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  1. Assessment, Truth and Religious Studies.John Tillson - forthcoming - Studies in Philosophy and Education:1–16.
    This paper addresses the question of what should determine whether students’ answers to closed questions are marked as correct or incorrect in the context of formal religious education, and when their answers to open ended questions should be given more or less credit. Drawing on insights from Craig Bourne, Emily Caddick Bourne and Clare Jarmy, I argue that a combination of judged truth, and a range of well-argued cases about what ought to be believed given certain premises should constrain these (...)
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  2. The Open Future Square of Opposition: A Defense.Elijah Hess - 2017 - Sophia 56 (4):573-587.
    This essay explores the validity of Gregory Boyd’s open theistic account of the nature of the future. In particular, it is an investigation into whether Boyd’s logical square of opposition for future contingents provides a model of reality for free will theists that can preserve both bivalence and a classical conception of omniscience. In what follows, I argue that it can.
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  3. Degrees of Belief, Expected and Actual.Rosanna Keefe - 2017 - Synthese 194 (10):3789-3800.
    A framework of degrees of belief, or credences, is often advocated to model our uncertainty about how things are or will turn out. It has also been employed in relation to the kind of uncertainty or indefiniteness that arises due to vagueness, such as when we consider “a is F” in a case where a is borderline F. How should we understand degrees of belief when we take into account both these phenomena? Can the right kind of theory of the (...)
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  4. Lopsided Lives.Theron Pummer - 2017 - In Mark Timmons (ed.), Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 275-296.
    Intuitively there are many different things that non-derivatively contribute to well-being: pleasure, desire satisfaction, knowledge, friendship, love, rationality, freedom, moral virtue, and appreciation of true beauty. According to pluralism, at least two different types of things non-derivatively contribute to well-being. Lopsided lives score very low in terms of some types of things that putatively non-derivatively contribute to well-being, but very high in terms of other such types of things. I argue that pluralists essentially face a trilemma about lopsided lives: they (...)
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  5. Disease as a Vague and Thick Cluster Concept.Geert Keil & Ralf Stoecker - 2017 - In Geert Keil, Lara Keuck & Rico Hauswald (eds.), Vagueness in Psychiatry. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 46-74.
    This chapter relates the problem of demarcating the pathological from the non-pathological in psychiatry to the general problem of defining ‘disease’ in the philosophy of medicine. Section 2 revisits three prominent debates in medical nosology: naturalism versus normativism, the three dimensions of illness, sickness, and disease, and the demarcation problem. Sections 3–5 reformulate the demarcation problem in terms of semantic vagueness. ‘Disease’ exhibits vagueness of degree by drawing no sharp line in a continuum and is combinatorially vague because there are (...)
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  6. Vagueness and Law: Philosophical and Legal Perspectives.Hrafn Asgeirsson - 2016 - Oxford University Press.
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  7. Temporal Externalism and Epistemic Theories of Vagueness.Henry Jackman - 2007 - The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 6:77-83.
    'Epistemic' accounts of vagueness argue that so called 'borderline' cases of a term actually always do fall within that term's extension. What makes the case borderline is that this fact may be unknowable. Such epistemic theories have traditionally been taken to be unable to accommodate the intuitive connection between meaning and use. However, it will be argued here that if one endorses a type of 'Temporal Externalism' about meaning, then one can both endorse epistemic accounts of vagueness and hold on (...)
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  8. A Note on the Linguistic Determinacy in the Legal Context.Iwona Witczak-Plisiecka - 2009 - Lodz Papers in Pragmatics 5 (2):201-226.
    A Note on the Linguistic Determinacy in the Legal Context This paper discusses linguistic vagueness in the context of a semantically restricted domain of legal language. It comments on selected aspects of vagueness found in contemporary English normative legal texts and on terminological problems related to vagueness and indeterminacy both in the legal domain and language in general. The discussion is illustrated with selected corpus examples of vagueness in English legal language and attempts to show problems of the relation between (...)
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  9. Vagueness. [REVIEW]Roy A. Sorensen - 1994 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 54 (2):483-486.
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  10. The No-Proposition View of Vagueness.Paula Sweeney - 2016 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 93 (2):179-195.
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  11. Vagueness in Psychiatry.Geert Keil, Lara Keuck & Rico Hauswald (eds.) - 2017 - Oxford: Oxford University Press UK.
    In psychiatry there is no sharp boundary between the normal and the pathological. Although clear cases abound, it is often indeterminate whether a particular condition does or does not qualify as a mental disorder. For example, definitions of ‘subthreshold disorders’ and of the ‘prodromal stages’ of diseases are notoriously contentious. -/- Philosophers and linguists call concepts that lack sharp boundaries, and thus admit of borderline cases, ‘vague’. Although blurred boundaries between the normal and the pathological are a recurrent theme in (...)
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  12. Vagueness and the Laws of Metaphysics.Ryan Wasserman - 2017 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 95 (1):66-89.
    This is a paper about the nature of metaphysical laws and their relation to the phenomenon of vagueness. Metaphysical laws are introduced as analogous to natural laws, and metaphysical indeterminism is modeled on causal indeterminacy. This kind of indeterminacy is then put to work in developing a novel theory of vagueness and a solution to the sorites paradox.
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  13. The Refutation of Indeterminacy.Jerrold J. Katz - 1988 - Journal of Philosophy 85 (5):227.
  14. IX—Loose Talk.Dan Sperber & Deirdre Wilson - 1985 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 86 (1):153-172.
  15. X—Meaning, Bivalence and Realism.Dorothy Edgington - 1981 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 81 (1):153-174.
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  16. Borderline Science.Eugene Cittadino - 2004 - Isis 95 (2):183-219.
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  17. Adaptive Resonance Theory as a Model of Polysemy and Vagueness in the Cognitive Lexicon.George Dunbar - 2012 - Cognitive Linguistics 23 (3).
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  18. Vagueness's Puzzles, Polysemy's Vagaries.Dirk Geeraerts - 1993 - Cognitive Linguistics 4 (3):223-272.
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  19. The Worseness of Nonexistence.Theron Pummer - forthcoming - In Saving People from the Harm of Death. Oxford University Press.
    Most believe that it is worse for a person to die than to continue to exist with a good life. At the same time, many believe that it is not worse for a merely possible person never to exist than to exist with a good life. I argue that if the underlying properties that make us the sort of thing we essentially are can come in small degrees, then to maintain this commonly-held pair of beliefs we will have to embrace (...)
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  20. Multiple Reference and Vague Objects.Giovanni Merlo - 2017 - Synthese 194 (7):2645-2666.
    Kilimanjaro is an example of what some philosophers would call a ‘vague object’: it is only roughly 5895 m tall, its weight is not precise and its boundaries are fuzzy because some particles are neither determinately part of it nor determinately not part of it. It has been suggested that this vagueness arises as a result of semantic indecision: it is because we didn’t make up our mind what the expression “Kilimanjaro” applies to that we can truthfully say such things (...)
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  21. Metaphysical or Linguistic Indeterminacy? A Reply to Hendrickson’s Reply.Katarzyna Paprzycka - 2015 - Journal of Philosophical Research 40:293-296.
    In reply to my criticism of his argument for the fine-grained theory of action individuation, Hendrickson proposes a new argument. He notes that there is a kind of indeterminacy with respect to Caesar’s death in the case of Brutus’s stabbing of Caesar that is missing in the case of Brutus’s killing of Caesar. He argues that the best explanation for the indeterminacy is given by the fine-grained view. I show that the argument fails for similar reasons. Minimalists have good reasons (...)
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  22. On the Epistemic Status of Borderline Cases.Zoltán Vecsey - 2012 - Principia: An International Journal of Epistemology 16 (1):179-184.
    n this paper I argue that the epistemicist account of vagueness cannot be entirely correct. After analysing the main features of Williamson’s view, I propose a novel approachto the epistemological problem of borderline cases.
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  23. Knowledge in Borderline Cases.S. Rosenkranz - 2005 - Analysis 65 (1):49-55.
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  24. Partial Belief and Borderline Cases.Jorge Rodríguez Marqueze - 2000 - Philosophical Issues 10 (1):289-301.
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  25. Vagueness and Partial Belief.Stephen Schiffer - 2000 - Philosophical Issues 10 (1):220-257.
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  26. Stephen Schiffer's Theory of Vagueness.Paul Horwich - 2000 - Philosophical Issues 10 (1):271-281.
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  27. Fara’s Formula and the Supervaluational Thin Red Line.Alex Peter Malpass - 2013 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 28 (2):267-282.
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  28. A Really Fuzzy Approach to the Sorites Paradox.Francesco Paoli - 2003 - Synthese 134 (3):363-387.
  29. Beyond the Letter : A Philosophical Inquiry Into Ambiguity, Vagueness and Methaphor in Language.Israel Scheffler - 2010 - Routledge.
    Ambiguity, vagueness and metaphor are pervasive features of language, deserving of systematic study in their own right. Yet they have frequently been considered mere deviations from ideal language or obstacles to be avoided in the construction of scientific systems. First published in 1979, _Beyond the Letter_ offers a consecutive study of these features from a philosphical point of view, providing analyses of each and treating their relations to one another. Addressed to the fundamental task of logical and semantic explanation, the (...)
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  30. Betweenity: A Discussion of the Concept of Borderline.Judy Gammelgaard - 2010 - Routledge.
    From its inception psychoanalysis has sought to effect a cure through the therapeutic relationship between analyst and analysand. _Betweenity _looks at what happens when the established framework of the psychoanalytic process is challenged by those with borderline personalities. In this book Judy Gammelgaard looks at how we might understand the analysand who is unable to engage with therapy and how we might bring them to a point where they are able to do so. Areas of discussion include: the border between (...)
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  31. The Borderline Psychotic Child: A Selective Integration.Trevor Lubbe (ed.) - 2000 - Routledge.
    _The Borderline Psychotic Child_ reviews the history and evolution of the borderline diagnosis for children, both in the USA and the UK, bringing the reader up to date with current clinical opinion on the subject. Using a range of clinical case studies, the book attempts to harmonise US and UK views on borderline diagnosis in the light of new developments in theory at The Menninger Clinic, The Anna Freud Centre and The Tavistock Clinic. Providing an introduction to the borderline concept, (...)
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  32. Excluded Knowledge.Christian Ryan Lee - 2016 - Synthese 193 (8):1-26.
    Does vagueness exclude knowledge? After arguing for an affirmative answer to this question, I consider a fascinating objection. Barnett offers purported counterexamples to the following: Vagueness as to whether p entails that nobody knows whether p. These putative counterexamples, were they successful, would establish that standard accounts of vagueness are mistaken. I defend three central theses: First, whenever it is vague whether p competent speakers would be ambivalent about whether p when considering whether p, and such ambivalence would exclude knowledge (...)
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  33. The Logical Roots of Indeterminacy.Gila Sher - 1999 - In G. Sher & R. Tieszen (eds.), Between Logic and Intuition: Essays in Honor of Charles Parsons. pp. 491-524.
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  34. A Live Language: Concreteness, Openness, Ambivalence.Hili Razinsky - 2015 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 15 (1):51-65.
    Wittgenstein has shown that that life, in the sense that applies in the first place to human beings, is inherently linguistic. In this paper, I ask what is involved in language, given that it is thus essential to life, answering that language – or concepts – must be both alive and the ground for life. This is explicated by a Wittgensteinian series of entailments of features. According to the first feature, concepts are not intentional engagements. The second feature brings life (...)
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  35. Pragmatic Interpretations of Vague Expressions: Strongest Meaning and Nonmonotonic Consequence.Pablo Cobreros, Paul Egré, Dave Ripley & Robert van Rooij - 2015 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 44 (4):375-393.
    Recent experiments have shown that naive speakers find borderline contradictions involving vague predicates acceptable. In Cobreros et al. we proposed a pragmatic explanation of the acceptability of borderline contradictions, building on a three-valued semantics. In a reply, Alxatib et al. show, however, that the pragmatic account predicts the wrong interpretations for some examples involving disjunction, and propose as a remedy a semantic analysis instead, based on fuzzy logic. In this paper we provide an explicit global pragmatic interpretation rule, based on (...)
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  36. Human Knowledge: Its Scope and Limits.Bertrand Russell - 2009 - Routledge.
    How do we know what we "know"? How did we –as individuals and as a society – come to accept certain knowledge as fact? In _Human Knowledge,_ Bertrand Russell questions the reliability of our assumptions on knowledge. This brilliant and controversial work investigates the relationship between ‘individual’ and ‘scientific’ knowledge. First published in 1948, this provocative work contributed significantly to an explosive intellectual discourse that continues to this day.
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  37. Future Contingents, Indeterminacy and Context.Paula Sweeney - 2015 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 96 (2):408-422.
    In Facing the Future, Belnap et al. reject bivalence and propose double time reference semantics to give a pragmatic response to the following assertion problem: how can we make sense of assertions about future events made at a time when the outcomes of those events are not yet determined? John MacFarlane employs the same semantics, now bolstered with a relative-truth predicate, to accommodate the following apparently conflicting intuitions regarding the truth-value of an uttered future contingent: at the moment of utterance, (...)
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  38. Vagueness and Omniscience.Elisa Paganini - 2015 - In Miroslaw Szatkowski (ed.), God, Truth, and Other Enigmas. De Gruyter. pp. 89-96.
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  39. Paraconsistent Vs. Contextual Solutions to Sorites.Joanna Odrowąż-Sypniewska - 2013 - Polish Journal of Philosophy 7 (2):21-36.
    In my paper I argue that a successful theory of vagueness should be able to account for faultless disagreement concerning borderline cases.Firstly, I claim that out of the traditional conceptions of vagueness the best equipped to account for faultless disagreement areparaconsistent solutions. One worry concerning dialetheism is that it seems to allow not only for faultless disagreements between different speakers, but also for such ‘disagreements’ between the given speaker and himself. Another worry, at least for some people, is that subvaluationism (...)
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  40. Chapter Four. Indeterminacy.John P. Burgess & Alexis G. Burgess - 2014 - In John P. Burgess & Alexis G. Burgess (eds.), Truth. Princeton University Press. pp. 52-67.
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  41. Chapter One. Indeterminacy.Russell Hardin - 2013 - In Indeterminacy and Society. Princeton University Press. pp. 1-15.
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  42. The Logic of Vagueness.Gordon P. Baker - 1970
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  43. Moral Indeterminacy.Russell Scott Shafer-Landau - 1992 - Dissertation, The University of Arizona
    My dissertation focuses on issues of indeterminacy in ethics and the philosophy of law. My aim is to establish the existence of moral indeterminacy and to show how we can allow some degree of indeterminacy in both ethics and the law without necessarily abandoning objectivist positions that may withstand noncognitivist or legal realist criticisms. ;The dissertation is divided into two parts. In the first, I devote a chapter to each of three sources of moral indeterminacy. The first chapter focuses on (...)
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  44. Arguing for the Existence of God in the Age of Quantum Indeterminacy.Evan Cockshaw - 2001 - Quodlibet 3.
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  45. Vagueness, Arbitrariness and Matching.C. Mason Myers - 1985 - International Logic Review 31:25.
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  46. C. S. Peirce's Logic of Vagueness.Jarrett Ernest Brock - 1969 - Dissertation, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
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  47. Edmund Husserl's Description of Vague Judgment.Allen H. Vigneron - 1987 - Dissertation, The Catholic University of America
    The act of judging how matters stand was a subject of investigation for Husserl throughout his career. The recurrence of this theme in his work indicates the great importance which Husserlian phenomenology attributed to the task of uncovering the nature of judgment. Scholarly commentary on Husserl has, until now, lacked one of the essential elements for a complete account of Husserl on judgment, because there was no full-length investigation into the important theme of "vague judgment" in his writings. ;This dissertation (...)
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  48. On Vagueness.Arnold Jensen Chien - 1987 - Dissertation, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  49. Borderline Cases, a Problem in Predicating.Kenton Frank Machina - 1968 - Dissertation, University of California, Los Angeles
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  50. Indeterminacy Still Lurks: A Reply to Carney and Van Straaten.Edward L. Schoen - 1976 - Foundations of Language 14 (2):243-245.
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