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  1. An " Instrumentalism to Realism " Hypothesis.Dr Afsar Abbas - manuscript
    It is proposed here that all successful and complete theories always proceed through an intermediate stage of instrumentalism to the final stage of realism. Examples from history of science ( both classical and modern ) in support of this hypothesis are presented.
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  2. Representations and Scientific Realism.Evandro Agazzi - forthcoming - Epistemologia.
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  3. Science, Epistemological Relativism and Truth: Some Comments on Roy Bhaskar's Transcendental Realism.C. Allan - 1998 - South African Journal of Philosophy 17 (1):37-49.
    This paper sets out to assess the internal coherence of Roy Bhaskar's transcendental realist account of science. Whilst fully supporting his transcendental derivation of a stratified ontology of structures and generative mechanisms from the scientific practice of experimentation, I argue that Bhaskar's adoption of the stance of epistemic relativism results in his inability to defend the generalizability of this ontology. My argument against his epistemic stance turns on the fact that it rests on a false dichotomy between epistemic relativism and (...)
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  4. Peircean Scientific Realism.Robert Almeder - 1989 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 6 (4):357 - 364.
  5. Realism Versus Relativism in Ethics.John Anderson - 1933 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 11 (1):1 – 11.
    This article analyzes the central weaknesses of both relativism and traditional empiricism as overarching accounts of science appropriate for psychology. A third approach, a variant of scientific realism, is described and discussed, and it is argued that this approach avoids the most pernicious features of both relativism and empiricism. This version of scientific realism postulates that the rational structure of science is composed of four interlocked categories: aims, epistemic values, methodological rules, and theories. These categories are described, and the nature (...)
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  6. Review of Frederick Suppe: The Semantic Conception of Theories and Scientific Realism. [REVIEW]Gunnar Andersson - 1990 - Theoria 56 (1/2):117.
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  7. Building Ontologies with Basic Formal Ontology.Robert Arp, Andrew D. Spear & Barry Smith - 2015 - Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
    In the era of “big data,” science is increasingly information driven, and the potential for computers to store, manage, and integrate massive amounts of data has given rise to such new disciplinary fields as biomedical informatics. Applied ontology offers a strategy for the organization of scientific information in computer-tractable form, drawing on concepts not only from computer and information science but also from linguistics, logic, and philosophy. This book provides an introduction to the field of applied ontology that is of (...)
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  8. Going Local: A Defense of Methodological Localism About Scientific Realism.Jamin Asay - forthcoming - Synthese:1-23.
    Scientific realism and anti-realism are most frequently discussed as global theses: theses that apply equally well across the board to all the various sciences. Against this status quo I defend the localist alternative, a methodological stance on scientific realism that approaches debates on realism at the level of individual sciences, rather than at science itself. After identifying the localist view, I provide a number of arguments in its defense, drawing on the diversity and disunity found in the sciences, as well (...)
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  9. Instrumental Realism: The Interface Between Philosophy of Science and Philosophy of TechnologyDon Ihde.Davis Baird - 1992 - Isis 83 (3):529-530.
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  10. Matters of Interest: The Objects of Research in Science and Technoscience. [REVIEW]Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent, Sacha Loeve, Alfred Nordmann & Astrid Schwarz - 2011 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 42 (2):365-383.
    This discussion paper proposes that a meaningful distinction between science and technoscience can be found at the level of the objects of research. Both notions intermingle in the attitudes, intentions, programs and projects of researchers and research institutions—that is, on the side of the subjects of research. But the difference between science and technoscience becomes more explicit when research results are presented in particular settings and when the objects of research are exhibited for the specific interest they hold. When an (...)
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  11. Scientific Realism and Human Emancipation.Roy Bhaskar - 1986
    Following on from Roy Bhaskar’s first two books, A Realist Theory of Science and The Possibility of Naturalism, Scientific Realism and Human Emancipation, establishes the conception of social science as explanatory—and thence emancipatory—critique. _Scientific Realism and Human Emancipation_ starts from an assessment of the impasse of contemporary accounts of science as stemming from an incomplete critique of positivism. It then proceeds to a systematic exposition of scientific realism in the form of transcendental realism, highlighting a conception of science as explanatory (...)
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  12. A Realist Theory of Science.Roy Bhaskar - 1978 - Routledge.
    In this book, Roy Bhaskar sets out to revindicate ontology, critiquing the reduction of being in favor of knowledge, which he calls the "epistemic fallacy".
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  13. Forms of Realism.Roy Bhaskar - 1975 - Philosophica 15.
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  14. Science and Necessity.John Bigelow & Robert Pargetter - 1990 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book espouses an innovative theory of scientific realism in which due weight is given to mathematics and logic. The authors argue that mathematics can be understood realistically if it is seen to be the study of universals, of properties and relations, of patterns and structures, the kinds of things which can be in several places at once. Taking this kind of scientific platonism as their point of departure, they show how the theory of universals can account for probability, laws (...)
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  15. Scientific and Theological Realism.Alexander Bird - 2007 - In A. Moore & M. Scott (eds.), Realism and Religion. Ashgate. pp. 61-81.
  16. Realism, Anti-Foundationalism and the Enthusiasm for Natural Kinds.Richard Boyd - 1991 - Philosophical Studies 61 (1-2):127-48.
  17. Scientific Realism and Naturalistic Epistemology.Richard Boyd - 1980 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1980:613-662.
    A realistic and dialectical conception of the epistemology of science is advanced according to which the acquisition of instrumental knowledge is parasitic upon the acquisition, by successive approximation, of theoretical knowledge. This conception is extended to provide an epistemological characterization of reference and of natural kinds, and it is integrated into recent naturalistic treatments of knowledge. Implications for several current issues in the philosophy of science are explored.
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  18. Is Scientific Realism a Contingent Thesis?Michael Bradie - 1972 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1972:367 - 373.
  19. Models and Scientific Realism.Michael Peter Bradie - 1970 - Dissertation, University of Hawai'i
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  20. Cherniak on Scientific Realism.Harold I. Brown - 1990 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 41 (3):415-427.
    In the final chapter of Minimal Rationality Christopher Cherniak offers three arguments to show that an agent with finite cognitive resources is not capable of arriving at a true and complete theory of the universe. I discuss each of these arguments and show that Cherniak has not succeeded in making his antirealist case.
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  21. Scientific Realism and the Plasticity of Mind.James Robert Brown - 1983 - International Philosophical Quarterly 23 (2):226-227.
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  22. Scientific Abstraction and the Realist Impulse.Martin Bunzl - 1994 - Philosophy of Science 61 (3):449-456.
    In a series of important papers, A. Fine has developed and defended the view that the proper reading of scientific practice is neither realist nor antirealist. Instead, he argues that realism and antirealism both add something extra to a core position which is neither. In this discussion I reexamine his claim in the light of some criticisms. Fine's position contains an important insight, but to draw that point out requires shifting the way in which Fine poses the argument. I do (...)
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  23. Realismus in Duhems Naturgemässer Klassifikation.Alex Burri - 1996 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 27 (2):203 - 213.
    Realism in Duhem's Natural Classification. Pierre Duhem is an outstanding exponent of empiricism. According to the empiricist view scientific laws and theories merely describe formal relations between observable phenomena. Duhems' important notion of natural classification is intended to explain the predictive success of science. I shall argue that it can only be interpreted realistically. Besides the success of science, two further arguments are put forward in favor of realism: (i) the fact that laws of nature are necessary, and (ii) the (...)
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  24. Realismus in Duhems Naturgemässer klassifikationRealism in Duhem's Natural Classification.Alex Burri - 1996 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 27 (2):203-213.
    Realism in Duhem's Natural Classification. Pierre Duhem is an outstanding exponent of empiricism. According to the empiricist view scientific laws and theories merely describe formal relations between observable phenomena. Duhems' important notion of natural classification is intended to explain the predictive success of science. I shall argue that it can only be interpreted realistically. Besides the success of science, two further arguments are put forward in favor of realism: the fact that laws of nature are necessary, and the extension of (...)
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  25. Review of Sidney Hook, The Metaphysics of Pragmatism. [REVIEW]H. G. Callaway - 1997 - Transactions of the C.S. Peirce Society 33 (No. 3):799-808.
    This work first appeared as Sidney Hook's dissertation, afterward quickly published by Open Court in 1927, the same year Hook began his long career at New York University. Heretofore difficult to find, it now appears as a handsome and timely reprint, carrying John Dewey's original "Introductory Word," and providing opportunity to look back at the pragmatist tradition and the controversial role of metaphysics in it.
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  26. "Scientific Realism" is Said in Many Ways, at Least in 1111: An Elucidation of the Term "Scientific Realism".Christián Carlos Carman - 2005 - Scientiae Studia 3 (1):43-64.
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  27. Science and Necessity. [REVIEW]John W. Carroll - 1992 - Isis 83 (4):704-705.
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  28. The Many Problems of Realism (Studies in the General Philosophy of Science: Volume 3).P. Cartois (ed.) - 1995 - Tilberg University Press.
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  29. Getting Real with Quanta.Anjan Chakravartty - unknown
    The interpretation of quantum mechanics has always been a pain in the backside of scientific realism. Throughout its history, various anti-realist doctrines have dominated, associated with such luminaries as Niels Bohr and Werner Heisenberg, and referred to collectively as ‘the Copenhagen interpretation’. The voice of realist dissent was thus marginalized, but never silenced. In recent years, renewed interest has attached to the possibility of a realist interpretation of quantum theory. Christopher Norris’ book is an effort in this tradition.
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  30. Scientific Realism.Anjan Chakravartty - 2013 - The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  31. Causal Realism: Events and Processes.Anjan Chakravartty - 2005 - Erkenntnis 63 (1):7-31.
    Minimally, causal realism (as understood here) is the view that accounts of causation in terms of mere, regular or probabilistic conjunction are unsatisfactory, and that causal phenomena are correctly associated with some form of de re necessity. Classic arguments, however, some of which date back to Sextus Empiricus and have appeared many times since, including famously in Russell, suggest that the very notion of causal realism is incoherent. In this paper I argue that if such objections seem compelling, it is (...)
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  32. Critical Scientific Realism.Anjan Chakravartty - 2004 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 69 (1):227-229.
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  33. Review of The Reality of the Unobservable. [REVIEW]Anjan Chakravartty - 2003 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54.
    There is perhaps no more succinct a way of describing the controversy between scientific realists and antirealists than to say that it turns on the reality of the unobservable. Less concisely, it turns on whether we have reason to think that scientific theories tell us the truth (or something close to it) about some of the underlying, unobservable bits of a mind-independent, external reality, among other things. Claims to knowledge of such a reality have traditionally been a bone of contention (...)
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  34. The Semantic or Model-Theoretic View of Theories and Scientific Realism.Anjan Chakravartty - 2001 - Synthese 127 (3):325 - 345.
    The semantic view of theoriesis one according to which theoriesare construed as models of their linguisticformulations. The implications of thisview for scientific realism have been little discussed. Contraryto the suggestion of various champions of the semantic view,it is argued that this approach does not makesupport for a plausible scientific realism anyless problematic than it might otherwise be.Though a degree of independence of theory fromlanguage may ensure safety frompitfalls associated with logical empiricism, realism cannot be entertained unless models or (abstractedand/or idealized) (...)
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  35. Steve Clarke, Metaphysics and the Disunity of Scientific Knowledge. [REVIEW]A. Chalmers - 1999 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (3):381.
  36. Is Bhaskar's Realism Realistic.Alan Chalmers - 1988 - Radical Philosophy 49:18-23.
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  37. Preservative Realism and its Discontents: Revisiting Caloric.Hasok Chang - 2003 - Philosophy of Science 70 (5):902-912.
    A popular and plausible response against Laudan's “pessimistic induction” has been what I call “preservative realism,” which argues that there have actually been enough elements of scientific knowledge preserved through major theory‐change processes, and that those elements can be accepted realistically. This paper argues against preservative realism, in particular through a critical review of Psillos's argument concerning the case of the caloric theory of heat. Contrary to his argument, the historical record of the caloric theory reveals that beliefs about the (...)
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  38. How to Take Realism Beyond Foot-Stamping.Hasok Chang - 2001 - Philosophy 76 (1):5-30.
    I propose a reformulation of realism, as the pursuit of ontological plausibility in our systems of knowledge. This is dubbed plausibility realism, for convenience of reference. Plausibility realism is non-empiricist, in the sense that it uses ontological plausibility as an independent criterion from empirical adequacy in evaluating systems of knowledge. Ontological plausibility is conceived as a precondition for intelligibility, nor for Truth; therefore, the function of plausibilty realism is to facilitate the kind of understanding that is not reducible to mere (...)
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  39. Aristotle and Modern Realism.David Charles - 1995 - In Robert Heinaman (ed.), Aristotle and Moral Realism. Westview Press. pp. 135--172.
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  40. Discussions Quinton's Neglected Argument for Scientific Realism.Silvio Seno Chibeni - 2005 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 36 (2):393-400.
    This paper discusses an argument for scientific realism put forward by Anthony Quinton in The Nature of Things. The argument – here called the controlled continuity argument – seems to have received no attention in the literature, apparently because it may easily be mistaken for a better-known argument, Grover Maxwell’s “argument from the continuum”. It is argued here that, in point of fact, the two are quite distinct and that Quinton’s argument has several advantages over Maxwell’s. The controlled continuity argument (...)
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  41. Anjan Chakravartty * A Metaphysics for Scientific Realism: Knowing the Unobservable.S. Choi - 2011 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 62 (2):443-451.
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  42. Transcendental Realisms in the Philosophy of Science: On Bhaskar and Cartwright.Stephen Clarke - 2010 - Synthese 173 (3):299-315.
    I consider two transcendental arguments for realism in the philosophy of science, which are due to Roy Bhaskar (A realist theory of science, 1975) and Nancy Cartwright (The dappled world, 1999). Bhaskar and Cartwright are both influential figures, however there is little discussion of their use of transcendental arguments in the literature. Here I seek to correct this oversight. I begin by describing the role of the transcendental arguments in question, in the context of the broader philosophical theories in which (...)
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  43. Critical Realism.Andrew Collier - 1990 - International Studies in Philosophy 20 (2):120-122.
    A review article on two books by Roy Bhaskar: Reclaiming Reality: A Critical Introduction to Contemporary Philosophy (London: Verso, 1989), & The Possibility of Naturalism: A Philosophical Critique of the Human Sciences (2nd Edition, Harvester Wheatsheaf: London, 1989 see listings in IRPS No. 56). Bhaskar portrays critical realism as insisting on "the primacy of being over knowledge" & argues for the emancipatory consequences of this position. His philosophy distinguishes between intransitive & transitive domains & between open & closed systems, & (...)
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  44. Abstraction and Moderate Realism.F. G. Connolly - 1953 - New Scholasticism 27 (1):72-90.
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  45. Sellarsian Scientific Realism Without Sensa.James W. Cornman - 1978 - In Joseph Pitt (ed.), The Philosophy of Wilfrid Sellars: Queries and Extensions. D. Reidel. pp. 57--71.
  46. SMART, J. J. C. - "Philosophy and Scientific Realism". [REVIEW]S. Coval - 1967 - Mind 76:450.
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  47. Taking Theories Seriously.Richard Creath - 1985 - Synthese 62 (3):317 - 345.
    This paper defends scientific realism, the doctrine that we should interpret theories as being just as ontologically committing as beliefs at the observational level. I examine the character of observation to show that the difference in interpretation suggested by anti-realists is unwarranted. Second, I discuss Wilfrid Sellars'' approach to the issue. Finally, I provide a detailed study of recent work by Bas van Fraassen. While van Fraassen''s work is the focus of the paper, the conclusions are far broader: That a (...)
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  48. Critical Realism and Critical Philosophy.Justin Cruickshank - 2007 - Journal of Critical Realism 1 (1):49-66.
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  49. Critical Realism: The Difference in Makes.Justin Cruickshank (ed.) - 2003 - Routledge.
    This book introduces social scientists to the difference that critical realism can make to theorizing and methodological problems within the contemporary social sciences. The chapters, which cover such topics as cultural studies, feminism, globalization, heterodox economics, education policy, the self, and the "underclass" debate, are arranged in four sections dealing with some of the major topics in contemporary social science: ethics, the consequences of the "linguistic turn", methodology and globalization.
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  50. Influences, Histories, and Reality.Bernard D'Espagnat - 1996 - Foundations of Physics 26 (7):919-928.
    It is stressed that any theory of which it is claimed that it is compatible both with standard realism and with the experimental data is subject to severe constraints. One is that it must either incorporate superluminal influences or negate the free will of the experimentalist. The other one is that, in it. it is only at the price of accepting “backward causality” that a measurement can he interpreted as revealing the value the measured quantity had, just before, rather than (...)
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