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  1. Diskursethik als Maximenethik: Von der Prinzipienbegründung zur Handlungsorientierung.Micha H. Werner - 2003 - Würzburg, Germany: Königshausen & Neumann.
    The book introduces a conception of discourse ethics, an intersubjectivist version of Kantian ethics. Analyzing contributions from Jürgen Habermas, Karl-Otto Apel, Wolfgang Kuhlmann, Albrecht Wellmer, Robert Alexy, Klaus Günther, Rainer Forst, Marcel Niquet and others, it reconstructs critical discussions on the justification of the principle of morality (part I) and on the various proposals on how to apply it (part II). It defends an alternative model of how discourse ethics can provide guidance under non-ideal circumstances and avoid both arbitrariness and (...)
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  2. God* Does Not Exist: A Novel Logical Problem of Evil.P. X. Monaghan - 2020 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 88 (2):181-195.
    I often tell my students that the only thing that is not controversial in philosophy is that everything else in it is controversial. While this might be a bit of an exaggeration, it does contain a kernel of truth, as many exaggerations do: philosophy is a highly contentious discipline. So it is remarkable the extent to which there is agreement in the philosophy of religion amongst theists, agnostics, and atheists alike that John Mackie’s argument for atheism is either invalid or (...)
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  3. How Deontologists Can Be Moderate.Christa M. Johnson - 2020 - Journal of Value Inquiry 54 (2):227-243.
    Moderate deontologists hold that while it is wrong to kill an innocent person to save, say, five other individuals, it is indeed morally permissible to kill one if, say, millions of lives are at stake. A basic worry concerning the moderate’s position is whether the view boils down to mere philosophical wishful thinking. In permitting agents to ever kill an innocent, moderates require that agents treat persons as means, in opposition to traditional deontological motivations. Recently Tyler Cook argued that deontologists (...)
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  4. Qadi `Abdul-Jabbar al-Mu`tazili's Moral Theory.Hossein Atrak - 2007 - Journal of Philosophical-Theological Reseach 9 (33):53-96.
    Abstract Qadi `Abdul-Jabbar, although has come to be Known as a Mu`tazili theologian, can be certainly mentioned as a moral philosopher by attention to his ethical views in the theological books. The paper is going to present his ethical opinions concerning normative ethics and Meta-ethics. It shows that `Abdul-Jabbar is a rationalist moral philosopher, who considers reason as the origin of moral obligations, and as the means of evaluating the rightness and wrongfulness of actions. Moreover, he is an essentialist, that (...)
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  5. Gerald Gaus, The Order of Public Reason: A Theory of Freedom and Morality in a Diverse and Bounded World , Pp. Xx + 621.Fabian Wendt - 2012 - Utilitas 24 (4):548-551.
  6. Recalcitrant Pluralism.Philip Stratton-Lake - 2011 - Ratio 24 (4):364-383.
    Here I argue that the best form of deontology is an ethic of prima facie duties, and that this form of deontology is especially resistant to any form of reduction to a single principle.
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  7. Recalcitrant Pluralism.Philip Stratton-Lake - 2011 - Ratio 24 (4):364-383.
    In this paper I argue that the best form of deontology is one understood in terms of prima facie duties. I outline how these duties are to be understood and show how they offer a plausible and elegant connection between the reason why we ought to do certain acts, the normative reasons we have to do these acts, the reason why moral agents will do them, and the reasons certain people have to resent someone who does not do them. I (...)
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  8. God's Command.John E. Hare - 2015 - Oxford University Press.
    This work is an exploration of divine command theory, which is the theory that what makes something morally obligatory is that God commands it.
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  9. Divine Command Ethics: An Argument in Favor of the Command Over the Will Formulation.Fred Richard Jensen - 2003 - Dissertation, University of California, Santa Barbara
    Since the 1970s, contemporary ethical theories metaphysically grounded in the activities of God have enjoyed a resurgence of philosophical interest. These so-called "divine command" theories can be divided into two major formulations: command and will. Today, most of the notable "divine command" ethicists embrace the will formulation in preference to the command formulation. ;In this work I will defend the command formulation from some important attacks and argue that the will formulation suffers from such a fundamental and, I believe, serious (...)
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  10. Command and the Neural Causation of Behavior.Randolf Didomenico - 1988 - Dissertation, University of Colorado at Boulder
    The concept of command is central to motor control theories and explanations for the initiation of behavior patterns. As currently conceived, command is a process of individual command neurons that receive sensory and other integrative information and trigger the expression of behavioral acts. I review the theory and methods used to show the existence of neurons mediating command function according to a major approach, which I call the Command Neuron Experiment . The CNE claims that command neurons are the cause (...)
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  11. Law as "Act of Reason" and "Command".Fulvio Di Blasi - 2006 - Nova Et Vetera 4:515-528.
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  12. Lost Command: "Benito Cereno" Reconsidered.George Knox - 1959 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 40 (3):280.
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  13. A Relational Moral Theory: African Ethics in and Beyond the Continent.Thaddeus Metz - forthcoming - Oxford University Press.
    _A Relational Moral Theory_ provides a new answer to the long-standing question of what all morally right actions might have in common as distinct from wrong ones, by drawing on neglected resources from the Global South and especially the African philosophical tradition. The book points out that the principles of utility and of respect for autonomy, the two rivals that have dominated western moral theory for about two centuries, share an individualist premise. Once that common assumption is replaced by a (...)
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  14. Sidgwick on Consequentialism and Deontology: A Critique.Thomas Hurka - 2014 - Utilitas 26 (2):129-152.
    In The Methods of Ethics Henry Sidgwick argued against deontology and for consequentialism. More specifically, he stated four conditions for self-evident moral truth and argued that, whereas no deontological principles satisfy all four conditions, the principles that generate consequentialism do. This article argues that both his critique of deontology and his defence of consequentialism fail, largely for the same reason: that he did not clearly grasp the concept W. D. Ross later introduced of a prima facie duty or duty other (...)
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  15. A Modified Divine Command Theory of Ethical Wrongness.Robert Merrihew Adams - 1997 - In Thomas L. Carson & Paul K. Moser (eds.), Morality and the Good Life. Oup Usa.
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  16. Justice, Contestability, and Conceptions of the Good.I. Barry'S. Argument - 1996 - Utilitas 8 (3).
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  17. Understanding Peace Within Contemporary Moral Theory.Court Lewis - 2013 - Philosophia 41 (4):1049-1068.
    In this essay, I continue Nicholas Wolterstorff’s work of developing a rights-based theory of ethics called eirenéism, which maintains the good life only occurs when justice—as a moral state of affairs where agents enjoy the goods to which they have a right—is achieved. As a result, justice is eirenē (the Greek word for peace). In the process of developing eirenéism I explain how eirenē differs from other conceptions of peace, and I offer several interpretive arguments for how best to understand (...)
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  18. Divine Command.John E. Hare - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Divine Command defends the thesis that what makes something morally obligatory is that God commands it, and what makes something morally forbidden is that God forbids it. John E. Hare successfully defends a version of divine command theory, but also shows that there is considerable overlap with some versions of natural law theory. Hare engages with a number of Christian theologians, most especially Karl Barth, and extends into a discussion of divine command within Judaism and Islam. The work concludes by (...)
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  19. Divine Command Theory.Philip L. Quinn - 2000 - In Hugh LaFollette - (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Ethical Theory. Blackwell. pp. 53--73.
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  20. The Concept of a Divine Command.Robert Merrihew Adams - 1996 - In D. Z. Phillips (ed.), Religion and Morality. St. Martin's Press. pp. 59--80.
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  21. Some Suggestions for Divine Command Theorists.William Alston - 1990 - In M. Beaty (ed.), Christian Theism and the Problems of Philosophy. University of Notre Dame Press. pp. 303--326.
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  22. Note on the Command Held by Seleukos, 323–321 B.C.Edwyn R. Bevan - 1900 - The Classical Review 14 (08):396-398.
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  23. African Conceptions of Human Dignity: Vitality and Community as the Ground of Human Rights.Thaddeus Metz - 2012 - Human Rights Review 13 (1):19-37.
    I seek to advance enquiry into the philosophical question of in virtue of what human beings have a dignity of the sort that grounds human rights. I first draw on values salient in sub-Saharan African moral thought to construct two theoretically promising conceptions of human dignity, one grounded on vitality, or liveliness, and the other on our communal nature. I then argue that the vitality conception cannot account for several human rights that we intuitively have, while the community conception can (...)
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  24. Are There Command Arguments?Gary A. Wedeking - 1970 - Analysis 30 (5):161 - 166.
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  25. There Are Command Sh-Inferences.Hector-Neri Castañeda - 1971 - Analysis 32 (1):13 - 19.
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  26. Utilitarianism and the Divine Command Theory.Edward Wierenga - 1984 - American Philosophical Quarterly 21 (4):311 - 318.
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  27. Divine Command Theories and the Appeal to Love.John Chandler - 1985 - American Philosophical Quarterly 22 (3):231 - 239.
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  28. What is Deontology?, Part One: Orthodox Viewsa Gerald F. Gaus.Gerald Gaus - unknown
    Current moral philosophy is often seen as essentially a debate between the two great traditions of consequentialism and deontology. Although there has been considerable work clarifying consequentialism, deontology is more often attacked or defended than analyzed. Just how we are to understand the very idea of a deontological ethic? We shall see that competing conceptions of deontology have been advanced in recent ethical thinking, leading to differences in classifying ethical theories. If we do not focus on implausible versions, the idea (...)
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  29. Daniel Kahneman, Ed Diener, and Norbert Schwarz , Well-Being: The Foundations of Hedonic Psychology , Pp. Xii + 593.Fred Feldman - 2006 - Utilitas 18 (2):192.
  30. Robert George , Natural Law, Liberalism, and Morality, Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1996, Pp. X + 311.T. M. Wilkinson - 1999 - Utilitas 11 (1):134.
  31. A Non-Proportional Hybrid Moral Theory.Tim Mulgan - 1997 - Utilitas 9 (3):291.
    A common objection to consequentialism is that it makes unreasonable demands upon moral agents, by failing to allow agents to give special weight to their own personal projects and interests. A prominent recent response to this objection is that of Samuel Scheffler, who seeks to make room for moral agents by building agent-centred prerogatives into a consequentialist moral theory. In this paper, I present a new objection to Scheffler's account. I then sketch an improved prerogative, which avoids this objection by (...)
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  32. Review of Robert Myers Self-Governance and Cooperation. [REVIEW]Skelton Anthony - 2002 - Utilitas 14 (1):128-130.
  33. Obligation and Rightness.W. D. Falk - 1945 - Philosophy 20 (76):129 - 147.
    Butler observes in the Preface to the Sermons that the subject of morals can be approached in two different ways: “One begins from enquiring into the abstract relations of things: the other from a matter of fact, namely what the particular nature of man is, its several parts, their economy or constitution; from whence it proceeds to determine what course of life it is, which is correspondent to his whole nature. In the former method the conclusion is expressed thus, that (...)
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  34. Scalar Properties, Binary Judgments.Larry Alexander - 2008 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (2):85–104.
    In the moral realm, our deontic judgments are usually (always?) binary. An act (or omission) is either morally forbidden or morally permissible. 1 Yet the determination of an act's deontic status frequently turns on the existence of properties that are matters of degree. In what follows I shall give several examples of binary moral judgments that turn on scalar properties, and I shall claim that these examples should puzzle us. How can the existence of a property to a specific degree (...)
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  35. Paul Rooney. Divine Command Morality. (Aldershot: Avebury, 1996.) Pp. 128. £32.50.B. A. - 1998 - Religious Studies 34 (2):231-234.
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  36. A Theory of Command Relations.Chris Barker & Geoffrey K. Pullum - 1990 - Linguistics and Philosophy 13 (1):1 - 34.
  37. Ross Harrison, Hobbes, Locke, and Confusion's Masterpiece (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003), Pp. 281.Deborah Baumgold - 2005 - Utilitas 17 (3):348-349.
  38. Obligation and Moral Worth: Reflections on Prichard and Kant.Norman O. Dahl - 1986 - Philosophical Studies 50 (3):369 - 399.
  39. Reconsidering Mo Tzu on the Foundations of Morality.Kristopher Duda - 2001 - Asian Philosophy 11 (1):23 – 31.
    Dennis Ahern and David Soles raise substantial problems for the conventional interpretation of Mo Tzu as a utilitarian. Although they defend different interpretations, both scholars agree that Mo Tzu is committed to a divine command theory in some form, citing the same key passages where, supposedly, Mo Tzu explicitly endorses the divine command theory. In this paper, I defend the orthodox interpretation, insisting that Mo Tzu is a utilitarian. I show that the passages cited by Ahern and Soles do not (...)
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  40. Categorical Consistency in Ethics.Alan Gewirth - 1967 - Philosophical Quarterly 17 (69):289-299.
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  41. Two Sets of Concerns About Heath’s Pragmatic Theory of Convergence.Pablo Gilabert - 2005 - Dialogue 44 (2):383-390.
  42. The Recent Revival of Divine Command Ethics.Philip L. Quinn - 1990 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50:345-365.
  43. The Non-Identity Fallacy: Harm, Probability and Another Look at Parfit’s Depletion Example.Melinda A. Roberts - 2007 - Utilitas 19 (3):267-311.
    The non-identity problem is really a collection of problems having distinct logical features. For that reason, non-identity problems can be typed. This article focuses on just one type of non-identity problem, the problem, which includes Derek Parfit's depletion example and many others. The can't-expect-better problem uses an assessment about the low probability of any particular person's coming into existence to reason that an earlier wrong act does not harm that person. This article argues that that line of reasoning is unusually (...)
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  44. Values and the Heart's Command.Bas C. Van Fraassen - 1973 - Journal of Philosophy 70 (1):5-19.
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Divine Command Theories
  1. The Foundation of Morality in Theory and Practice (1726).John Clarke - unknown
  2. The Tension Between Divine Command Theory and Utilitarianism in Mozi and George Berkeley: A Comparison.Michael Hemmingsen - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (3):740-756.
    Mozi and George Berkeley are philosophers who are not often put into conversation. However, I argue that comparing them can shed some light on the relationship between certain philosophical positions and their resulting moral philosophies. Specifically, I will draw attention to the way that their lack of interest in an appearance-reality distinction and in "essence" gives rise to a tension between consequentialism and divine command theory. These similarities exist despite the fact that Mozi and Berkeley otherwise have quite distinct views. (...)
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  3. Fortifying the Petard.Adam Lloyd Johnson - 2018 - Philosophia Christi 20 (2):357-363.
    Erik Wielenberg argued that William Lane Craig’s attack against nontheistic ethical models is detrimental to Craig’s Divine Command Theory as follows: Craig claims it is unacceptable for ethical models to include logically necessary connections without providing an explanation of why such connections hold. Yet Craig posits certain logically necessary connections without providing an explanation of them. Wielenberg concluded that “Craig is hoisted by his own petard.” In this paper I respond to Wielenberg’s criticism by clarifying, and elaborating on, the DCT. (...)
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  4. What If God Commanded Something Horrible? A Pragmatics-Based Defence of Divine Command Metaethics.Philipp Kremers - forthcoming - Religious Studies:1-21.
    The objection of horrible commands claims that divine command metaethics is doomed to failure because it is committed to the extremely counterintuitive assumption that torture of innocents, rape, and murder would be morally obligatory if God commanded these acts. Morriston, Wielenberg, and Sinnott-Armstrong have argued that formulating this objection in terms of counterpossibles is particularly forceful because it cannot be simply evaded by insisting on God’s necessary perfect moral goodness. I show that divine command metaethics can be defended even against (...)
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  5. The Prior Obligations Objection to Theological Stateism.Frederick Choo - 2019 - Faith and Philosophy 36 (3):372-384.
    Theological stateist theories, the most well-known of which is Divine Command Theory (DCT), ground our moral obligations directly in some state of God. The prior obligations objection poses a challenge to theological stateism. Is there a moral obligation to obey God’s commands? If no, it is hard to see how God’s commands can generate any moral obligations for us. If yes, then what grounds this prior obligation? To avoid circularity, the moral obligation must be grounded independent of God’s commands; and (...)
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  6. What Should Theists Say About Constructivist Positions in Metaethics?Christian Miller - 2018 - In Kevin Jung (ed.), Religious Ethics and Constructivism: A Metaethical Inquiry. New York: Routledge. pp. 82-103.
    Constructivist positions in meta-ethics are on the rise in recent years. Similarly, there has been a flurry of activity amongst theistic philosophers examining the relationship between God and normative facts. But so far as I am aware, these two literatures have almost never intersected with each other. Constructivists have said very little about God, and theists working on religious ethics have said very little about constructivist views in meta-ethics. In this paper, I draw some connections between the two literatures, and (...)
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