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  1. Methodological Deflationism and Semantic Theories.Adam C. Podlaskowski - 2022 - Erkenntnis 87 (3):1415-1422.
    Methodological deflationism is a policy about how we should conduct ourselves when it comes to theories of truth: in particular, a deflationary theory of truth should be taken as one’s starting point, and the notion of truth should be inflated only as necessary. This policy is motivated, in part, by the need to balance the theoretical virtue of parsimony with that of explanatory sufficiency. In this article, the case is made that the methodological deflationist is in no position to properly (...)
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  2. Modal Pluralism and Higher-Order Logic.Justin Clarke-Doane & William McCarthy - forthcoming - Philosophical Perspectives.
    In this article, we discuss a simple argument that modal metaphysics is misconceived, and responses to it. Unlike Quine’s, this argument begins with the banal observation that there are different candidate interpretations of the predicate ‘could have been the case’. This is analogous to the observation that there are different candidate interpretations of the predicate ‘is a member of’. The argument then infers that the search for metaphysical necessities is misguided in much the way the ‘set-theoretic pluralist’ (Clarke-Doane & Hamkins (...)
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  3. Vagueness-Induced Counterexamples to Modus Tollens.Tom Beevers - 2021 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 120 (3):405-416.
    I argue that vagueness produces counterexamples to modus tollens. I begin by outlining cases where indicative and counterfactual conditionals seem intuitively to be determinate even when their antecedents are borderline and their consequents are determinately false. Accepting these intuitions has some revisionary implications; however, rejecting them leads to unacceptable consequences for our knowledge of conditionals. I thus take it that we should accept that our intuitions are reliable. I show it follows that modus tollens fails. I conclude by defending this (...)
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  4. Introduction to Conditionals, Paradox, and Probability: Themes From the Philosophy of Dorothy Edgington.Lee Walters - 2021 - In Lee Walters & John Hawthorne (eds.), Conditionals, Paradox, and Probability: Themes from the Philosophy of Dorothy Edgington. Oxford University press.
    Dorothy Edgington’s work has been at the centre of a range of ongoing debates in philosophical logic, philosophy of mind and language, metaphysics, and epistemology. This work has focused, although by no means exclusively, on the overlapping areas of conditionals, probability, and paradox. In what follows, I briefly sketch some themes from these three areas relevant to Dorothy’s work, highlighting how some of Dorothy’s work and some of the contributions of this volume fit in to these debates.
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  5. Superhard Choices.Miguel F. Dos Santos - 2020 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 98 (2):248-265.
    Sometimes, when comparing a pair of items, it appears that neither is better than the other, nor that they are equally good, relative to a certain value that they bear. Cases of this kind have come to be referred to as superhard comparisons. What grounds superhard comparisons? On the dominant views, held by Joseph Raz and Ruth Chang, they are grounded, at least partially, in the failure of the three classic value relations—‘better than’, ‘worse than’, and ‘equally good’. On an (...)
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  6. Being Metaphysically Unsettled: Barnes and Williams on Metaphysical Indeterminacy and Vagueness.Matti Eklund - 2011 - Oxford Studies in Metaphysics 6:6.
    This chapter discusses the defence of metaphysical indeterminacy by Elizabeth Barnes and Robert Williams and discusses a classical and bivalent theory of such indeterminacy. Even if metaphysical indeterminacy arguably is intelligible, Barnes and Williams argue in favour of it being so and this faces important problems. As for classical logic and bivalence, the chapter problematizes what exactly is at issue in this debate. Can reality not be adequately described using different languages, some classical and some not? Moreover, it is argued (...)
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  7. Moral Realism and Semantic Accounts of Moral Vagueness.Ali Abasnezhad - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy:1-13.
    Miriam Schoenfield argues that moral realism and moral vagueness imply ontic vagueness. In particular, she argues that neither shifty nor rigid semantic accounts of vagueness can provide a satisfactory explanation of moral vagueness for moral realists. This paper constitutes a response. I argue that Schoenfield's argument against the shifty semantic account presupposes that moral indeterminacies can, in fact, be resolved determinately by crunching through linguistic data. I provide different reasons for rejecting this assumption. Furthermore, I argue that Schoenfield's rejection of (...)
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  8. Some Endeavours at Synthesising a Solution to the Sorites.Shane Ralston - 1999 - Minerva - An Internet Journal of Philosophy 3 (1).
    ‘Puzzles’, ‘word games’, ‘logical anomalies’, whatever we call them, they perplex us and challenge our familiar patterns of reasoning. One of these puzzles, among many others, originated from the mind of an ancient Megarian logician, Eubulides of Miletus, and endures to the modern day.1 Its name, ‘sorites’, can be traced to the Greek word soros, meaning ‘heap.’ The answer to whether one grain of sand ‘is a heap’ or ‘is not a heap’ seems quite simple: it is not a heap. (...)
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  9. Verities, the Sorites, and Theseus’ Ship.Igor Douven - 2017 - Synthese 194 (10):3867-3878.
    Edgington has proposed a degree-theoretic account of vagueness that yields a highly elegant solution to the sorites paradox. This paper applies her account to the paradox of Theseus’ ship, which is generally classified among the paradoxes of material constitution and not as a sorites paradox.
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  10. Black and Hempel on Vagueness.Bertil Rolf - 1980 - Zeitschrift Für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 11 (2):332-346.
    Summary A. Vagueness is not definable in terms of behaviour (Section 4).
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  11. Vagueness in Psychiatry: An Overview.Geert Keil, Lara Keuck & Rico Hauswald - 2017 - In Geert Keil, Lara Keuck & Rico Hauswald (eds.), Vagueness in Psychiatry. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 3-23.
    In psychiatry there is no sharp boundary between the normal and the pathological. Although clear cases abound, it is often indeterminate whether a particular condition does or does not qualify as a mental disorder. For example, definitions of ‘subthreshold disorders’ and of the ‘prodromal stages’ of diseases are notoriously contentious. Philosophers and linguists call concepts that lack sharp boundaries, and thus admit of borderline cases, ‘vague’. This overview chapter reviews current debates about demarcation in psychiatry against the backdrop of key (...)
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  12. Logic, Epistemology, and the Unity of Science 33: On the Sorites Paradox.Bueno Otavio & Abasnezhad Ali (eds.) - forthcoming - Springer.
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  13. Vagueness: An Investigation Into Natural Languages and the Sorites Paradox.Roy A. Sorensen - 1994 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 54 (2):483-486.
  14. Vagueness and Endurance.E. J. Lowe - 2005 - Analysis 65 (2):104-112.
  15. The Lessons of the Many.Vann Mcgee & Brian P. Mclaughlin - 2000 - Philosophical Topics 28:129-152.
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  16. Vagueness. [REVIEW]Roy A. Sorensen - 1994 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 54 (2):483-486.
  17. Vagueness and Introspection.Denis Bonnay & Paul Egré - unknown
    Version of March 05, 2007. An extended abstract of the paper appeared in the Proceedings of the 2006 Prague Colloquium on "Reasoning about Vagueness and Uncertainty".
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  18. Another Argument Against Vague Objects.Francis Jeffry Pelletier - 1989 - Journal of Philosophy 86 (9):481.
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  19. III—Tolerating Vagueness.R. M. Sainsbury - 1989 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 89 (1):33-48.
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  20. Context, Interest Relativity and the Sorites.Jason Stanley - 2003 - Analysis 63 (4):269-280.
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  21. The Buried Quantifier: An Account of Vagueness and the Sorites.P. Grim - 2005 - Analysis 65 (2):95-104.
  22. Indeterminacy of Identity of Objects and Sets.Peter Woodruff & Terence Parsons - 1997 - Noûs 31 (S11):321-348.
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  23. Vagueness as a Psychological Notion.Lourdes Valdivia - 2000 - Philosophical Issues 10 (1):282-288.
  24. Vagueness-Related Attitudes.David Barnett - 2000 - Philosophical Issues 10 (1):302-320.
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  25. Vagueness.Bertrand Russell - 1923 - Australasian Journal of Psychology and Philosophy 1 (2):84-92.
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  26. Rethinking Bivalence.A. Iacona - 2005 - Synthese 146 (3):283-302.
    Classical logic rests on the assumption that there are two mutually exclusive and jointly exhaustive truth values. This assumption has always been surrounded by philosophical controversy. Doubts have been raised about its legitimacy, and hence about the legitimacy of classical logic. Usually, the assumption is stated in the form of a general principle, namely the principle that every proposition is either true or false. Then, the philosophical controversy is often framed in terms of the question whether every proposition is either (...)
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  27. On the Sorites Paradox.Otavio Bueno & Ali Abasnezhad (eds.) - forthcoming - Springer.
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  28. Borderline Cases, Incompatibilism, and Plurivaluationism.Paul Egré - 2015 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 90 (2):457-466.
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  29. Essay Thirteen. Higher-Order Vagueness for Partially Defined Predicates.Scott Soames - 2009 - In Philosophical Essays, Volume 2: The Philosophical Significance of Language. Princeton University Press. pp. 340-361.
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  30. 13. Vagueness and the Law.Scott Soames - 2014 - In Analytic Philosophy in America: And Other Historical and Contemporary Essays. Princeton University Press. pp. 281-298.
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  31. The Sorites Paradox.David Clapham - 1987 - Dissertation, University of Oxford (United Kingdom)
    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. ;An attempt is made to find the proper response to paradoxes of the sorites-type. In PART I, a chain argument is given with 'tall' in which it seems that a false conclusion is derived by repeated steps of MPP from true premises. In particular, each of the conditional premises is derived by UE from a so-called inductive premise sustained by familiar claims that 'tall' is both vague and observational. (...)
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  32. Vagueness.Thomas Rost Kearns - 1968 - Dissertation, The University of Wisconsin - Madison
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  33. Sur le Vague En Mathématiques.André Weil G. G. Granger - 1990 - Dialectica 44 (1-2):9-22.
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  34. Is ‘Everything’ Precise?Dan Lópezde Sa - 2006 - Dialectica 60 (4):397-409.
    There are certain metaphysically interesting arguments ‘from vagueness’, for unrestricted mereological composition and for four‐dimensionalism, which involve a claim to the effect that idioms for unrestricted quantification are precise. An elaboration of Lewis’ argument for this claim, which assumes the view of vagueness as semantic indecision, is presented. It is argued that the argument also works according to other views on the nature of vagueness, which also require for an expression to be vague that there are different admissible alternatives of (...)
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  35. Logic, Semantics, Ontology.Richard Gustave Heck - 1991 - Dissertation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    Logic, Semantics, Ontology consists of three papers concerned with ontological issues. The first, "That There Might Be Vague Objects", is a critical study of Gareth Evans's essay, "Can There be Vague Objects". The author argues that the formal argument presented in Evans's paper is valid and that a contradiction can indeed be derived from the statement that it is indeterminate whether a is b. However, the deduction theorem fails in the required logic: Hence, one can not derive the validity of (...)
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  36. Vagueness, Boundarylessness and Communication.Matthew Carmody - 2005 - The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 1.
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  37. Language, Logic and Method.Robert S. Cohen & Marx W. Wartofsky (eds.) - 1983 - Springer, Dordrecht.
    Fundamental problems of the uses of formal techniques and of natural and instrumental practices have been raised again and again these past two decades, in many quarters and from varying viewpoints. We have brought a number of quite basic studies of these issues together in this volume, not linked con ceptually nor by any rigorously defined problematic, but rather simply some of the most interesting and even provocative of recent research accomplish ments. Most of these papers are derived from the (...)
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  38. Mo Hu Mei Xue.Mingju Wang - 1992
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  39. Borderline Cases and Epistemic Possibilities.Zoltan Vecsey - 2011 - Philosophy Pathways 164.
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  40. May Judges Sometimes Lie?: Remarks On Sorensen's Views Of Vagueness And Law.Jason Glenn - 2007 - Sorites 18:10-16.
    Clearly, vagueness is an inevitable feature of natural language. The practice of law, which is necessarily done within the confines of language, must inevitably come to grips with the phenomenon of vagueness. What philosophers working with these concerns tend to debate about is the extent to which vagueness affects law and the role that vagueness plays therein. Roy Sorensen argues that vagueness in law is not functional and therefore to be avoided as much as possible by judges. Sorensen equates the (...)
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  41. On the Semantic Indecision of Vague Singular Terms.Dan de Sa - 2007 - Sorites 19:88-91.
    According to a popular, plausible, but also controversial view about the nature of vagueness, vagueness is a matter of semantic indecision. I show that, even if «I» is vague and the view of vagueness as semantic indecision is correct, I could be a material composite object all the same.
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  42. Ontic Vagueness in Microphysics.Silvio Chibeni - 2004 - Sorites 15:29-41.
    This article aims to examine the import of science to the contemporary philosophical debate on ontic vagueness. It is shown, first, that our best theory on the structure of mater, quantum mechanics, clearly ascribes vague properties to objects. This point is explained by both a general theoretical analysis and by some simple examples. The advantage of these examples over that which has been hotly discussed in the literature is underlined. Secondly, it is pointed out that stronger evidence for the existence (...)
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  43. Vagueness and the Law: Philosophical and Legal Approaches.Ralf Keil & Poscher, Geert (ed.) - forthcoming - Not yet known.
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  44. Indeterminate Comprehension.Jonathan A. Simon - 2014 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):39-48.
    Can we solve the Problem of the Many, and give a general account of the indeterminacy in definite descriptions that give rise to it, by appealing to metaphysically indeterminate entities? I argue that we cannot. I identify a feature common to the relevant class of definite descriptions, and derive a contradiction from the claim that each such description is satisfied by a metaphysically indeterminate entity.
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  45. Vagueness and Identity. A Granular Approach.Silvia Gaio - 2010 - Dissertation, University of Padova
    In this research work I take into account the relation of indistinguishability. This relation seems to be prima facie reflexive, symmetric and transitive; in short, an equivalence relation. However, there are some cases where the relation under consideration fails to be transitive. In this thesis I will discuss two of those cases: vagueness of gradabale adjectives and count nouns, and identity criteria involving perceptual phenomena. My research attempts to answer the following question: how is it possible to communicate and to (...)
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  46. On the Intuitionistic Solution of the Sorites Paradox.Peter Mott - 1994 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 75:133-150.
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  47. Gap Principles, Penumbral Consequence, and Infinitely Higher-Order Vagueness.Delia Graff - 2004 - In J. C. Beall (ed.), Liars and Heaps: New Essays on Paradox. Clarendon Press.
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  48. Higher-Order Vagueness for Partially Defined Predicates.Scott Soames - 2003 - In J. C. Beall (ed.), Liars and Heaps: New Essays on Paradox. Clarendon Press.
    A theory of higher-order vagueness for partially-defined, context-sensitive predicates like is blue is offered. According to the theory, the predicate is determinately blue means roughly is an object o such that the claim that o is blue is a necessary consequence of the rules of the language plus the underlying non-linguistic facts in the world. Because the question of which rules count as rules of the language is itself vague, the predicate is determinately blue is both vague and partial in (...)
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  49. A Site for Sorites.Graham Priest - 2004 - In J. C. Beall (ed.), Liars and Heaps: New Essays on Paradox. Clarendon Press.
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  50. Sorensen on Vagueness and Contradiction.Dorothy Edgington - 2010 - In Richard Dietz & Sebastiano Moruzzi (eds.), Cuts and Clouds: Vaguenesss, its Nature and its Logic. Oxford University Press.
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