary readings which define and advance the literature on virtue ethics. Includes six essays which respond to the classic sources. Includes a contemporary discussion on character and virtue by Gary (...)
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  5. A Third Method of Ethics?Roger Crisp - 2015 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 90 (2):257-273.
    In recent decades, the idea has become common that so-called virtue ethics constitutes a third option in ethics in addition to consequentialism and deontology. This paper argues that, if we understand ethical theories as accounts of right and wrong action, this is not so. Virtue ethics turns out to be a form of deontology . The paper then moves to consider the Aristotelian distinction between right or virtuous action on the one hand, and acting rightly or virtuously on the other. (...)
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  6. Universalism Versus Nihilism: In the Absence of a Universalist Narrative — Is a New Virtue Ethics Possible?Werner Krieglstein - 2009 - Dialogue and Universalism 19 (3-5):151-165.
    Both nihilism and universalism are historical products of Western speculative philosophy. The failure of this philosophy to discover universally valid laws resulted in widespread despair, which at times created a suicidal atmosphere. The other worldly promises offered by dualistic world models made an escape into an alternate world attractive. This paper investigates whether Nietzsche’s proposal to rekindle the fire of life by recovering the Dionysian spirit in creative work is a feasible alternative to nihilistic despair. It goes on to investigate (...)
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  7. Emotions et connaissance.Fabrice Teroni - 2014 - In Jean-Marie Chevalier Benoît Gautier (ed.), Connaître: Questions de philosophie contemporaine. Ithaque.
    Quel est le lien entre les émotions et la connaissance ? Selon une idée répandue, la réponse s’impose avec évidence : les émotions sont en rapport avec la connaissance dans la seule mesure où elles y font obstacle. Leur caractère disruptif, envahissant et sélectif empêcherait de raisonner correctement ou de poser un regard englobant et objectif sur les situations auxquelles nous faisons face. Je souhaite soutenir l’idée opposée, à savoir que les émotions permettent à ceux qui les ressentent d’entrer en (...)
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  8. War Without Virtue?Robert Sparrow - 2013 - In Bradley Jay Strawser (ed.), Killing By Remote Control. Oxford University Press. pp. 84-105.
    A number of recent and influential accounts of military ethics have argued that there exists a distinctive “role morality” for members of the armed services—a “warrior code.” A “good warrior” is a person who cultivates and exercises the “martial” or “warrior” virtues. By transforming combat into a “desk job” that can be conducted from the safety of the home territory of advanced industrial powers without need for physical strength or martial valour, long-range robotic weapons, such as the “Predator” and “Reaper” (...)
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  9. The Iteration Problem'.G. Cullity & Moral Character - 1995 - Utilitas 7 (2).
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  10. Can Virtue Be Taught?P. K. Wainaina - 1988 - In J. M. Nyasani (ed.), Philosophical Focus on Culture and Traditional Thought Systems in Development. Konrad Adenauer Foundation. pp. 316.
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  11. Moral Aspirations and Ideals.Saul Smilansky - 2010 - Utilitas 22 (3).
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  12. Virtue Ethics and Modern Society—A Response to the Thesis of the Modern Predicament of Virtue Ethics.Gong Qun - 2010 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (2):255-265.
    The revival of modern Western virtue ethics presents the question of whether or not virtue ethics is appropriate for modern society. Ethicists believe that virtue ethics came from traditional society, to which it conforms so well. The appearance of the market economy and a utilitarian spirit, together with society’s diversification, is a sign that modern society has arrived. This also indicates a transformation in the moral spirit. But modern society has not made virtues less important, and even as modern life (...)
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  13. The Shameless Truth: Shame and Friendship in Aristotle.M. K. Sokolon - 2013 - European Journal of Political Theory 12 (4):447-465.
    Does shame have a limited moral role because it is associated with a loss of self-respect or is it an important emotional support for socially beneficial behaviours? Aristotle supports the latter position. In his ethical theory, he famously claims that shame is a semi-virtue essential in the habituation of moral norms. He clarifies this role in the Rhetoric’s lesser-known distinction between true and conventional shame, which implies human beings make subjective evaluations of those appropriated cultural norms. Importantly, he locates this (...)
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  14. Hooker on Rule-Consequentialism and Virtue.Dale E. Miller - 2013 - Utilitas 25 (3):421-432.
    In Ideal Code, Real World, Brad Hooker proposes an account of the relation between his rule-consequentialism and virtue according to which the virtues (1) have intrinsic value and (2) are identical with the dispositions that are of the ideal code. While it is not clear whether Hooker actually intends to endorse this account or only intends to moot it for discussion, I argue that for him to adopt it would be a mistake. Not only would this mean that his moral (...)
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  15. Why Bad People Can't Be Good Friends.Alexis Elder - 2014 - Ratio 27 (1):84-99.
    Must the best friends necessarily be good people? On the one hand, as Aristotle puts it, ‘people think that the same people are good and also friends’. But on the other hand, friendship sometimes seems to require that one behave badly. For example, a normally honest person might lie to corroborate a friend's story. What I will call closeness, which I take to include sensitivity to friends' subjective values and concerns as well as an inclination to take their subjective interests (...)
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  16. Traditional Virtues and Contemporary Management.Howard Harris - 2007 - Philosophy of Management 6 (2):61-76.
    In the management domain the revival of interest in virtue ethics has been not so much in seeking a deeper understanding of the virtues themselves as in finding exemplars and pursuing the concept that virtue is a proper end of business. The aim of this paper is to show that a philosophical treatment of the great virtues can enlighten management understanding of them and to examine in more detail courage, love and wisdom. The paper includes an overview of the approach (...)
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  17. Virtue Beyond Reason.Ty Landrum - 2014 - Philosophical Investigations 37 (1):1-17.
    In the wake of Aristotle, it is often thought that moral virtue is a matter of feeling and acting for the right reasons. This notion is not incorrect, but it obscures one of the most interesting dimensions of virtue. It overlooks the formative role that virtue can play in bringing forth the kinds of considerations that count as reasons. To illustrate this point, I discuss some instances of love and resentment that are not plausibly conceived as responses to reasons, but (...)
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  18. The Truth-Value of the Aristotelian 'Areti'.Ioanna Patsioti-Tsacpounidis - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 2:165-172.
    This paper examines the concept of ‘areti’ as encountered in the Aristotelian ethical system in order to establish its relationship to the modern concept of virtue as well as to that of moral truth, that is, to identify its truth-value. I intend to show that the Aristotelian ‘areti’ as a developed state of character and as an advanced stage of ethical understanding entails moral truth. ‘Areti’ as a good-in-itself possesses an intrinsic value which reflects moral truth, and as a means (...)
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  19. Can Virtue Be Taught? ——The Angle of Epistemology.Guangquan Cheng - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 10:33-36.
    The predicament of contemporary moral education lies in the fact that we simply accepted Socrates "virtue is knowledge", and considered that the virtue can be taught as the knowledge, but we neglect that the virtue can only be cultivated in social practices. Some have realized that, but they only concentrated on revivification of the life scene in the class, such as KohlBerg's moral paradox, or class debate, leading the moral education to a debate skill and returning tothe style of Sophist (...)
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  20. Hope as a Virtue in an Aristotelian Context.Barbro Fröding - forthcoming - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (3):183-186.
    Michael Barilan’s article “From Hope in Palliative Care to Hope as a Virtue and a Life Skill” is an interesting and informative contribution to the debate on the nature of ‘a good death.’ Broadly speaking, the author seeks to explore “the roles and meanings of promotion focus goals in human life” and how hope can aid in alleviating suffering (Barilan 2012, 171). The subject is topical and courtesy of being clinically active, Barilan is able to add a welcome perspective. Very (...)
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  21. The Question of Ageing.John Cottingham - 2012 - Philosophical Papers 41 (3):371-396.
    Abstract For humans, as for other animal species, old age is a good, provided that the disease and decrepitude that often accompany it are not so severe as to swamp further flourishing. This accords with Aristotle's holistic account of flourishing, which embraces the entire biological lifespan. However, Aristotle's stress on rational activity as the key to human fulfilment suggests flourishing may be eroded in proportion as the intellectual faculties deteriorate. The Judeo-Christian tradition, by contrast, construes human flourishing primarily in terms (...)
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  22. Prudence Gone Wild.Nancy M. Rourke - 2011 - Environmental Ethics 33 (3):249-266.
    A Catholic environmental virtue ethic must include an understanding of prudence that incorporates attunement significantly. Catholic theologians are reluctant to revise notions of prudence, but there are traditions in theology that support such an approach. Catholic virtue ethical traditions point to this necessity, and, in addition, philosophical environmental virtue ethics (which are much more fully developed) simply insist on it. The comparison of a moral character (as it is understood in virtue ethics) with a bioregion’s ecosystem helps support this argument.
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  23. The Philosophy and Psychology of Virtue: An Empirical Approach to Character and Happiness.Snow Nancy & Trivigno Franco (eds.) - forthcoming - Routledge.
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  24. Hauerwas Among the Virtues.Jennifer A. Herdt - 2012 - Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (2):202-227.
    Despite the fact that Stanley Hauerwas has not taken up many of the topics normally associated with virtue ethics, has explicitly distanced himself from the enterprise known as “virtue ethics,” and throughout his career has preferred other categories of analysis, ranging from character and agency to practices and liturgy, it is nevertheless clear that his work has had a deep and transformative impact on the recovery of virtue within Christian ethics, and that this impact has largely to do with the (...)
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  25. Character Traits, Virtues, and Vices.Michael DePaul - 2000 - The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 9:141-157.
    Recently, Gilbert Harman has used empirical results obtained by social psychologists to argue that there are no character traits of the type presupposed by virtue ethics—no honesty or dishonesty, no courage or cowardice, in short, no virtue or vice. In this paper, I critically assess his argument as well as that of the social psychologists he appeals to. I suggest that the experimental results recounted by Harman would not much concern such classical virtue theorists as Plato—particularly the Plato of the (...)
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  26. Morality.Charles Lowney - 2009 - Tradition and Discovery 36 (3):52-65.
    New moral ways of being are answers to fundamental problems in the human condition regarding the best way to be and the best way to be with each other. Entering a new way of being entails crossing a logical gap into a new interpretive framework. Michael Polanyi’s from-to structure of knowing and discovery is used to show both how we can acquire the state of the good person through an imitation of their behaviors and why those behaviors must be practiced (...)
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  27. Friendship as an Impersonal Value.Todd Lekan - 2010 - Southwest Philosophy Review 26 (1):71-79.
    This paper defends a broadly Aristotelean account of character friendship that maintains that the impersonal value of acquiring a virtuous character is the ultimate basis for our reasons for caring about friends. This view of friendship appears to conflict with the entrenched intuition that viewing our connections to particular friends as merely contingent occasions for the cultivation of virtue is alienating and undesirable. I argue that far from being an alienating feature of character friendships, a focused appreciation of the contingent (...)
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  28. Hursthouse's Virtue Ethics, the Slide Into Consequentialism, and the Problem of Instrumentally Successful Vice.Mark Piper - 2010 - Southwest Philosophy Review 26 (1):81-90.
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  29. Nature, Virtue, and the Nature of Virtue.C. D. Meyers - 2010 - Southwest Philosophy Review 26 (1):109-117.
    Most of the philosophical work written on environmental issues focuses on notions such as rights, consequences, duties, etc. And most of the theoretical philosophy done in environmental ethics focuses on questions of whether animals, plants, or ecosystems have inherent value or moral standing independently of their usefulness to humans. A character-based approach has been largely neglected (despite a few important works). In this paper, I consider what a plausible environmental virtue ethics would look like. Specifically, I argue (pace Sandler) that (...)
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  30. Culture and the Specification of Environmental Virtue.Ronald Sandler - 2003 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 10 (2):63-68.
    One concern about a virtue ethics approach to environmental ethics is that virtue ethics lack the theoretical resources to provide a specification of environmental virtue that does not pander to obtaining cultural practices and conceptions of the human-nature relationship. In this paper I argue that this concern is unfounded.
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  31. Virtue Ethics: A Pluralistic View.Christine Swanton - 2003 - Clarendon Press.
    Christine Swanton offers a new, comprehensive theory of virtue ethics which addresses the major concerns of modern ethical theory from a character-based perspective. The book departs in significant ways from classical virtue ethics and neo-Aristotelianism, employing insights from Nietzsche and other sources, resulting in a highly distinctive and original brand of virtue ethics.
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  32. Drunken Role Models: Rescuing Our Sporting Exemplars.Carwyn Jones - 2011 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 5 (4):414 - 432.
    It is often claimed that elite professional athletes are role models and as such have certain duties to behave in morally appropriate ways. The argument is that given their influential status and influence, they should be good examples rather than bad ones. In relation to alcohol consumption and the problematic behaviours associated with excessive consumption, many professional athletes are bad role models. They consume too much and behave badly. Drawing on neo-Aristotelian insights I argue the following. First, persons who exhibit (...)
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  33. Happiness, Virtue and Tyranny.Matthew Pianalto - 2008 - Philosophy Now 68:6-9.
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  34. Two Dilemmas in Virtue Ethics and How Zhu Xi's Neo-Confucianism Avoids Them.Yong Huang - 2011 - Journal of Philosophical Research 36:247-281.
    Virtue ethics has become an important rival to deontology and consequentialism, the two dominant moral theories in modern Western philosophy. What unites various forms of virtue ethics and distinguishes virtue ethics from its rivals is its emphasis on the primacy of virtue. In this article, I start with an explanation of the primacy of virtue in virtue ethics and two dilemmas, detected by Gary Watson, that virtue ethics faces: (1) virtue ethics may maintain the primacy of virtue and thus leave (...)
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  35. The Advantages of Civic Friendship.Joyce L. Jenkins - 1999 - Journal of Philosophical Research 24:459-471.
    Aristotle distinguishes three types of friendship: virtue or character friendship, advantage friendship, and pleasure friendship. He also holds that the civic relation is a friendship, but it is unclear to which of the three types it belongs. There appear to be two candidates. It is either a character friendship, or an advantage friendship. I argue that it cannot be a character friendship, since that would entail that citizens have active goodwill toward one another, and Aristotle claims that such goodwill can (...)
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  36. Natural Law, End, And Virtue In Aquinas.John Peterson - 1999 - Journal of Philosophical Research 24:397-413.
    Natural law in Aquinas shares the essential features of law in general: it belongs to mind and stands between end and activity. The mind here is the human mind, the end is happiness which is the natural end of persons as persons and the activity is virtuous activity. The latter is activity that accords with reason. Virtue is called for by the natural law. That is because a) virtue is the habit that inclines persons to rational activity, b) persons are (...)
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  37. Aristotle, Success, and Moral Luck.Paul Farwell - 1994 - Journal of Philosophical Research 19:37-50.
    My point of departure is Bernard WiIliams’ “moral luck” thesis and its claim that luck and success are an integral part of ethics. Some scholars think AristotIe’s ethics lends support to a version of the moral luck thesis. My claim is the exact opposite: Aristotle gives a subtle and interesting argument for keeping luck and ethics distinct. Luck plays Iittle role since the moral worth of action Iies in the agent’s choice, proairesis, not merely in the quality of the act (...)
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  38. Toward an Ontology of Virtue Ethics.Mary Ella Savarino - 1993 - Journal of Philosophical Research 18:243-259.
    Although ethicists are increasingly interested in virtue ethics, very little has been written about the nature of virtue. Yet understanding it is crucial for understanding virtue ethics. Some philosophers of science claim that virtue is a property reducible to the mere disposition to behave in certain specified ways given a particular situation. A virtue is correctly ascribed after the observation of the relevant behavior. This view reverses the classical virtue ethics of Aristotle. For him, behavior is identified as virtuous in (...)
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  39. Creation, Redemption and Virtue.Caleb Miller - 1999 - Faith and Philosophy 16 (3):368-377.
    In this paper, I defend the claim that Christian theology gives us good reason to think that virtue is relative to individuals and communities, i.e., that what character traits are virtues for individuals is relative to individuals and to the communities of which they are members. I begin by reviewing the theological claims that I take to be relevant. I then argue that these claims make it plausible to conclude that virtue is morally redemptive and therefore relative to individuals and (...)
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  40. Rightness and Goodness in Agent-Based Virtue Ethics.Liezl van Zyl - 2011 - Journal of Philosophical Research 36:103-114.
    In Morals from Motives (2001) Michael Slote puts forward an agent-based virtue ethics that purports to derive an account of deontic terms from aretaic evaluations of motives or character traits. In this view, an action is right if and only if it proceeds from a good or virtuous motive or at least does not come from a bad motive, and wrong if it comes from a bad motive. I argue that Slote does not provide an account of right action at (...)
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  41. The Virtues (and a Few Vices) of Daniel Russell's Practical Intelligence and the Virtues.Christopher Toner - 2011 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (3):453-468.
    Daniel Russell's Practical Intelligence and the Virtues is principally a defense of the Aristotelian claim that phronesis is part of every unqualified virtue—a defense of what Russell calls "hard virtue theory" and "hard virtue ethics." The main support for this is the further claim that we would be unable to act well reliably, or form our character reliably, without phronesis performing its "twin roles": correctly identifying the mean of each virtue, and integrating the mean of each virtue with those of (...)
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  42. Animal Rights: A Non‐Consequentialist Approach.Uriah Kriegel - 2013 - In K. Petrus & M. Wild (eds.), Animal Minds and Animal Ethics. Transcript.
    It is a curious fact about mainstream discussions of animal rights that they are dominated by consequentialist defenses thereof, when consequentialism in general has been on the wane in other areas of moral philosophy. In this paper, I describe an alternative, non‐consequentialist ethical framework and argue that it grants animals more expansive rights than consequentialist proponents of animal rights typically grant. The cornerstone of this non‐consequentialist framework is the thought that the virtuous agent is s/he who has the stable and (...)
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  43. Virtuous Choice and Parity.Martin Peterson & Barbro Fröding - 2012 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (1):71-82.
    This article seeks to contribute to the discussion on the nature of choice in virtue theory. If several different actions are available to the virtuous agent, they are also likely to vary in their degree of virtue, at least in some situations. Yet, it is widely agreed that once an action is recognised as virtuous there is no higher level of virtue. In this paper we discuss how the virtue theorist could accommodate both these seemingly conflicting ideas. We discuss this (...)
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  44. Foundations of Moral Selfhood.Gerard Casey - 2006 - Review of Metaphysics 59 (4):877-878.
  45. Humility: From Sacred Virtue to Secular Vice?Eve Garrard & David McNaughton - unknown
    Some of the virtues have a very stable place in our understanding of goodness – beneficence and courage are unlikely ever to lose their high standing. But other virtues have something like a life cycle: they move from a marginal status to to a central one, and sometimes they move back again to the margins, or even beyond the domain of virtue altogether. Chastity is one example of this; humility is another. There was a period in which humility wasn’t a (...)
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  46. Thomas Hurka, Virtue, Vice, and Value , Pp. Ix + 272.Julia Driver - 2006 - Utilitas 18 (2):190.
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  47. Freedom and Virtue in Politics: Some Aspects of Character, Circumstances and Utility From Helvétius to J. S. Mill.G. W. Smith - 1989 - Utilitas 1 (1):112.
    Writing in the foreword to Allan Bloom's The Closing of the American Mind and speaking of his upbringing in Chicago between the wars Saul Bellow attests that …as a Midwesterner, the son of immigrant parents, I recognized at an early stage that I was called upon to decide for myself to what extent my Jewish origins, my surroundings [‘the accidental circumstances of Chicago’], my schooling, were to be allowed to determine the course of my life. I did not intend to (...)
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  48. Virtue Ethics and the Problem of Indirection: A Pluralistic Value-Centred Approach.Christine Swanton - 1997 - Utilitas 9 (2):167.
    Many forms of virtue ethics, like certain forms of utilitarianism, suffer from the problem of indirection. In those forms, the criterion for status of a trait as a virtue is not the same as the criterion for the status of an act as right. Furthermore, if the virtues for example are meant to promote the nourishing of the agent, the virtuous agent is not standardly supposed to be motivated by concern for her own flourishing in her activity. In this paper, (...)
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  49. Rosalind Hursthouse, Gavin Lawrence and Warren Quinn, Eds., Virtues and Reasons: Philippa Foot and Moral Theory, Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1995, Pp. Vii + 350.Julia Driver - 1997 - Utilitas 9 (3):366.
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  50. Introduction.Julia Driver - 2001 - Utilitas 13 (2):137.
    The evaluation of character has taken on new significance in moral theory, and, indeed, some advocate a shift in focus away from evaluating action to evaluating character. This has been taken to pose special challenges for utilitarian and consequentialist moral theory. Utilitarianism's commitment to impartiality and its seeming failure to accommodate virtue evaluation have led to problems, some of which are developed in the essays in this volume.
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