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  1. Would Legalizing Torture Result in Too Many Cases of Torture? Rare Counterexamples.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    The economist David K. Levine claims that if a government of a country makes torture legal, the inevitable result will be torture that is out of control. I point out an inconsistency in his approach to torture. I then argue that we should be open to rare counterexamples to his claim and describe a kind of counterexample.
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  2. Violations of Human Dignity.Webster Elaine & Kaufmann Paulus (eds.) - forthcoming - Springer.
  3. Torture. How Denying Moral Standing Violates Human Dignity.Andreas Maier - forthcoming - In Webster Elaine & Kaufmann Paulus (eds.), Violations of Human Dignity. Springer.
    In this article I try to elucidate the concept of human dignity by taking a closer look at the features of a paradigmatic torture situation. After identifying the salient aspects of torture, I discuss various accounts for the moral wrongness of such acts and argue that what makes torture a violation of human dignity is the perverted moral relationship between torturer and victim. This idea is subsequently being substantiated and defended against important objections. In the final part of the chapter (...)
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  4. The prevention of torture: An ecological approach.Romand Coles - 2021 - Contemporary Political Theory 20 (2):86-89.
  5. Distributed agency, responsibility and preventing grave wrongs.Danielle Celermajer - 2020 - Contemporary Political Theory 19 (2):188-210.
    Despite the theoretical uptake of ontological schemas that do not tie agency uniquely to individual humans, these new ontological geographies have had little penetration when it comes to designing institutions to prevent grave wrongs. Moreover, our persistent intuitions tie agency and responsibility to individuals within a figuration of blame. This article seeks to connect new materialist and actor network theories with the design of institutions that seek to prevent torture. It argues that although research into the causes and conditions of (...)
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  6. What Can Be Asked of Interrogators?”.Michael Skerker - 2020 - In Interrogation and Torture: Efficacy, Morality, and Law. Oxford, UK:
    The article assesses different models of professional ethics and develops a model which sees professional imperatives as the institutionally-guided expression of foundational moral principles. This article uses the model to assess the moral pressures placed on interrogators in undercover operations in which a detective poses as a suspect in pre-arraignment holding. While highly effective, the level of empathetic rapport required risks incurring compassion fatigue and burn out on the part of detectives.
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  7. Comment les sept sociopathes qui gouvernent la Chine gagnent la troisième guerre mondiale et trois façons de les arrêter.Michael Richard Starks - 2020 - In Bienvenue en Enfer sur Terre : Bébés, Changement climatique, Bitcoin, Cartels, Chine, Démocratie, Diversité, Dysgénique, Égalité, Pirates informatiques, Droits de l'homme, Islam, Libéralisme, Prospérité, Le Web, Chaos, Famine, Maladie, Violence, Intellige. Las Vegas, NV, USA: Reality Press. pp. 347-358.
    La première chose que nous devons garder à l’esprit est que lorsque nous disons que la Chine dit ceci ou la Chine fait cela, nous ne parlons pas du peuple chinois, mais des sociopathes qui contrôlent le PCC -- Parti communiste chinois, c’est-à-dire, les sept tueurs en série sociopathes seniles (SSSSK) du Comité permanent du PCC ou des 25 membres du Politburo etc. Les plans du PCC pour la Seconde Guerre mondiale et la domination totale sont énoncés très clairement dans (...)
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  8. Prison as a Torturous Institution.Jessica Wolfendale - 2020 - Res Philosophica 97 (2):297-324.
    Prison as a Torturous Institution Philosophers working on torture have largely failed to address the widespread use of torture in the U.S. prison system. Drawing on a victim-focused definition of torture, I argue that the U.S. prison system is a torturous institution in which direct torture occurs (the use of solitary confinement) and in which torture is allowed to occur through the toleration of sexual assault of inmates and the conditions of mass incarceration. The use and toleration of torture expresses (...)
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  9. Torture with Consent.Terence Rajivan Edward - 2019 - Philosophical Pathways (230):1-3.
    There are attempts to define torture which say that a person is only being tortured if the pain inflicted upon them is pain that they have not consented to. In this very brief paper, I recommend that we define torture without this condition.
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  10. War Crimes: Causes, Excuses, and Blame Matthew Talbert & Jessica Wolfendale New York, Oxford University Press, 2019 X + 168 Pp, $74.00. [REVIEW]Benjamin Matheson - 2019 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 36 (5):844-846.
  11. The Making of a Torturer.Jessica Wolfendale - 2019 - In Suzanne C. Knittel & Zachary J. Goldberg (eds.), The Routledge International Handbook of Perpetrator Studies.
    Liberal democracies who perpetrate torture represent an apparent paradox: a flagrant violation of human rights by states supposedly dedicated to protecting human rights. In liberal democracies, the political, social, and legal narratives used to justify torture portray torture as an individual act motivated by important moral values. This individualized torture narrative then shapes the moral framework through which the public, policy-makers, and individual torturers view torture, and masks the institutional nature of torture perpetration. It is this interaction between an individualized (...)
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  12. Clinical Care and Complicity with Torture.Zackary Berger, Leonard Rubenstein & Matt Decamp - 2018 - British Medical Journal 360:k449.
    The UN Convention against Torture defines torture as “any act by which severe pain or suffering, whether physical or mental, is intentionally inflicted on a person” by someone acting in an official capacity for purposes such as obtaining a confession or punishing or intimidating that person.1 It is unethical for healthcare professionals to participate in torture, including any use of medical knowledge or skill to facilitate torture or allow it to continue, or to be present during torture.2-7 Yet medical participation (...)
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  13. Musical Worlds and the Extended Mind.Joel Krueger - 2018 - Proceedings of A Body of Knowledge - Embodied Cognition and the Arts Conference CTSA UCI, 8-10 Dec 2016.
    “4E” approaches in cognitive science see mind as embodied, embedded, enacted, and extended. They observe that we routinely “offload” part of our thinking onto body and world. Recently, 4E theorists have turned to music cognition: from work on music perception and musical emotions, to improvisation and music education. I continue this trend. I argue that music — like other tools and technologies — is a beyond-the-head resource that affords offloading. And via this offloading, music can (at least potentially) scaffold various (...)
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  14. Uncertainty and Control.Sven Ove Hansson - 2017 - Diametros 53:50-59.
    In a decision making context, an agent’s uncertainty can be either epistemic, i.e. due to her lack of knowledge, or agentive, i.e. due to her not having made use of her decision-making power. In cases when it is unclear whether or not a decision maker presently has control over her own future actions, it is difficult to determine whether her uncertainty is epistemic or agentive. Such situations are often difficult for the agent to deal with, but from an outsider’s perspective, (...)
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  15. Legitimating Torture?Gerald Lang - 2017 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 11 (2):331-349.
    Steinhoff defends the moral and legal permissibility of torture in a limited range of circumstances. This article criticizes Steinhoff’s arguments. The analogy between ordinary defensive violence and defensive torture which Steinhoff argues for is partly spoiled by the presence, within defensive torture, of opportunistic harm, in addition to eliminative harm. Steinhoff’s arguments that the mere legalization of defensive torture would not metastasize into a more full-fledged institutionalization of torture are also found wanting. As a minimal form of institutionalization, the mere (...)
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  16. Is Corporal Punishment Torturous?Patrick Lenta - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (1):74-88.
    The aim of this article is to determine whether fixed courses of judicial corporal punishment and non-abusive corporal punishment of children amount to torture. I assess the reasons that have been offered for distinguishing fixed courses of JCP from torture and argue that none is successful. I argue that non-consensual JCP that inflicts severe pain is appropriately classifiable as torture, but that JCP that inflicts mild pain and entirely consensual JCP are not torturous. I consider whether any of the reasons (...)
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  17. Putting the War Back in Just War Theory: A Critique of Examples.Rigstad Mark - 2017 - Ethical Perspectives 24 (1):123-144.
    Analytic just war theorists often attempt to construct ideal theories of military justice on the basis of intuitions about imaginary and sometimes outlandish examples, often taken from non-military contexts. This article argues for a sharp curtailment of this method and defends, instead, an empirically and historically informed approach to the ethical scrutiny of armed conflicts. After critically reviewing general philosophical reasons for being sceptical of the moral-theoretic value of imaginary hypotheticals, the article turns to some of the special problems that (...)
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  18. Nepomuceno, Eric. A Memória de Todos Nós. [REVIEW]César Schirmer Dos Santos - 2017 - Peri 9 (1):262-266.
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  19. Torture and Confession in the Templar Interrogations at Caen, 28–29 October 1307.Sean L. Field - 2016 - Speculum 91 (2):297-327.
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  20. Torture and Dignity: An Essay on Moral Injury. [REVIEW]Jeremy Gauger - 2016 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 37 (1):191-194.
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  21. Rebecca Gordon, Mainstreaming Torture: Ethical Approaches in the Post-9/11 United States. Reviewed By.Pramod K. Nayar - 2016 - Philosophy in Review 36 (4):168-169.
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  22. Fighting Hurt: Rule and Exception in Torture and War.Henry Shue - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Some of our most fundamental moral rules are violated by the practices of torture and war. If one examines the concrete forms these practices take, can the exceptions to the rules necessary to either torture or war be justified? Fighting Hurt brings together key essays by Henry Shue on the issue of torture, and relatedly, the moral challenges surrounding the initiation and conduct of war, and features a new introduction outlining the argument of the essays, putting them into context, and (...)
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  23. Torture, Dignity, and Humiliation.Jan‐Willem van der Rijt - 2016 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 54 (4):480-501.
    Several recent analyses of torture focus on the humiliation torture inflicts on the victim as the principal evil inherent in torture. This paper challenges this focus by arguing that the connection between torture and humiliation is not a necessary one. Though it is true that most contemporary usages of torture humiliate, it is shown that this is dependent on both the context of the torture and the specific means of torture applied. It is demonstrated that, in certain circumstances, torture is (...)
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  24. The “Good” Psychologist, “Good” Torture, and “Good” Reputation—Response to O’Donohue, Snipes, Dalto, Soto, Maragakis, and Im “The Ethics of Enhanced Interrogations and Torture”.Jean Maria Arrigo, David DeBatto, Lawrence Rockwood & Timothy G. Mawe - 2015 - Ethics and Behavior 25 (5):361-372.
    O’Donohue et al. sought to derive, from classical ethical theories, the ethical obligation of psychologists to assist “enhanced interrogations and torture” in national defense scenarios under strict EIT criteria. They asked the American Psychological Association to adopt an ethics code obligating psychologists to assist such EIT and to uphold the reputation of EIT psychologists. We contest the authors’ ethical analyses as supports for psychologists’ forays into torture interrogation when the EIT criteria obtain. We also contend that the authors’ application of (...)
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  25. The Kantian Case Against Torture.Peter Brian Barry - 2015 - Philosophy 90 (4):593-621.
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  26. Interrogating the ‘Ticking Bomb Scenario’: Reassessing the Thought Experiment.Simon Beck & Stephen de Wijze - 2015 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 29 (1):53-70.
    The aim of this paper is to re-evaluate the manner in which the Ticking Bomb Scenario (TBS), a thought experiment in philosophical enquiry, has been used in the discussion of the justifiability or otherwise of forward-looking interrogational torture (FLIT). The paper argues that criticisms commonly raised against the thought experiment are often inappropriate or irrelevant. A great many criticisms misunderstand the way in which thought experiments in general, and the TBS in particular, are supposed to work in philosophical (and for (...)
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  27. The Ethics of Torture-Lite.Ross W. Bellaby - 2015 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 29 (2):177-190.
    Torture-lite has been advanced as a new form of interrogation that raises the prospect of offering a more ethical way of colleting the intelligence needed to protect the state. However, this paper will argue that there can be no such thing as torture-lite as this misunderstands what interrogational torture is in the first place. Interrogational torture is a form of behavioural modification that relies on breaking the individual and conditioning their responses. Torture-lite would never be able to create the self-betraying (...)
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  28. Torture and Dignity: An Essay on Moral Injury.J. M. Bernstein - 2015 - University of Chicago Press.
    In this unflinching look at the experience of suffering and one of its greatest manifestations—torture—J.M. Bernstein critiques the repressions of traditional moral theory, showing that our morals are not immutable ideals but fragile constructions that depend on our experience of suffering itself. Morals, Bernstein argues, not only guide our conduct but also express the depth of mutual dependence that we share as vulnerable and injurable individuals. Beginning with the attempts to abolish torture in the eighteenth century, and then sensitively examining (...)
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  29. Saubere Folter: Auf den Spuren unsichtbarer Gewalt.Carola Hilbrand - 2015 - Bielefeld: Transcript.
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  30. Torture, Evil and Moral Development.Darcia Narvaez - 2015 - Journal of Moral Education 44 (1):1-16.
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  31. The Subject of Torture: Psychoanalysis and Biopolitics in Television and Film.Hilary Neroni - 2015 - Cambridge University Press.
    Considering representations of torture in such television series as _24_,_ Alias_, and _Homeland_; the documentaries _Taxi to the Dark Side_, _Ghosts of Abu Ghraib_, and _Standard Operating Procedure_ ; and "torture porn" feature films from the Saw and Hostel series, Hilary Neroni unites aesthetic and theoretical analysis to provide a unique portal into theorizing biopower and its relation to the desiring subject. Her work ultimately showcases film and television studies' singular ability to expose and potentially disable the fantasies that sustain (...)
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  32. Does Torture Work?John W. Schiemann - 2015 - Oxford University Press USA.
    When the Senate released its so-called "Torture Report" in December 2014 the world would learn that, for years, the CIA had used unimaginably brutal methods to interrogate its prisoners - often without yielding any useful or truthful information. The agency had long and adamantly defended its use of torture, staunchly arguing that it was not only just but necessary for the country's safety. And even amid the revelations of the report, questions abound about whether torture can be considered a justifiable (...)
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  33. Review: Rebecca Gordon, Mainstreaming Torture: Ethical Approaches in the Post-9/11 United States. [REVIEW]David Sussman - 2015 - Ethics 126 (1):225-230.
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  34. Review: Rebecca Gordon, Mainstreaming Torture: Ethical Approaches in the Post-9/11 United States. [REVIEW]Review by: David Sussman - 2015 - Ethics 126 (1):225-230.
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  35. Ticking Time-Bombs and Torture1.Fritz Allhoff - 2014 - In Andrew I. Cohen & Christopher H. Wellman (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Applied Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 22--247.
    The general consensus among philosophers is that the use of torture is never justified. In Terrorism, Ticking Time-Bombs, and Torture, Fritz Allhoff demonstrates the weakness of the case against torture; while allowing that torture constitutes a moral wrong, he nevertheless argues that, in exceptional cases, it represents the lesser of two evils. Allhoff does not take this position lightly. He begins by examining the way terrorism challenges traditional norms, discussing the morality of various practices of torture, and critically exploring the (...)
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  36. Empathy and Interrogation.Mavis Biss - 2014 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (2):277-288.
    Against the background of not-so-distant debate regarding “enhanced” interrogation techniques used by the United States during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, which many understand to be torture, this essay explores the moral complexities of “ordinary” interrogation practices, those that are clearly not forms of torture. Based on analysis of the written reflections of two United States interrogators on the work they did during the Iraq war, I categorize the roles played by multiple modes of empathy within interrogation and argue (...)
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  37. Torture and its Apologists.Bob Brecher - 2014 - In Andrew I. Cohen & Christopher H. Wellman (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Applied Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 22--260.
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  38. Mainstreaming Torture: Ethical Approaches in the Post-9/11 United States.Rebecca Gordon - 2014 - Oup Usa.
    The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 reopened what many Americans had assumed was a settled ethical question: Is torture ever morally permissible? Rebecca Gordon argues that institutionalized state torture remains as wrong today as it was before those terrible attacks, and shows how U.S. practices during the ''war on terror'' are rooted in a history that includes support for torture regimes abroad and for the use of torture in the jails and prisons of this country.
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  39. Torture – Does Timing Matter?Caspar Hare - 2014 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 11 (4):385-394.
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  40. Book Review: Ethics for Enemies: Terror, Torture, and War, Written by F.M. Kamm. [REVIEW]J. Jeremy Wisnewski - 2014 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 11 (5):657-660.
  41. Torture and Moral Integrity: A Philosophical Enquiry.Matthew H. Kramer - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    The morality of interrogational torture has been the subject of heated debate in recent years. In explaining why torture is morally wrong, Kramer engages in deep philosophical reflections on the nature of morality and on moral conflicts.
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  42. Torture, Power, and Law.David Luban - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    This volume brings together the most important writing on torture and the 'war on terror by one of the leading US voices in the torture debate. Philosopher and legal ethicist David Luban reflects on this contentious topic in a powerful sequence of essays including two new and previously unpublished pieces. He analyzes the trade-offs between security and human rights, as well as the connection between torture, humiliation, and human dignity, the fallacy of using ticking bomb scenarios in debates about torture, (...)
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  43. Screening Torture: Media Representations of State Terror and Political Domination.Simona Mitroiu - 2014 - The European Legacy 19 (5):663-664.
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  44. The Ticking Time Bomb: When the Use of Torture Is and Is Not Endorsed.Joseph Spino & Denise Dellarosa Cummins - 2014 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (4):543-563.
    Although standard ethical views categorize intentional torture as morally wrong, the ticking time bomb scenario is frequently offered as a legitimate counter-example that justifies the use of torture. In this scenario, a bomb has been placed in a city by a terrorist, and the only way to defuse the bomb in time is to torture a terrorist in custody for information. TTB scenarios appeal to a utilitarian “greater good” justification, yet critics maintain that the utilitarian structure depends on a questionable (...)
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  45. Allhoff, Fritz. Terrorism, Ticking Time-Bombs, and Torture: A Philosophical Analysis: Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2012. Pp. 280. $35.00. [REVIEW]Peter Brian Barry - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (3):675-676.
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  46. Demokratische Körper: Die Abschaffung der Folter Und der Aufstand des Rechtsstaats.Jay Bernstein - 2013 - Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 61 (5-6):665-680.
    Moral modernity, including political modernity, is founded on the series of acts whereby, throughout Europe, torture was banned. Torture became the paradigm of moral injury, of what must never be done to an individual because it is intrinsically degrading and devaluing. The body of the torture victim is the meeting place of state and citizen: either the rule of law recognizes bodily autonomy as its own moral basis - broken laws standing for broken bodies - or the law becomes a (...)
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  47. Torture.Vittorio Bufacchi - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  48. Book ReviewsAllhoff, Fritz. Terrorism, Ticking Time-Bombs, and Torture: A Philosophical Analysis.Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2012. Pp. Xii+266. $35.00. [REVIEW]Philip Devine - 2013 - Ethics 123 (2):346-349.
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  49. The Prohibition of Torture in Exceptional Circumstances.Michelle Farrell - 2013 - Cambridge University Press.
    Can torture be justified in exceptional circumstances? In this timely work, Michelle Farrell asks how and why this question has become such a central debate. She argues that the ticking bomb scenario is a fiction which blinds us to the reality of torture and investigates what it is that that scenario fails to represent. Farrell aims to reframe how we think about torture, and critically reflects on the historical and contemporary approaches to its use in exceptional situations. She demonstrates how (...)
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  50. Torture Porn: Popular Horror After Saw.Steve Jones - 2013 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Torture Porn is a term that has generated a great deal of controversy during the last decade, critics utilizing the term to dismiss contemporary popular horror cinema as obscene and morally depraved. Arguing primarily in defense of torture-themed horror films, this book seeks to offer a critical overview and examination of the Torture Porn phenomenon, discussing the generic contexts in which it is situated, scrutinizing press responses to the sub-genre, and offering narrative analyses of the sub-genre’s central films; including the (...)
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