About this topic
Summary This category covers discussions of various relevant topics associated with Latinas in the U.S.  Some of these topics include the importance of lived experience in theorizing selfhood and identity, intersectional analyses of the condition of U.S Latinas (analyses that take into consideration the intersection between race, class, gender, sexuality, nationality, religion  and other axes of oppression),  cross-cultural communication, relationship between women of color feminisms and white feminisms as well as development of theories of resistance to oppression and  of coalitions across differences.  The category includes philosophical writings as well as interdisciplinary writings that make use of a plurality of methodologies.
Key works Latina feminism owes a great deal to the work of Chicana theorist Gloria Anzaldúa, specifically her 1987 groundbreaking work Borderlands/La Frontera, The New Mestiza (Anzaldúa 1987). Key works by Latina feminist philosophers  include Lugones 2003, Alcoff 2006 and Schutte 1998. For a recent cluster on Latina feminism from a philosophical perspective see Ortega 2016. For a general introduction to Latina feminisms see Ortega 2015.
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204 found
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1 — 50 / 204
  1. Comparative Race, Comparative Racisms (2007).Linda Martin Alcoff - manuscript
  2. Radical Multiculturalism and Women of Color Feminisms.María Lugones - forthcoming - Revista Internacional de Filosofía Política.
  3. Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance.Andrea Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.) - forthcoming - Oxford University Press.
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  4. Women of Color Structural Feminisms.Elena Ruíz - forthcoming - In Shirley-Anne Tate (ed.), The Palgrave Handbook on Critical Race And Gender.
    One way to track the many critical impacts of women of color feminisms is through the powerful structural analyses of gendered and racialized oppression they offer. This article discusses diverse lineages of women of color feminisms in the global South that tackle systemic structures of power and domination from their situated perspectives. It offers an introduction to structuralist theories in the humanities and differentiates them from women of color feminist theorizing, which begins analyses of structures from embodied and phenomenological st¬¬andpoints--with (...)
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  5. Between Hermeneutic Violence and Alphabets of Survival.Elena Ruíz - forthcoming - In Andrea Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press.
  6. Gloria Anzaldúa as Philosopher: The Early Years.Mariana Alessandri - 2020 - Philosophy Compass 15 (7).
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  7. Toward a Decolonial Feminist Anticapitalism: María Lugones, Sylvia Wynter, and Sayak Valencia.Ashley J. Bohrer - 2020 - Hypatia 35 (3):524-541.
    This article traces the centrality of capitalism in the work of three decolonial feminists: María Lugones, Sylvia Wynter, and Sayek Valencia. Elaborating on the role of capitalism in each of their work separately, I argue that each of these thinkers conceptualizes capitalism in a novel and urgent way, charting new directions for both theory and social movement practice. I thus argue that the decolonial feminist tradition holds crucial philosophical and historical resources for understanding the emergence of capitalism and its endurance.
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  8. Privileged Ignorance, “World”-Traveling, and Epistemic Tourism.Melanie Bowman - 2020 - Hypatia 35 (3):475-489.
    In this article I am concerned with how relatively privileged people who wish to act in anti-oppressive ways respond to their own ignorance in ways that fall short of what is necessary for building coalitions against oppression. I consider María Lugones's sense of “world”-travel and José Medina's notion of epistemic friction-seeking as strategies for combating privileged ignorance, and assess how well they fare when put into practice by those suffering from privileged ignorance. Drawing on the resources of tourism studies, I (...)
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  9. Teaching Gloria E. Anzaldúa: Pedagogy and Practice for Our Classrooms and Communities.Margaret Cantú-Sánchez, Candace de León-Zepeda & Norma Elia Cantú (eds.) - 2020
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  10. After the Hurricane: Afro-Latina Decolonial Feminisms and Destierro.Yomaira Figueroa - 2020 - Hypatia 35 (1):220-229.
    The first version of this piece was written for the opening panel of the 2017 Conference of the Association for Feminist Ethics and Social Theory in Florida. The panel, “Decolonial Feminism: Theories and Praxis,” offered the opportunity for Black and Latinx feminist philosophers and decolonial scholars to consider their arrival to decolonial feminisms, their various points of emergence, and the utility of decolonial politics for liberation movements and organizing. I was prepared to discuss some genealogies of US Latina decolonial feminisms (...)
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  11. Traveling the Soil of Worlds: Haunted Forgettings and Opaque Memories.Ege Selin Islekel - 2020 - Hypatia 35 (3):439-453.
    This essay works on the role of trauma and forgetting in the subjective formations of the world-traveler and la nueva mestiza. I investigate how forgetting affects the resistant capacities of these figures. I argue throughout that the memory of the world-traveler is an opaque memory, which is unintelligible for the hegemonic demands of transparency, and which forms the silt upon which the resistant possibilities of the world-traveler rest. The first part elaborates María Lugones's conception of world-traveling in relation to Gloria (...)
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  12. The Colonial/Modern [Cis]Gender System and Trans World Traveling.Brooklyn Leo - 2020 - Hypatia 35 (3):454-474.
    Trans of Color inclusion is not simply a gesture of affectionate commitment to María Lugones's theory of impure communities. Rather, it is required for the enactment of her liberatory theory within and across communities of color. While María Lugones's historico-theoretical analysis of the colonial/modern gender system relies upon anthropological citations of Native gender and sexual diversity, she argues that we must bracket gender for the benefit of [cis]women of color feminisms. However, if this bracketing does not first carefully uncover cisgender (...)
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  13. Cultural Gaslighting.Elena Ruíz - 2020 - Hypatia 35 (4):687-713.
    This essay frames systemic patterns of mental abuse against women of color and Indigenous women on Turtle Island (North America) in terms of larger design-of-distribution strategies in settler colonial societies, as these societies use various forms of social power to distribute, reproduce, and automate social inequalities (including public health precarities and mortality disadvantages) that skew socio-economic gain continuously toward white settler populations and their descendants. It departs from traditional studies in gender-based violence research that frame mental abuses such as gaslighting--commonly (...)
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  14. Teaching Gloria Anzaldúa as an American Philosopher.Alexander Stehn - 2020 - In Margaret Cantú-Sánchez, Candace de León-Zepeda & Norma Elia Cantú (eds.), Teaching Gloria E. Anzaldúa: Pedagogy and Practice for Our Classrooms and Communities. pp. 296-313.
    Many of my first students at Anzaldúa’s alma mater read Borderlands/La Frontera and concluded that Anzaldúa was not a philosopher. Hostile comments suggested that Anzaldúa’s intimately personal and poetic ways of writing were not philosophical. In response, I created “American Philosophy and Self-Culture” using backwards course design and taught variations of it in 2013, 2016, and 2018. Students spend nearly a month exploring Anzaldúa’s works, but only after reading three centuries of U.S.-American philosophers who wrote in deeply personal and literary (...)
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  15. Gloria Anzaldúa’s Mexican Genealogy: From Pelados and Pachucos to New Mestizas.Alexander Stehn & Mariana Alessandri - 2020 - Genealogy 4 (1).
    This essay examines Gloria Anzaldúa’s critical appropriation of two Mexican philosophers in the writing of Borderlands/La Frontera: Samuel Ramos and Octavio Paz. We argue that although neither of these authors is cited in her seminal work, Anzaldúa had them both in mind through the writing process and that their ideas are present in the text itself. Through a genealogical reading of Borderlands/La Frontera, and aided by archival research, we demonstrate how Anzaldúa’s philosophical vision of the “new mestiza” is a critical (...)
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  16. La Mexicana En la Chicana: The Mexican Sources of Gloria Anzalduá's Inter-American Philosophy.Alexander Stehn & Mariana Alessandri - 2020 - Inter-American Journal of Philosophy 1 (11):44-62.
    This article examines Gloria Anzaldúa’s critical appropriation of Mexican philosophical sources, especially in the writing of Borderlands/La Frontera. We argue that Anzaldúa effectively contributed to la filosofía de lo mexicano by developing an Inter-American Philosophy of Mexicanness. More specifically, we recover “La Mexicana en la Chicana” by paying careful attention to Anzaldúa’s Mexican sources, both those she explicitly cites and those we have discovered while conducting archival research using the Gloria Evangelina Anzaldúa Papers at the Benson Latin American Collection at (...)
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  17. Intersectionality and Epistemic Erasure: A Caution to Decolonial Feminism.K. Bailey Thomas - 2020 - Hypatia 35 (3):509-523.
    In this article I caution that María Lugones's critiques of Kimberlé Crenshaw's intersectional theory posit a dangerous form of epistemic erasure, which underlies Lugones's decolonial methodology. This essay serves as a critical engagement with Lugones's essay “Radical Multiculturalism and Women of Color Feminisms” in order to uncover the decolonial lens within Crenshaw's theory of intersectionality. In her assertion that intersectionality is a “white bourgeois feminism colluding with the oppression of Women of Color,” Lugones precludes any possibility of intersectionality operating as (...)
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  18. Anger, Fragility, and the Formation of Resistant Feminist Space.Tiffany Tsantsoulas - 2020 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 34 (3):367-377.
    This article explores the role of second-order anger in the formation of resistant feminist space through the work of María Lugones and Sara Ahmed. I argue that this incommunicative form of anger can operate as a bridge between two senses of resistant spatiality in Lugones, connecting the hangout, which is a collective and transgressive space for alternative sense making, and the cocoon, which is a solitary and germinative space of tense internal transformation. By weaving connections with Ahmed’s concept of feminist (...)
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  19. Toward Decolonial Feminisms: Tracing the Lineages of Decolonial Thinking Through Latin American/Latinx Feminist Philosophy.Emma D. Velez & Nancy Tuana - 2020 - Hypatia 35 (3):366-372.
  20. Beyond the "Logic of Purity": "Post-Post-Intersectional" Glimpses in Decolonial Feminism.Anna Carastathis - 2019 - In Pedro DiPietro, Jennifer McWeeny & Shireen Roshanravan (eds.), Speaking Face to Face/Hablando Cara a Cara: The Visionary Philosophy of María Lugones. New York, NY, USA:
    This chapter examines María Lugones’s germane and insightful attempt to theorize “intermeshed oppressions,” which, she argues, have been (mis)represented in women of color feminisms by the concepts of “interlocking systems of oppression” and, more recently, “intersectionality.” The latter, intersectionality, introduced by Black feminist legal scholar Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw as a metaphor (1989) and as a “provisional concept” (1991), has become the predominant way of referencing the mutual constitution of what have been theorized as multiple systems of oppression, constructing the multiplicity (...)
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  21. Spectral Perception and Ghostly Subjectivity at the Colonial Gender/Race/Sex Nexus.Mariana Ortega - 2019 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 77 (4):401-409.
  22. The Incandescence of Photography.Mariana Ortega - 2019 - philoSOPHIA: A Journal of Continental Feminism 9 (2):68-87.
    Inspired by the Kristevan notion of abjection and her view of the corpse as the “most sickening of wastes,” I propose a notion of photographic incandescence—the affective and carnal possibility of a photograph to undo the self. I first discuss the notion of abjection and its relation to incandescence and explore how this incandescence is connected to Kristeva’s view of the corpse. Second, I discuss the notion of photographic incandescence in light of an analysis of Susan Meiselas’s photograph, Cuesta del (...)
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  23. The Incandescence of Photography: On Abjection, Fulguration, and the Corpse.Mariana Ortega - 2019 - philoSOPHIA: A Journal of Continental Feminism 9 (2):68-87.
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  24. Bodies of Color, Bodies of Sorrow: On Resistant Sorrow, Aesthetic Unsettlement, and Becoming-With.Mariana Ortega - 2019 - Critical Philosophy of Race 7 (1):124.
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  25. The Secret Life of Violence.Elena Ruíz - 2019 - In Dustin J. Byrd & Seyed Javad Miri (eds.), Frantz Fanon and Emancipatory Social Theory. Brill.
    This chapter proceeds in two ways. First, I argue that Fanon’s structural witnessing of racism yields important insights about the nature of violence that challenges the settler colonial concept of violence as the extra-legal use of force. Second, I argue that his analysis of violence is insufficient for combating colonial racism and violence because, using the terms of his own analysis, it leaves intact logics and mechanisms that allow racism to structurally renew itself in perpetuity: violence against women. Without a (...)
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  26. Mestiza Consciousness.Elena Ruíz - 2019 - In Gail Weiss, Ann V. Murphy & Gayle Salamon (eds.), Fifty Concepts for a Critical Phenomenology. Northwestern University Press.
  27. Spiritual Activism and Praxis: Gloria Anzaldúa's Mature Spirituality.Christopher D. Tirres - 2019 - The Pluralist 14 (1):119.
    gloria evangelina anzaldúa has been hailed as one of most important cultural theorists of the past fifty years. Her work, especially her groundbreaking Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza, continues to animate many contemporary discourses, especially those concerned with cultural and linguistic hybridity, intersectionality, and women of color feminism. Yet one may ask: What is Anzaldúa's distinctive contribution to contemporary discourses of spirituality and religion? In a 1993 interview, Anzaldúa herself lays bare the relative inattention that critics have given to her (...)
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  28. Decolonial Feminism at the Intersection: A Critical Reflection on the Relationship Between Decolonial Feminism and Intersectionality.Emma D. Velez - 2019 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 33 (3):390-406.
    "[N]o matter how much of a coalition space this is, it ain't nothing like the coalescing you've got to do tomorrow, and Tuesday and Wednesday."This essay is a critical reflection on the centrality of coalitional politics for decolonial feminist philosophy. Decolonial feminisms emerge from multisited struggles with colonization and, as a result, are rich and heterogeneous.1 Thus, the starting point for decolonial feminists must be one that centers on coalitional politics. Women of color have long emphasized the importance of coalition (...)
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  29. Breaking Down Barriers: Applying Lugones’ Concept of ‘World Travelling’ to Reduce Stigma Associated with Schizophrenia.Andrew Molas - 2018 - In David G. Murray (ed.), Metaphysics 2015: Proceedings of the Sixth World Metaphysics Conference. Spain: pp. 725-740.
    My paper explores Maria Lugones’ concept of “world travelling” and how we can use it for the purposes of engaging with people who have schizophrenia in order to reduce stigma. I argue that travelling to a schizophrenic person’s “world” can help us gain a better understanding of her situation and experiences and, as a result, I argue that the interpersonal interaction which world travelling facilitates can reduce the stigmatization associated with this mental illness. I argue that the effects of stigma (...)
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  30. Writing to Be Heard: Recovering the Philosophy of Luisa Capetillo.Stephanie Rivera Berruz - 2018 - Essays in Philosophy 19 (1):17-34.
    Luisa Capetillo has been heralded as the first feminist writer of Puerto Rico. She authored four books and embodied her emancipatory philosophical commitments, but has received scant philosophical attention. In this paper I recover the philosophy of Capetillo as part of a Latin American and Caribbean philosophical tradition centered on radical praxis places sexuality at the centerfold of class politics. At the intersection between gender equity and class emancipation Capetillo advocated for the liberatory possibilities of education, which served as the (...)
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  31. The Hermeneutics of Mexican-American Political Philosophy.Elena Ruíz - 2018 - Inter-American Journal of Philosophy 9 (2):45-57.
    Este artículo aborda la prominencia de las actitudes colonialistas en tradiciones anti-coloniales, observando la capacidad del racismo sexista para adaptarse en la filosofía política Mexicano-Estadounidense. Señalo un paralelo entre el uso de universales culturales en el pensamiento hermenéutico y la continuación de mecanismos interpretativos colonialies en los debates centrales de la filosofía política Mexicano-Estadounidense. Basándome en pensamiento comparativo indígena de resistencia anticolonial, advierto contra tales tendencias excluyentes y mimetismas en un momento tan crítico de la formación de campo, mientras resaltando (...)
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  32. Resisting the Logic of Ambivalence: Bad Faith as Subversive, Anticolonial Practice.Kris Sealey - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (2):163-177.
    This article critiques Homi Bhabha's proposal that mimicry, as a transgressive performance of ambivalence, disrupts the colonial violence of the stereotype, and as such, generates emancipatory conditions for postcolonial subjects. I am critical of this naming of mimicry as enabling a possible liberation from colonial violence not only because it fails to address the loss of belonging that significantly marks the experience of being so violated, but also because it seems to intensify this loss in the hybridity and fragmentation that (...)
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  33. Latin American Decolonial Studies: Feminist Issues.Sandra Harding - 2017 - Feminist Studies 43 (3):624.
  34. World-Traveling, Double Consciousness, and Laughter.Chris Kramer - 2017 - Israeli Journal for Humor Research 2 (6):93-119.
    In this paper I borrow from Maria Lugones’ work on playful “world-traveling” and W.E.B. Du Bois’ notion of “double consciousness” to make the case that humor can facilitate an openness and cooperative attitude among an otherwise closed, even adversarial audience. I focus on what I call “subversive” humor, that which is employed by or on behalf of those who have been continually marginalized. When effectively used, such humor can foster the inclination and even desire to listen to others and, if (...)
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  35. Philosophical Letter Writing: A Look at Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz's "Reply" and Gloria Anzaldúa's "Speaking in Tongues".Margaret Newton - 2017 - The Pluralist 12 (1):101-109.
    scholars often use letter correspondences to uncover missing historical information. For example, while searching for the influential but unacknowledged women in the history of pragmatism, Charlene Haddock Seigfried discovered John Dewey’s letters to Elsie Ripley Clapp. Using these letters, Seigfried defended Clapp’s name as an early pragmatist. Similarly, Joan Smith cited Dewey’s letter to John T. McManis to show that Ella Flagg Young likewise influenced Dewey’s work. More recently, Eduardo Mendieta has defended a different approach to letters, and argues that (...)
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  36. In-Between: Latina Feminist Phenomenology, Multiplicity, and the Self. [REVIEW]Andrea J. Pitts - 2017 - philoSOPHIA: A Journal of Continental Feminism 7 (1):193-198.
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  37. Framing Intersectionality.Elena Ruíz - 2017 - In The Routledge Companion to the Philosophy of Race. pp. 335-348.
    Intersectionality is a term that arose within the black feminist intellectual tradition for the purposes of identifying interlocking systems of oppression. As a descriptive term, it refers to the ways human identity is shaped by multiple social vectors and overlapping identity categories (such as sex, race, class) that may not be readily visible in single-axis formulations of identity, but which are taken to be integral to robustly capture the multifaceted nature of human experience. As a diagnostic term, it captures the (...)
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  38. On the Politics of Coalition.Elena Ruíz & Kristie Dotson - 2017 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 3 (2):1-16.
    In the wake of continued structural asymmetries between women of color and white feminisms, this essay revisits intersectional tensions in Catharine MacKinnon’s Toward a Feminist Theory of the State while exploring productive spaces of coalition. To explore such spaces, we reframe Toward a Feminist Theory of the State in terms of its epistemological project and highlight possible synchronicities with liberational features in women-of-color feminisms. This is done, in part, through an analysis of the philosophical role “method” plays in MacKinnon’s argument, (...)
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  39. Loving From Below: Of (De)Colonial Love and Other Demons.Carolyn Ureña - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (1):86-102.
    This article explores the implications of adopting decolonial love as a theoretical and practical model for healing the wounds of coloniality by contrasting its revolutionary potential to the damaging effects of its opposite, colonial love. The latter, based in an imperialist, dualist logic, dangerously fetishizes the beloved object and participates in the oppression and subjugation of difference. Decolonial feminist theorist Chela Sandoval's concept of decolonial love, by contrast, originates “from below” and operates between those rendered other by hegemonic forces. In (...)
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  40. Racial Interpellation, Civic Education and Anti-Latina/o Racism.Pitts Andrea - 2016 - In Ramón Grosfoguel, Roberto D. Hernández & Ernesto Rosen Velasquez (eds.), Decolonizing the Westernized University: Interventions in Philosophy of Education from Within and Without. Lanham: Lexington Books.
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  41. At the Crossroads: Latina Identity and Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex.Stephanie Rivera Berruz - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (2):319-333.
    Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex has been heralded as a canonical text of feminist theory. The book focuses on providing an account of the lived experience of woman that generates a condition of otherness. However, I contend that it falls short of being able to account for the multidimensionality of identity insofar as Beauvoir's argument rests upon the comparison between racial and gendered oppression that is understood through the black–white binary. The result of this framework is the imperceptibility of (...)
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  42. Reading Cristina García's The Agüero Sisters as Latina Feminist Philosophy.Susan C. Méndez - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (2):388-403.
    Through an analysis of the interconnections or lack thereof between gender and epistemology, I present Cristina García's The Agüero Sisters as a text of Latina feminist philosophy. First, I use the works of Linda Alcoff and Walter Mignolo to illustrate the political nature of epistemology and how women and people of color in particular are disenfranchised from such a political endeavor. Then I examine the connections among the concepts of origin, absence, inheritance, and knowledge-construction in García's novel to further a (...)
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  43. Speaking in Resistant Tongues: Latina Feminism, Embodied Knowledge, and Transformation.Mariana Ortega - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (2):313-318.
    This essay is an introduction to the cluster on Latina feminism published in Hypatia (Spring 2016), Vo. 31 (2), which features essays on various areas of Latina feminisms as well as discussions on the intersection of Latina feminisms and the work of thinkers such as Mikhail Bakhtin, Simone de Beauvoir, Enrique Dussell, Immanuel Kant, Édouard Glissant, Walter Mignolo, and Friedrich Nietzsche. Contributors to the cluster include Stephanie Rivera Berruz, Cynthia M. Paccacerqua, Andrea J. Pitts, Monique Roelofs, Susan C. Méndez, Gabriela (...)
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  44. In-Between: Latina Feminist Phenomenologhy, Multiplicity and the Self.Mariana Ortega - 2016 - SUNY.
    This original study intertwining Latina feminism, existential phenomenology, and race theory offers a new philosophical approach to understanding selfhood and identity. Focusing on writings by Gloría Anzaldúa, María Lugones, and Linda Martín Alcoff, Mariana Ortega articulates a phenomenology that introduces a conception of selfhood as both multiple and singular. Her Latina feminist phenomenological approach can account for identities belonging simultaneously to different worlds, including immigrants, exiles, and inhabitants of borderlands. Ortega’s project forges new directions not only in Latina feminist thinking (...)
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  45. In the Flesh and Word.Cynthia M. Paccacerqua - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (2):437-446.
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  46. Gloria Anzaldúa's Affective Logic of Volverse Una.Cynthia M. Paccacerqua - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (2):334-351.
    Although Gloria Anzaldúa's critical categories have steadily entered discussions in the field of philosophy, a lingering skepticism remains about her works’ ability to transcend the particularity of her lived experience. In an effort to respond to this attitude, I make Anzaldúa's corpus the center of philosophical analysis and posit that immanent to this work is a logic that lends it the unity of a critical philosophy that accounts for its concrete, multilayered character and shifting, creative force. I call this an (...)
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  47. Gloria E. Anzaldúa's Autohistoria‐Teoría as an Epistemology of Self‐Knowledge/Ignorance.Andrea J. Pitts - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (2):352-369.
    In this article, I examine the relationship between self-knowledge practices among women of color and structural patterns of ignorance by offering an analysis of Gloria E. Anzaldúa's discussions of self-writing. I propose that by writing about her own experiences in a manner that hails others to critically interrogate their own identities, Anzaldúa develops important theoretical resources for understanding self-knowledge, self-ignorance, and practices of knowing others. In particular, I claim that in her later writings, Anzaldúa offers a rich epistemological account of (...)
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  48. Navigating Frames of Address: María Lugones on Language, Bodies, Things, and Places.Monique Roelofs - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (2):370-387.
    Address figures prominently in contemporary feminism, yet calls for further theorizing. Modes of address are forms of signification we direct at people, objects, and places, and they at us. Address constitutes a vital dimension of our corporeal interactions with persons and the material world. Our relationships are in motion as we adopt modes of address toward one another or fail to do so. Clarifying address through examples from Gloria Anzaldúa, this essay reveals its importance in María Lugones's writings. The essay (...)
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  49. Linguistic Alterity and the Multiplicitous Self: Critical Phenomenologies in Latina Feminist Thought.Elena Flores Ruíz - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (2):421-436.
    Latina feminists like Gloria Anzaldúa and Mariana Ortega have developed anti-essentialist accounts of selfhood that are responsive to the problem of alterity and hermeneutic alienation experienced by multiplicitous subjects, understood as those who must navigate between multiple cultural norms and often conflicting interpretive traditions. These accounts can be fortified by examining the sense of inarticulacy that arises from having to name conditions of existence undergirded by social and historical contradictions and ambiguities—especially under the experiential stress of gendered social violence, cultural (...)
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  50. Loving From Below: Of Colonial Love and Other Demons.Carolyn Ureña - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (4):86-102.
    This article explores the implications of adopting decolonial love as a theoretical and practical model for healing the wounds of coloniality by contrasting its revolutionary potential to the damaging effects of its opposite, colonial love. The latter, based in an imperialist, dualist logic, dangerously fetishizes the beloved object and participates in the oppression and subjugation of difference. Decolonial feminist theorist Chela Sandoval's concept of decolonial love, by contrast, originates “from below” and operates between those rendered other by hegemonic forces. In (...)
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