Related categories
Subcategories:
583 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Order:
1 — 50 / 583
Material to categorize
  1. Keith Allen & Tom Stoneham (eds.) (2010). Causation and Modern Philosophy. Routledge.
    A collection of new essays on causation in the period from Galileo to Lady Mary Shepherd (roughly 1600-1850). Contributors: David Wootton, Tad Schmaltz, William Eaton and Robert Higgerson, Eric Schliesser, Pauline Phemister, Timothy Stanton, Peter Millican, Constantine Sandis, Boris Hennig, Angela Breitenbach, Stathis Psillos, and Martha Brandt Bolton.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  2. Jerrold L. Aronson (2003). Causation and Persistence. International Studies in Philosophy 35 (4):237-239.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Jerrold L. Aronson (1982). Untangling Ontology From Epistemology in Causation. Erkenntnis 18 (3):293 - 305.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  4. Gennaro Auletta (2016). Networks and Causation Top-Down. Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 72 (1):171-180.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Bruce Aune (1977). Reason and Action. --. Holland, Boston, D. Reidel Pub. Co.
  6. James Austin (1978). Systemic Causation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 9 (2):83-97.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. R. Ballarin (2014). Disjunctive Effects and the Logic of Causation. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 65 (1):21-38.
    We argue in favor of merely disjunctive effects, namely cases in which an event or fact, C, is not a cause of an effect, E1, and is also not a cause of a distinct effect, E2, and yet C is a cause of the disjunctive effect. Disjunctive effects let us retain the additivity and the distributivity of causation. According to additivity, if C is a cause of E1 and C is a cause of E2, then C is a cause of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Christian von Bar (2009). Chapter 4: Causation. In Non-Contractual Liability Arising Out of Damage Caused to Another. Sellier de Gruyter.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Jordan Bartol (2013). Causality in the Sciences. Edited by Russo, Williamson and Illari. Oxford University Press, 2011, Pp. 952, £95. ISBN: 978-0-19-957413-1. [REVIEW] Philosophy 88 (3):487-493.
  10. Jaromír Bartos (1977). Problémy Kauzální Metody a Historického Výkladu Pojm U. Academia.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Steven M. Bayne (2003). Kant on Causation: On the Fivefold Routes to the Principle of Causation. State University of New York Press.
    _An in-depth examination of the nature of Kant's causal principle._.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Zach Beckstead, Kenneth R. Cabell & Jaan Valsiner (2009). Generalizing Through Conditional Analysis: Systemic Causality in the World of Eternal Becoming. Humana.Mente 11:65-80.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Helen Beebee (2001). Recent Work on Causation. Philosophical Books 42 (1):33-45.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Joseph Berkovitz (2002). On Causal Loops in the Quantum Realm. In T. Placek & J. Butterfield (eds.), Non-Locality and Modality. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 235--257.
  15. Joseph Berkovitz (2000). The Nature of Causality in Quantum Phenomena. Theoria 15 (1):87-122.
    The correlations between distant systems in typical quantum situations, such as Einstein-Podolosky-Rosen experiments, strongly suggest that the quantum realm involves curious types of non-Iocal influences. In this paper, I study in detail the nature of these non-Iocal influences, as depicted by various quantum theories. I show how different quantum theories realise non-Iocality in different ways, whichreflect different ontological settings.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Gunnar Björnsson (2007). How Effects Depend on Their Causes, Why Causal Transitivity Fails, and Why We Care About Causation. Philosophical Studies 133 (3):349-390.
    Despite recent efforts to improve on counterfactual theories of causation, failures to explain how effects depend on their causes are still manifest in a variety of cases. In particular, theories that do a decent job explaining cases of causal preemption have problems accounting for cases of causal intransitivity. Moreover, the increasing complexity of the counterfactual accounts makes it difficult to see why the concept of causation would be such a central part of our cognition. In this paper, I propose an (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  17. Paul D. Bowen (1983). Causation in Classical Physics. Synthese 57 (1):1 - 20.
    In summary, then, I have presented a program for analysis of physical causal statements in terms of the following metaphysical primitives: space (made up of ordered points), time (also ordered and punctiliar), causal density, haecceity and causal necessity. These can be ‘read off’ the theories in question. I claim that theevent-singular cases are crucial, and that other cases can be reduced to this via set theory and (causal) modal logic. I have given several examples of this sort of translation and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. David Braddon-Mitchell (1993). The Microstructural Causation Hypothesis. Erkenntnis 39 (2):257 - 283.
    I argue against a priori objections to the view that causation may be reducible to some micro-structural process in principle discoverable by physics. I distinguish explanation from causation, and argue that the main objections to such a reduction stem from conflating these two notions. Explanation is the collection of pragmatically relevant, possibly counterfactual information about causation; and causation is to be identified in a necessary a posteriori way with whatever physical processes underwrite our explanatory claims.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  19. Braham Matthew & Hees Martin van (2009). Degrees of Causation. Erkenntnis 71 (3):323 - 344.
    The primary aim of this paper is to analyze the concept of degrees of causal contribution for actual events and examine the way in which it can be formally defined. This should go some way to filling out a gap in the legal and philosophical literature on causation. By adopting the conception of a cause as a necessary element of a sufficient set (the so-called NESS test) we show that the concept of degrees of causation can be given clear and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  20. Robert Martin Brier (1970). The Problem of Backward Causation. Dissertation, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Erik Brown (1979). The Direction of Causation. Mind 88 (351):334-350.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Laurie Brown (1989). Discovering Alvarez: Selected Works of Luis W. Alvarez, with Commentary by His Students and Colleagues. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 22 (3):383-384.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Mario Bunge (2006). 4. Causation and Chance: Apparent or Real? In Chasing Reality: Strife Over Realism. University of Toronto Press. pp. 88-118.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Ronald Burr (1975). Footnote on Cua on Practical Causation. Philosophy East and West 25 (1):11-12.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. John Carroll, Chapter 13 Anti-Reductionism.
    showing what makes causal facts both true and accessible enough for us to have the knowledge of them that we ordinarily take ourselves to have. Some current approaches to analyzing causation were once resisted. First, analyses that use the counterfactual conditional were viewed with suspicion because philosophers also sought (and still do seek) similar understanding of counterfactual facts. Since the same can be said for the other nomic concepts--causation, lawhood, explanation, chance, dispositions, and their conceptual kin--philosophy demonstrated a preference for (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. John W. Carroll (1992). The Unanimity Theory and Probabilistic Sufficiency. Philosophy of Science 59 (3):471-479.
    The unanimity theory is an account of property-level causation requiring that causes raise the probability of their effects in specified test situations. Richard Otte (1981) and others have presented counterexamples in which one property is probabilistically sufficient for at least one other property. Given the continuing discussion (e.g., Cartwright 1989; Cartwright and Dupre 1988; Eells 1988a,b), many apparently think that these problems are minor. By considering the impact of Otte's cases on recent versions of the theory, by raising several new (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. John W. Carroll (1988). General Causation. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1988:311 - 317.
    The traditional model and the contextual unanimity model are two probabilistic accounts of general causation subject to many well-known problems; e.g. cases of epiphenomena, causes raising their own probability, effects raising the probability of the cause, et cetera. After reviewing these problems and raising a new problem for the two models, I suggest the beginnings of an alternative probabilistic account. My suggestion avoids the problems encountered by earlier models, in large part, by an appeal to singular causation.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  28. V. C. Chappell (1963). Causation and the Identification of Actions: Comments. Journal of Philosophy 60 (23):700-701.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Patricia W. Cheng (1997). From Covariation to Causation: A Causal Power Theory. Psychological Review 104 (2):367-405.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   20 citations  
  30. S. Choi (2002). The 'Actual Events' Clause in Noordhof's Account of Causation. Analysis 62 (1):41-46.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. David Danks Clark Glymour, Frederick Eberhardt Bruce Glymour, Richard Scheines Joseph Ramsey, Choh Man Teng Peter Spirtes & Jiji Zhang (forthcoming). Actual Causation: A Stone Soup Essay. Synthese.
    We argue that current discussions of criteria for actual causation are ill-posed in several respects. (1) The methodology of current discussions is by induction from intuitions about an infinitesimal fraction of the possible examples and counterexamples; (2) cases with larger numbers of causes generate novel puzzles; (3) “neuron” and causal Bayes net diagrams are, as deployed in discussions of actual causation, almost always ambiguous; (4) actual causation is (intuitively) relative to an initial system state since state changes are relevant, but (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. R. G. Collingwood (1938). V.—On the So-Called Idea of Causation. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 38 (1):85-112.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. P. Coppock (1999). Supervenient Causation and Program Explanation: A Note on the Difference. Analysis 59 (4):346-354.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. David Danks, Singular Causation.
    In many people, caffeine causes slight muscle tremors, particularly in their hands. In general, the Caffeine → Muscle Tremors causal connection is a noisy one: someone can drink coffee and experience no hand shaking, and there are many other factors that can lead to muscle tremors. Now suppose that Jane drinks several cups of coffee and then notices that her hands are trembling; an obvious question is: did this instance of coffee drinking cause this instance of hand-trembling? Structurally similar questions (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Scott DeVito (1996). Completeness and Indeterministic Causation. Philosophy of Science 63 (3):184.
    In The Chances of Explanation, Paul Humphreys presents a metaphysical analysis of causation. In this paper, I argue that this analysis is flawed. Humphreys' model of Causality incorporates three completeness requirements. I show that these completeness requirements, when applied in the world, force us to take causally irrelevant factors to be causally relevant. On this basis, I argue that Humphreys' analysis should be rejected.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Scott Devito (1996). Towards an Epistemic Theory of Probabilistic Causality. Dissertation, The University of Rochester
    Within the last decade a new crop of theories of probabilistic causality has taken root. While these theories differ from each other in small ways, the basic principles underlying them are the same. These common principles form what I call the received view of probabilistic causality. ;In the first four chapters of the dissertation I examine and criticize the work of three proponents of the received view: Nancy Cartwright, Ellery Eells, and Paul Humphreys. Due to a number of epistemic and (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Edmond M. Dewan (1976). Consciousness as an Emergent Causal Agent in the Context of Control System Theory. In Gordon G. Globus, Grover Maxwell & I. Savodnik (eds.), Consciousness and the Brain. Plenum Press.
  38. Phil Dowe (2010). Proportionality and Omissions. Analysis 70 (3):446-451.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  39. Phil Dowe (2009). Absences, Possible Causation, and the Problem of Non-Locality. The Monist 92 (1):23-40.
    I argue that so-called ‘absence causation’must be treated in terms of counterfactuals about causation such as ‘had a occurred, a would have caused b’. First, I argue that some theories of causation that accept absence causation are unattractive because they undermine the idea of possible causation. And second, I argue that accepting absence causation violates a principle commonly associated with relativity.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  40. Curt John Ducasse (1969). Causation and the Types of Necessity. New York: Dover Publications.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  41. Antony Eagle (2007). Pragmatic Causation. In Huw Price & Richard Corry (eds.), Causation, Physics, and the Constitution of Reality: Russell's Republic Revisited. Oxford University Press.
    Russell famously argued that causation should be dispensed with. He gave two explicit arguments for this conclusion, both of which can be defused if we loosen the ties between causation and determinism. I show that we can define a concept of causation which meets Russell’s conditions but does not reduce to triviality. Unfortunately, a further serious problem is implicit beneath the details of Russell’s arguments, which I call the causal exclusion problem. Meeting this problem involves deploying a minimalist pragmatic account (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  42. Douglas Ehring (1989). Preemption and Probabilistic Counterfactual Theory. Philosophical Studies 56 (3):307 - 313.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Douglas Ehring (1987). Non-Simultaneous Causation. Analysis 47 (1):28 - 32.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Douglas Ehring (1985). Simultaneous Causation and Causal Chains. Analysis 45 (2):98 - 102.
    A standard objection to the thesis that all causation is simultaneous causation is that this claim rules out temporally extended causal chains. Defenders of universal simultaneous causation have suggested two replies: deny the supposed incompatibility between simultaneous causation and causal chains or deny the existence of causal chains. In this paper, I argue that neither type of defense of universal causation against this objection is plausible.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Douglas Ehring (1984). Probabilistic Causality and Preemption. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 35 (1):55-57.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  46. R. D. Ellis (1983). Agent Causation, Chance, and Determinism. Philosophical Inquiry 5 (1):29-42.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. Dorothy Emmet (1985). The Effectiveness of Causes. State University of New York Press.
    The Effectiveness of Causes presents a strong view of causation seen as an operation between participants in events, and not as a relation holding between events themselves. In it, Emmet proposes that other philosophical views of cause and effect provide only a world of events, each of which is presented as an unchanging unit. Such a world, she contends, is a “Zeno universe,” since transitions and movement are lost. Emmet offers a more complex interpretation of the various forms of causal (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Anne M. Fagot (1984). About Causation in Medicine: Some Shortcomings of a Probabilistic Account of Causal Explanations. In Lennart Nordenfelt & B. I. B. Lindahl (eds.), Health, Disease, and Causal Explanations in Medicine. Reidel. pp. 101--126.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  49. Jan Faye (1993). The Reality of the Future: An Essay on Time, Causation and Backward Causation. Erkenntnis 38 (2):273-279.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  50. Laura Felline (forthcoming). Mechanistic Causality and the Bottoming-Out Problem. In New Developments in Logic and Philosophy of Science.
    The so-called bottoming-out problem is considered one of the most serious problems in Stuart Glennan's mechanistic theory of causality. It is usually argued that such a problem cannot be overcome with the acknowledgement of the non-causal character of fundamental phenomena. According to such a widespread view, in the mechanistic account causation must go all the way down to the bottom level; a solution to the bottoming-out problem, therefore, requires an appeal to an ancillary account of causation that covers fundamental phenomena. (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 583