About this topic
Summary This category covers discussions of various relevant topics associated with Latinas in the U.S.  Some of these topics include the importance of lived experience in theorizing selfhood and identity, intersectional analyses of the condition of U.S Latinas (analyses that take into consideration the intersection between race, class, gender, sexuality, nationality, religion  and other axes of oppression),  cross-cultural communication, relationship between women of color feminisms and white feminisms as well as development of theories of resistance to oppression and  of coalitions across differences.  The category includes philosophical writings as well as interdisciplinary writings that make use of a plurality of methodologies.
Key works Latina feminism owes a great deal to the work of Chicana theorist Gloria Anzaldúa, specifically her 1987 groundbreaking work Borderlands/La Frontera, The New Mestiza (Anzaldúa 1987). Key works by Latina feminist philosophers  include Lugones 2003, Alcoff 2006 and Schutte 1998. For a cluster on Latina feminism from a philosophical perspective see Ortega 2016. For a general introduction to Latina feminisms see Ortega 2015. For an anthology that includes work on both U.S Latina Feminisms and Latin American Feminisms see Pitts et al 2020.
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  1. Comparative race, comparative racisms (2007).Linda Martin Alcoff - manuscript
  2. Anzaldúa’s Snake-Bridge as Alternative to Mestizaje.Joshua M. Hall - forthcoming - The Journal of Aesthetic Education.
    In this article, I offer the figure of the snake-bridge as (a) the coiled central metaphor in Gloria Anzaldúa’s masterpiece, Borderlands/La Frontera, (b) the interpretive bridge connecting the early (This Bridge Called My Back) middle (Borderlands) and late (Light in the Dark) periods of her oeuvre, and (c) an alternate unifying metaphor to mestizaje. My first section offers a close reading of Borderlands, locating snake-bridge in the east-west snake of the Rio Grande that queer Chicana borderlanders cross north and south (...)
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  3. Radical multiculturalism and women of color feminisms.María Lugones - forthcoming - Revista Internacional de Filosofía Política.
  4. Between Hermeneutic Violence and Alphabets of Survival.Elena Ruíz - forthcoming - In Andrea Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press.
    This essay addresses structural violence against Latinas by looking at the existential toll different forms of cultural violence take on us. In particular, it looks at linguistic violence and the role lesser-known violences play in the intergenerational continuation of colonial violence, such as hermeneutic violence. Defined as violence done to systems of meaning and interpretation, hermeneutic violence is discussed at length in relation to the experience of harm and injury. The essay further explores some resistant epistemic practices Latina feminists have (...)
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  5. María Lugones, Sylvia Wynter, and Intersex Liberation.Alex Adamson - 2023 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 37 (3):345-355.
    ABSTRACT Reading the work of Sylvia Wynter and María Lugones together, particularly as it pertains to sex, gender, and sexuality, reveals the limits of popular discourses and frameworks of queer and feminist philosophy that may unwittingly obscure its constructions of sex and gender along the global color line. This article looks at Wynter’s analysis of gender as a category differentially applied across the global color line and Lugones’s analysis of the coloniality of gender. The author concludes to move beyond the (...)
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  6. Night Vision: Seeing Ourselves Through Dark Moods.Mariana Alessandri - 2023 - Princeton: Princeton University Press.
    Under the light of ancient Western philosophies, our darker moods like grief, anguish, and depression can seem irrational. When viewed through the lens of modern psychology, they can even look like mental disorders. The self-help industry, determined to sell us the promise of a brighter future, can sometimes leave us feeling ashamed that we are not more grateful, happy, or optimistic. Night Vision invites us to consider a different approach to life, one in which we stop feeling bad about feeling (...)
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  7. Decolonial Movidas: María Lugones’s Notion of Decolonial Aesthesis through Cosmologies.Denise Meda Calderon - 2023 - The Pluralist 18 (1):22-31.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Decolonial Movidas: María Lugones’s Notion of Decolonial Aesthesis through CosmologiesDenise Meda CalderonIntroductionMaría Lugones advances a decolonial feminist methodology that allows one to see both dehumanizing social reductions of colonized peoples and the resistant relations operating within non-dominant socialities. By exploring this double “seeing,” I articulate the relationship between resistant socialities and Lugones’s notion of decolonial aesthesis. In her only published text on decolonial aesthesis, Lugones states: “Thinking about aesthesis, (...)
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  8. Oppressione, resistenza ed emancipazione in María Lugones.Brunella Casalini - 2023 - Scienza and Politica. Per Una Storia Delle Dottrine 34 (67):75-90.
    La teoria dell’oppressione di Lugones è incentrata sulla necessità per l’oppresso di coltivare una diversa logica della realtà. Le condizioni per l’emergere di una coscienza resistente poggiano su un’ontologia pluralista e sull’idea di un sé molteplice capace di viaggiare tra «mondi». Un ruolo fondamentale viene occupato dallo spazio del _limen_. Il limen costituisce un portale verso la liberazione, ma non ne garantisce l’esito. Il progetto politico di emancipazione dalle oppressioni multiple richiede la creazione di coalizioni. Un obiettivo che può essere (...)
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  9. Linguistic Rupture, Racialization, and Resistance in Latina/Latinx Feminisms: A Critical Phenomenological Approach.Erika Grimm - 2023 - Dissertation, The Pennsylvania State University
    This dissertation offers an account of linguistic practices of Latinx people in the United States through the lens of critical feminist phenomenology. It examines how Latinx people are racialized on the basis of their language use, the normative logics that structure those processes of racialization, and the practices by which Latinx people resist and transform those logics. In this project, I develop a critical feminist phenomenological approach that locates itself within a tradition of Latina feminist phenomenology—a tradition that has prioritized (...)
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  10. "Creative Acts of Vision": Connecting Art and Theory through Gloria Anzaldúa's Archived Sketches.Sara Ishii - 2023 - The Journal of Aesthetic Education 57 (2):94-111.
    Abstract:Queer Chicana author Gloria Anzaldúa often used visual art to develop and teach her theories, which address issues relating to social identity and institutions as well as creativity and spirituality. Her large collection of archived sketches at the Gloria Evangelina Anzaldúa Papers at the University of Texas demonstrates her drive to visually express ideas. The archive also holds unpublished works and talks in which Anzaldúa discusses her concepts of creativity and the image-making process. Despite the prevalence of images in her (...)
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  11. El derecho a descansar desde el feminismo poscolonial de Gloria Anzaldúa.Martha Palacio-Avendaño - 2023 - Res Pública. Revista de Historia de Las Ideas Políticas 26 (1):57-66.
    El derecho a descansar es una reivindicación de justicia de primer orden. Es una demanda dirigida al núcleo de la organización social de nuestras necesidades. La caracterización de este derecho se presenta, la mayor de las veces, a partir de los conceptos de trabajo productivo -remunerado- y de cuidado -en gran parte no remunerado. La defensa del ocio y también de la pereza es convocada tanto por los trabajos creativos como por los industriosos. Pero, qué pasa cuando el derecho a (...)
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  12. Epistemological knots for a history of the resistances of Southern feminisms.Mariana Guerra Pérez & Mariana Alvarado - 2023 - Resistances. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (7):e230105.
    Este texto se sitúa en la juntura de los feminismos del sur que señalaron el encubrimiento de la heterogeneidad de las mujeres indo-afro-latino-americanas. Desde las cadencias y los ritmos de las voces de mujeres de Nuestra América cuyos saberes interrumpen, disrumpen e intervienen muestra que los problemas del feminismo blanco burgués del norte no son los de todas las mujeres puesto que algunas mujeres escapan a la fragilidad femenina que justifica el paternalismo y los micromachismos dentro y fuera de la (...)
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  13. Beyond the Coloniality of Gender.Alex Adamson - 2022 - Philosophy and Global Affairs 2 (2):299-329.
    This article explores Sylvia Wynter’s analysis of gender as a category differentially applied across the global color line and María Lugones’ account of the coloniality of gender. While Wynter’s and Lugones’s work offer consequential insights for queer, trans, and intersex studies and activism, they have deliberately engaged these particular discourses and histories of struggle in limited ways. Wynter analyzes the contradictions of Western feminists’ organizing against female genital cutting in Africa, but she does not link her conclusions to their ramifications (...)
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  14. “What Would it Take You to See Me Unbroken”? Insights from María Lugones on Cultivating Loving Perception in Teaching.Cristina Cammarano - 2022 - Philosophy of Education 78 (1):1-13.
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  15. Pensamento pós-colonial, gênero e poder em María Lugones: multiplicidade ontológica e multiculturalismo.Guilherme Paiva de Carvalho - 2022 - Trans/Form/Ação 45 (spe):311-338.
    Resumo: O artigo objetiva refletir sobre as concepções de gênero, poder, multiplicidade e multiculturalismo, em María Lugones, analisando o modo como sua teoria se associa ao pensamento pós-colonial. Para tanto, aborda a perspectiva do pensamento pós-colonial e a noção de colonialidade do poder, considerando o sistema moderno/colonial de gênero. As teorias pós-coloniais criticam o paradigma epistemológico do Ocidente e a hierarquização baseada na distinção entre humanos e não humanos, colonizador e colonizado. Em sua análise do sistema moderno/colonial, María Lugones introduz (...)
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  16. Two hearts and a champurria tongue: The poetic creation of Adriana Pinda as communicative morphogenesis of the mapuche kimün.Noelia Figueroa Burdiles & Demsi Figueroa Verdugo - 2022 - Alpha (Osorno) 55:114-131.
    Resumen: La poeta mapuche-williche se autodenomina “champurria” como forma de alejarse de la pureza lingüística y cultural en que se desenvuelven la lengua hegemónica y el mapudungun formal. Este posicionamiento, más el reconocimiento de que la poeta es portadora del mapuche kimün porque también es machi, sugieren la posibilidad de comprender sus textos como una morfogénesis comunicativa, atendiendo a las nociones de mestizaje que nos ofrecen Gloria Anzaldúa, María Lugones y Silvia Rivera Cusicanqui. La lectura de la poeta-machi nos interpela (...)
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  17. Philosophy in Public Life in the Latin American and Latinx traditions: Mexico and Argentina.Sergio A. Gallegos-Ordorica - 2022 - In Lee C. McIntyre, Nancy Arden McHugh & Ian Olasov (eds.), A companion to public philosophy. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 75-85.
    Latin American and Latinx philosophers have a long and rich history of deep engagement in public life through a variety of different projects and venues. This chapter offers a brief survey of the historical development and practice of philosophy in public life in Latin American and Latinx traditions. Because of their unique histories, it engages public philosophy in Mexico and Argentina separately. The chapter shows that a guiding thread in Argentinian public philosophy is a deep‐rooted concern about the threats created (...)
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  18. An Intimate Trespass of Peregrina Chorines: Dancing with María Lugones and Saidiya Hartman.Joshua M. Hall - 2022 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 28 (2):96-122.
    A recent (2020) special issue in Critical Philosophy of Race dedicated to Maria Lugones illustrates and thematizes the continuing challenge of (re)constructing coalitions among Latina and Black feminists and their allies. As one proposed solution to this challenge, in their guest editors’ introduction to that special issue, Emma Velez and Nancy Tuana suggest an interpretive “dancing with” Lugones. Drawing on my own “dancing-with” interpretive method (which significantly predates that special issue), in the present article I choreograph an interpretive duet between (...)
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  19. Ill Will: Or, Mental Illness and Resistant Subjectivity in Ahmed and Lugones.Katie Howard & Cash Kelly - 2022 - Journal of World Philosophies 7 (1):13-28.
    pSara Ahmed’s emWillful Subjects/em develops an account of willfulness as a site of simultaneous oppression and resistance: a diagnosis attributed to particular (not-quite-)subjects and to modes of behavior that are thereby diminished, pathologized, and controlled, and a “diagnosis” that may be positively affirmed as a way of living and doing otherwise. This essay puts Ahmed’s work on willfulness in conversation with María Lugones’ decolonial feminism, particularly her theory of active subjectivity. With Lugones, we offer, one can better understand the resistant (...)
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  20. For a Genealogy of Decolonial Feminism: Living Archives of a Movement.Agustin Lao-Montes - 2022 - Hypatia 37 (3):582-600.
    The three volumes I am considering in this review essay constitute a living archive of the political and epistemic movement called decolonial feminism. Together, Tejiendo de Otro Modo: Feminismo, Epistemología, y Apuestas Descoloniales en el Abya Yala, Feminismo Descolonial: Nuevos aportes metodológicos a mas de una década, and Decolonial Feminism in Abya Yala, collect the principal contributions to the profoundly important production of critical theory and radical politics. The editors and contributors include a diversity of key figures in decolonial feminism, (...)
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  21. pluralidad necesaria: Butler, Anzaldúa y el pensamiento postnietzscheano.Sigifredo Esquivel Marin & Leobardo Villegas Mariscal - 2022 - Revista Internacional de Filosofía Teórica y Práctica 2 (1):111-142.
    El presente trabajo elucida el axioma de “la pluralidad necesaria” a partir de algunas calas y notas del pensamiento de Judith Butler y algunos cruces procedentes de la filosofía de Michel Foucault y Friedrich Nietzsche, así como el influjo postnietzscheano contemporáneo, en contraste con el pensamiento mestizo subalterno latinoamericano de Gloria Anzaldúa. La hipótesis central es explicada en estos términos: no existe ningún fundamento metafísico que sustente al mundo; todo es una construcción cultural, resultado del poder predominante en un determinado (...)
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  22. Decolonial Feminism in Abya Yala: Caribbean, Meso, and South American Contributions and Challenges.Yuderkys Espinosa Miñoso, Maria Lugones & Nelson Maldonado-Torres (eds.) - 2022 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This book provides an introduction to the key arguments in decolonial feminism, particularly, the coloniality of gender, the critique of white and Eurocentric feminisms, the imbrication between gender, race, and colonialism, feminicides, and the coloniality of democracy and public institutions.
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  23. Critical Impurity and the Race for Critical Phenomenology.Mariana Ortega - 2022 - Puncta 5 (4):9-31.
    Informed by María Lugones’s understanding of the “logic of purity,” this essay analyzes the race for critical phenomenology. It suggests how Lugones’s analysis of such a logic may guide us in developing phenomenological analyses of complex social identities such as race. It also shows how traces of the logic of purity remain even in critical phenomenological analyses of race. Specifically, the essay analyzes the methodological call for a reduction of quasi-transcendental structures. Ultimately an attitude and practice of critical criticality and (...)
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  24. Radicalising ‘Learning From Other Resisters’ in Decolonial Feminism.Intan Paramaditha - 2022 - Feminist Review 131 (1):33-49.
    The rhetoric of decolonising feminism has been increasingly connected to reformism rather than a radical intervention. Problematising the idea of finality in the calls to decolonise, I suggest that decolonial feminism should be understood as an experiment, a risky, unfinished project rather than a fixed location, and I argue that it should be based on a more radicalised notion of what María Lugones calls ‘learning from other resisters’. I draw on my experience working with feminists across the vast and diverse (...)
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  25. Women of Color Structural Feminisms.Elena Ruíz - 2022 - In Shirley-Anne Tate (ed.), The Palgrave Handbook on Critical Race And Gender.
    One way to track the many critical impacts of women of color feminisms is through the powerful structural analyses of gendered and racialized oppression they offer. This article discusses diverse lineages of women of color feminisms in the global South that tackle systemic structures of power and domination from their situated perspectives. It offers an introduction to structuralist theories in the humanities and differentiates them from women of color feminist theorizing, which begins analyses of structures from embodied and phenomenological st¬¬andpoints--with (...)
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  26. El Mundo Zurdo 8: Selected Works from the 2019 Meeting of the Society for the Study of Gloria Anzaldúa.Adrianna M. Santos, Rita E. Urquijo-Ruiz & Norma E. Cantú (eds.) - 2022
    "This volume gathers selected academic and creative works from the 2019 meeting of the Society and recognizes the importance and sustained impact of Anzaldúa's work. The productions for these edited conference proceedings have been organized into distinct categories that align with the conference tracks in El Mundo Zurdo: each work speaks to the one next to it, emphasizing the manner in which Anzaldúan thought travels across communities-from the personal to the political, from the academic to the activist, from the creative (...)
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  27. La Mexicana en la Chicana: Sources of Anzaldúa’s Mexican Philosophy.Alexander V. Stehn & Mariana Alessandri - 2022 - In Adrianna M. Santos, Rita E. Urquijo-Ruiz & Norma E. Cantú (eds.), El Mundo Zurdo 8: Selected Works from the 2019 Meeting of the Society for the Study of Gloria Anzaldúa. pp. 169-186.
    Our paper examines Gloria Anzaldúa’s critical appropriation of Mexican philosophical sources, especially in the writing of Borderlands/La Frontera. We demonstrate how Anzaldúa developed a transnational Philosophy of Mexicanness, effectively contributing to what has been recently characterized as the “multi-generational project to pursue philosophy from and about Mexican circumstances” (Vargas). More specifically, we recover “La Mexicana en la Chicana” by paying careful attention to Anzaldúa’s Mexican sources, both those she explicitly cites and those we have discovered while conducting archival research using (...)
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  28. Feminisms of the Spanish-speaking Caribbean1.Stephanie Rivera Berruz - 2021 - Philosophy Compass 16 (10):e12766.
    This essay explores the philosophical productions of women from the Spanish speaking Caribbean. Here the Caribbean is understood as a multiplicitous and polyphonic space that exists amidst modernities engendered by colonization. I present the intellectual contributions of Luisa Capetillo, Ofelia Rodríguez Acosta, Petronila Angélica Gómez, Ochy Curiel, Yuderkys Espinosa Miñoso, and Yomaira Figueroa as fertile philosophical starting points from which to frame a feminist tradition of the Spanish‐speaking Caribbean that appreciates the multiple and often conflicting body of ideas that emerge (...)
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  29. The Ability System and Decolonial Resistance: The Case of the Victorian Invalid.Rachel Cicoria - 2021 - Journal of World Philosophies 6 (2):45-60.
    Determinations of ability/disability are rooted in coloniality, specifically in categorizations of race, gender, and animality as they bear on social formations. I elucidate this rootedness by weaving the “coloniality of ability” into María Lugones’ accounts of the coloniality of gender and the colonial-modern system as founded on the “human-nonhuman” difference. This enables me to reveal an “ability system” based on the “ability-bestiality” difference and delineate with more specificity liminal sites of oppression and resistance across the heterogeneous socialities of coloniality-modernity. From (...)
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  30. Retro-Sex, Anti-Trans Legislation, and the Colonial/Modern Gender System.Marie Draz - 2021 - philoSOPHIA A Journal of transContinental Feminism 11 (1-2):26-48.
    This essay uses Maria Lugones’s account of the colonial/modern gender system to analyze the retro-use of “biological sex” in recent anti-trans legislation. The retro-use of sex refers to the role of sex in legislation that has been widely described by critics as moving the U.S. backward in time, or as a rollback of trans rights. The essay argues that Lugones’s theorization of the sex/gender distinction in the context of colonialism offers a better way of understanding the retro-use of sex in (...)
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  31. Would You Think What You Would Not Live?Michael Roy Hames-García - 2021 - Journal of World Philosophies 6 (2):230-241.
    María Lugones was a feminist philosopher whose work spanned four decades, two continents, and multiple languages. Over the course of her career, her writing made major contributions to feminist ethics, the philosophy of race, lesbian epistemology, and decolonial thought. She passed away on July 14, 2020, after many years of poor health, leaving behind an influential legacy and a substantial body of unpublished work.
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  32. On Decolonizing Social Ontology and the Feminist Canon for Transnational Feminisms.Pedro Monque - 2021 - Metaphilosophy 52 (1):127-141.
    Serene J. Khader’s Decolonizing Universalism presents a vision for how feminism might be decolonized for transnational work by doing without traditional Western feminist values and focusing instead on opposing sexist oppression. This paper presents a challenge to the idea that feminism consists in opposing sexist oppression, claiming that it instead consists in opposing gender oppression, where that includes combating cissexism and heterosexism. More specifically, it argues that critiquing cissexist criteria within gender categories as well as critiquing harms that follow from (...)
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  33. In-Between-Worlds and Re-membering.Mariana Ortega - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (2):449-458.
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  34. To Decolonise is to Beautify: A Perspective from Two Transgender Latina Makeup Artists in the US.Karla M. Padrón - 2021 - Feminist Review 128 (1):156-162.
  35. The Polymorphism of Necro-Being.Andrea J. Pitts - 2021 - Journal of Philosophy of Disability 1:117-143.
    In this paper, I examine the writings of African American philosopher Leonard Harris as an author who has been read primarily for his contributions to the study of Africana philosophy, U.S. pragmatism, and moral philosophy. Despite contributions to bioethics and reflections on systemic racism within the context of institutional medical settings, Harris’s work has yet to be read in terms of its relevance for disability critique. This paper demonstrates how Harris’s writings may be read as contributing to the field of (...)
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  36. Andean aesthetics and anticolonial resistance: a cosmology of unsociable bodies.Omar Rivera - 2021 - New York: Bloomsbury Academic.
    Informed by Gloria Anzaldúa's and José Carlos Mariátegui's work, as well as by Andean cosmology, Omar Rivera turns to Inka stonework and architecture as an example of a "Cosmological Aesthetics." He articulates ways of sensing, feeling and remembering that are attuned to an aesthetic of water, earth and light. On this basis, Rivera brings forth a corporeal orientation that can be inhabited by the oppressed, one that withdraws from predominant modern/Western conceptions of the human. By providing an aesthetic analysis of (...)
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  37. A/parecernos: Rethinking the Multiplicitous Self as “Haunted” with Anzaldúa, La Malinche, and Other Ghosts.Rebekah Sinclair & Margaret Newton - 2021 - The Pluralist 16 (1):49-57.
    Unlike many theories of the self found in Western philosophy, Maria Lugones and Mariana Ortega argue that subjectivity is multiplicitous in ways that defy the either/or logic of colonial Western thought. They also center liminal subjects, take embodiment seriously, and position multiplicitous subjects as always already in the borderlands. Their accounts of multiplicity are grounded in their lived experiences. Nevertheless, Lugones and Ortega disagree on the ontological and existential statuses of the multiplicitous self. While Lugones defends ontological pluralism and the (...)
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  38. Oxford Handbook of Feminist Philosophy.Ásta Sveinsdóttir & Kim Q. Hall (eds.) - 2021
    This exciting new Handbook offers a comprehensive overview of the contemporary state of the field in feminist philosophy. The editors' introduction and forty-five essays cover feminist critical engagements with philosophy and adjacent scholarly fields, as well as feminist approaches to current debates and crises across the world. Authors cover topics ranging from the ways in which feminist philosophy attends to other systems of oppression, and the gendered, racialized, and classed assumptions embedded in philosophical concepts, to feminist perspectives on prominent subfields (...)
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  39. Secular Decolonial Woes.Rafael Vizcaíno - 2021 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 35 (1):71-92.
    This essay builds on a recent intervention made by Mariana Ortega, who has called on philosophers committed to decolonization to avoid reproducing “colonial impulses and erasures” in the very attempt to advance epistemic decolonization. When connected to “practices of un-knowing,” these tendencies become an “affliction,” which Ortega labels with the notion of “decolonial woes.” The author focuses on the reception of the spiritual elements in Anzaldúa’s work to identify a specifically secular form of a decolonial woe: the disregard for the (...)
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  40. Decolonizing Feminist Theory: Latina Contributions to the Debate.Linda Martín Alcoff - 2020 - In Andrea Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 11-28.
    This chapter suggests an approach to decolonial feminism drawing from Latina feminist theory and practice. Rejecting an imperial feminism involves something else besides “going local”: it requires a genuine reorientation of feminist theory toward the everyday. This chapter considers how this affects the central debates about gender identities and gender liberation. How might we approach gender questions in the context of learning from, rather than teaching, lo cotidiano of the impoverished? This would counter the popular accounts of identity formation that (...)
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  41. Lugones's World-Making.Linda Martín Alcoff - 2020 - Critical Philosophy of Race 8 (1-2):199-211.
    This article reflects on the worlds that María Lugones has made and has transformed, particularly for the doing of feminist theory. Thus this article will be more exploratory than argumentative: to explore the lessons that Lugones's work holds, especially her work on pluralist feminism, world-traveling, the uses of anger, boomerang perception, and the multiplicitousness of both our selves and our communities, for our twenty-first-century challenges. This article argues that Lugones's work addresses how to negotiate conflicts that arise within social movements (...)
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  42. Gloria Anzaldúa as philosopher: The early years (1962–1987).Mariana Alessandri - 2020 - Philosophy Compass 15 (7):e12687.
    It's time that philosophers read Gloria Anzaldúa as a philosopher. Scholars have been hinting at it for some time, but in describing her they still tend to choose the terms “theorist,” “feminist,” and “thinker” instead of “philosopher.” Anzaldúa fits into all of these categories, but from her notes, we know that Anzaldúa also thought of herself as a philosopher. In 2002, for instance, she called herself a “feminist‐visionary‐spiritual‐activist‐poet‐philosopher fiction writer.” This essay argues that we should grant Anzaldúa's wish to be (...)
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  43. Interlocking, Intersecting, and Intermeshing: Critical Engagements with Black and Latina Feminist Paradigms of Identity and Oppression.Kathryn Sophia Belle - 2020 - Critical Philosophy of Race 8 (1-2):165-198.
    Inspired by Mariana Ortega's invitation to reflect on diverse iterations of intersectionality, this article focuses on María Lugones's engagements with two Black feminist concepts, namely, interlocking oppressions and intersectionality. It explores these concepts alongside Lugones's use of her own terms such as intermeshed, curdling, multiplicity, and fusion, in several paradigm shifting essays, specifically, “Purity, Impurity, and Separation”, “Tactical Strategies of the Street Walker”, “On Complex Communication”, “Heterosexism and the Colonial/Modern Gender System”, “Toward a Decolonial Feminism”, “Methodological Notes Toward a Decolonial (...)
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  44. Toward a Decolonial Feminist Anticapitalism: María Lugones, Sylvia Wynter, and Sayak Valencia.Ashley J. Bohrer - 2020 - Hypatia 35 (3):524-541.
    This article traces the centrality of capitalism in the work of three decolonial feminists: María Lugones, Sylvia Wynter, and Sayek Valencia. Elaborating on the role of capitalism in each of their work separately, I argue that each of these thinkers conceptualizes capitalism in a novel and urgent way, charting new directions for both theory and social movement practice. I thus argue that the decolonial feminist tradition holds crucial philosophical and historical resources for understanding the emergence of capitalism and its endurance.
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  45. Privileged Ignorance, “World”-Traveling, and Epistemic Tourism.Melanie Bowman - 2020 - Hypatia 35 (3):475-489.
    In this article I am concerned with how relatively privileged people who wish to act in anti-oppressive ways respond to their own ignorance in ways that fall short of what is necessary for building coalitions against oppression. I consider María Lugones's sense of “world”-travel and José Medina's notion of epistemic friction-seeking as strategies for combating privileged ignorance, and assess how well they fare when put into practice by those suffering from privileged ignorance. Drawing on the resources of tourism studies, I (...)
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  46. Teaching Gloria E. Anzaldúa: Pedagogy and Practice for Our Classrooms and Communities.Margaret Cantú-Sánchez, Candace de León-Zepeda & Norma Elia Cantú (eds.) - 2020 - University of Arizona Press.
    Gloria Evangelina Anzaldúa—theorist, Chicana, feminist—famously called on scholars to do work that matters. This pronouncement was a rallying call, inspiring scholars across disciplines to become scholar-activists and to channel their intellectual energy and labor toward the betterment of society. Scholars and activists alike have encountered and expanded on these pathbreaking theories and concepts first introduced by Anzaldúa in Borderlands/La frontera and other texts. Teaching Gloria E. Anzaldúa is a pragmatic and inspiring offering of how to apply Anzaldúa’s ideas to the (...)
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  47. Embodied Genealogies: Anzaldúa, Nietzsche, and Diverse Epistemic Practice.Natalie Cisneros - 2020 - In Andrea Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 188-203.
    This chapter shows how Friedrich Nietzsche’s work on genealogy can be read critically and strategically alongside Gloria Anzaldúa’s thought to develop a conception of “embodied genealogy” as a mode of critical, historical, and transformative philosophical practice. Anzaldúa’s thought resonates with Nietzsche’s conception of genealogy, a method of philosophical practice that sheds critical light on dominant ways of knowing by calling into question assumptions about historical necessity and rational progress. Reading Anzaldúa’s work through this lens sheds light on her contributions to (...)
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  48. African, Latina, Feminist, and Decolonial: Marta Moreno Vega's Remembrance of Life in El Barrio in the 1950s.Theresa Delgadillo - 2020 - In Andrea Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 157-170.
    This essay proposes that Marta Moreno Vega’s 2004 memoir, When the Spirits Dance Mambo, is a Latina feminist narrative that foregrounds African diaspora worldviews, thought, forms, and practices as resources for cultivating a path toward decoloniality. In this memoir, Abuela’s spiritual leadership and her introduction of the young Cotito into the practice of Espiritismo become a central prism through which Cotito innovatively apprehends the links between sacred and secular realms in the burgeoning mambo and salsa music scene of New York. (...)
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  49. Hallucinating Knowing: (Extra)ordinary Consciousness, More-Than-Human Perception, and Other Decolonizing Remedios within Latina and Xicana Feminist Theories.Pedro J. DiPietro - 2020 - In Andrea Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press. pp. 220-236.
    Through ancestral and submerged sensual repertoires, through healing practices, spoken word poetry, and other forms of psychic praxis, Latina and Xicana feminist theorizing resists the westernizing idioms of cognitive impairment. This chapter examines the ways that the coloniality of gender—as an injunction to inhabit heterosexualist, human-centered, notions of sanity—exclude Latina and Xicana experience and knowledge from the realm of cognitive accuracy. It suggests that heterosexualism creates conditions for hallucinations to arise within Latinx communities. Specifically, it explores healing traditions several centuries (...)
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  50. After the Hurricane: Afro-Latina Decolonial Feminisms and Destierro.Yomaira Figueroa - 2020 - Hypatia 35 (1):220-229.
    The first version of this piece was written for the opening panel of the 2017 Conference of the Association for Feminist Ethics and Social Theory in Florida. The panel, “Decolonial Feminism: Theories and Praxis,” offered the opportunity for Black and Latinx feminist philosophers and decolonial scholars to consider their arrival to decolonial feminisms, their various points of emergence, and the utility of decolonial politics for liberation movements and organizing. I was prepared to discuss some genealogies of US Latina decolonial feminisms (...)
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