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  1. Verbos Que Se Comportan Como Antecedentes Pronominales.Juan J. Acero - 1984 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 14 (3-4):309-321.
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  2. Verbos que se comportan como antecedentes pronominales.Rafael Acero - 1984 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 14 (3/4):309.
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  3. From Ergative Case Marking to Semantic Case Marking.Gontzal Aldai - 2008 - In Mark Donohue & Søren Wichmann (eds.), The Typology of Semantic Alignment. Oxford University Press.
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  4. On Verb-Initial and Verb-Final Word Orders in Lokaa.Mark Baker - manuscript
    Verb phrases seems to be head initial in affirmative sentences in Lokaa (a Niger-Congo language of the Cross River area of Nigeria) but head final in negative clauses and gerunds. This article aspires to give a comprehensive description of this phenomenon, together with a theoretical analysis. It considers how a full range of grammatical elements are ordered in both kinds of clauses—including direct objects, second objects, particles, weak pronouns, complement clauses, serial verbs, adverbs, prepositional phrases, tense/mood particles, and auxiliary verbs. (...)
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  5. The Non-Unity of VP-Preposing.Mark Baltin - unknown
    This paper shows that a VP in English is only a VP at the outset of a derivation, and that VP-preposing in English is in fact preposing of the internal arguments of the verb, followed by remnant movement of the original VP. Therefore, English looks much more like German (Muller (1998)), than it appears at first glance The evidence for the non-constituency of the verb and its original arguments in preposed position comes from its solution to what has been termed (...)
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  6. Semantics for Clausally Complemented Verbs.Daniel Bonevac - 1984 - Synthese 59 (2):187 - 218.
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  7. The Verb "to Be" in Greek Philosophy.Lesley Brown - 1994 - In Stephen Everson (ed.), Language. Cambridge University Press.
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  8. The Ideality of Verbal Expressions.Dorion Cairns - 1940 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 1 (4):453-462.
    These components are distinguishable in verbal expressing: (1) the judging act, (2) the sense expressed by (3) the verbal expression, Which is embodied in (4) sounds/marks, And (5) the thing(s) which the expression is about. The essay focuses on verbal expressions showing that they are ideal individuals: they remain identifiably the same through variations in their embodiments. While real individuals "exemplify" universals, Verbal expressions are "embodied" by real sounds or marks. Expressions, Like melodies or folk dances, Combine ideality with mutability (...)
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  9. The Logic of Intentional Verbs.David Carr - 1984 - Philosophical Investigations 7 (2):141-157.
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  10. The Parenthetical Use of the Verb 'Believe'.M. J. Charlesworth - 1965 - Mind 74 (295):415-420.
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  11. Psychological Verbs and Referential Attitudes.Lauchlan Chipman - 1981 - Philosophical Quarterly 31 (125):289-301.
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  12. Intentional ``Transitive'' Verbs and Concealed Complement Clauses.Marcel den Dikken, Richard Larson & Peter Ludlow - 1996 - Revista De Linguistica 8.
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  13. Names, Verbs and Quantification Again.Nicholas Denyer - 1999 - Philosophy 74 (3):439-440.
    There are enormous differences between quantifying name-variables only, quantifying verb-variables only, and quantifying both. These differences are found only in the logic of polyadic predication; and this presumably is why Richard Gaskin thinks that they distinguish names from transitive verbs only, and not from verbs generally. But that thought is mistaken: these differences also distinguish names from intransitive verbs. They thus vindicate the common idea that on the difference between names and verbs we may base grandiose metaphysical distinctions, and undermine (...)
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  14. Names, Verbs and Sentences.Nicholas Denyer - 1998 - Philosophy 73 (4):619-623.
    Metaphysicians often declare that there are large ontological differences (properties versus individuals, universals versus particulars) correlated with the linguistic distinction between names and verbs. Gaskin argues against all such declarations on the grounds that we may quantify with equal ease over the referents of both types of expression. However, his argument must be wrong, given the massive differences between first- and second-order qualification. Its only grain of truth is that these differences show up only in the logic of relations, and (...)
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  15. Used Forms of Latin Incohative Verbs.O. A. W. Dilke - 1967 - Classical Quarterly 17 (02):400-.
    The grammarian Caesellius Vindex, writing under Trajan, criticized Furius Antias for his newly coined verbs lutescere, noctescere, opulescere and vīrescere. Their meanings in classical Latin are classified by Nicolaie as follows: becoming, the intensification of a quality, the acquisition of a quality. Their number increases in post-classical Latin, in which we also find them used causatively as transitive verbs, e.g. innotescere ‘make known’; Gellius' causative use of inolesco is mentioned below. Incohative verbs descend to Romance languages, where forms in -o (...)
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  16. Familiar Verbs Are Not Always Easier Than Novel Verbs: How German Pre‐School Children Comprehend Active and Passive Sentences.Miriam Dittmar, Kirsten Abbot‐Smith, Elena Lieven & Michael Tomasello - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (1):128-151.
    Many studies show a developmental advantage for transitive sentences with familiar verbs over those with novel verbs. It might be that once familiar verbs become entrenched in particular constructions, they would be more difficult to understand (than would novel verbs) in non-prototypical constructions. We provide support for this hypothesis investigating German children using a forced-choice pointing paradigm with reversed agent-patient roles. We tested active transitive verbs in study 1. The 2-year olds were better with familiar than novel verbs, while the (...)
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  17. Toward a Semantic Analysis of Verb Aspect and the English 'Imperfective' Progressive.David R. Dowty - 1977 - Linguistics and Philosophy 1 (1):45 - 77.
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  18. On the Surface Verb Q'ay'ai| Qela.Emmon Bach - 2002 - Linguistics and Philosophy 25 (5):531-544.
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  19. The Persistence of the Attitudes.Jerry A. Fodor - 1993 - In Scott M. Christensen & Dale R. Turner (eds.), Folk Psychology and the Philosophy of Mind. L. Erlbaum. pp. 221--246.
  20. Only, Emotive Factive Verbs, and the Dual Nature of Polarity Dependency.Anastasia Giannakidou - manuscript
    The main focus of this article is the occurrence of some polarity items (PIs) in the complements of emotive factive verbs and only. This fact has been taken as a challenge to the semantic approach to PIs (Linebarger 1980), because only and factive verbs are not downward entailing (DE). A modification of the classical DE account is proposed by introducing the notion of nonveridicality (Zwarts 1995, Giannakidou 1998, 1999, 2001) as the one crucial for PI sanctioning. To motivate this move, (...)
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  21. Verbs, Nouns and Affixation∗∗∗.Jane Grimshaw - unknown
    What explains the rich patterns of deverbal nominalization? Why do some nouns have argument structure, while others do not? We seek a solution in which properties of deverbal nouns are composed from properties of verbs, properties of nouns, and properties of the morphemes that relate them. The theory of each plus the theory of how they combine, should give the explanation. In exploring this, we investigate properties of two theories of nominalization. In one, the verb-like properties of deverbal nouns result (...)
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  22. State Event Logic.Gerd Grosse & Hesham Khalil - 1996 - Logic Journal of the IGPL 4 (1):47-74.
    In this article we give a detailed presentation of state event logic which is a modal logic for reasoning about concurrent events and causality between events [8] State event logic differs from previous approaches in the following directions: First, events enjoy the same attention as states. In the same way as states can be viewed as models of the formulae describing the facts that hold in them we think of events as models of the formulae describing the subevents. Second, instead (...)
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  23. Bound VPs That Need to Be.Isabelle Haik - 1987 - Linguistics and Philosophy 10 (4):503 - 530.
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  24. The Myth of Factive Verbs.Allan Hazlett - 2010 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 80 (3):497 - 522.
  25. ``Different Constructions in Terms of the Basic Epistemological Verbs: A Survey of Some Problems and Proposals&Quot.Jaakko Hintikka - 1975 - In The Intensions of Intentionality and Other New Models for Modalities. Dordrecht: D. Reidel. pp. 1--25.
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  26. Pluractionality with Lexically Cumulative Verbs.Gianina Iordăchioaia & Elena Soare - 2015 - Natural Language Semantics 23 (4):307-352.
    We offer a syntax–semantics interface for a previously undiscussed type of event-external pluractional operator. While earlier literature discusses overt cases of such operators that act as derivational affixes and attach at the V-level, we here report evidence for a covert operator, which behaves like an inflectional affix at the level of Aspect. This analysis enriches our understanding of pluractional operators as markers of verbal plurality in languages where verbs are lexically cumulative and pluractionality as accounted for previously would appear to (...)
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  27. Embedded Verb Second in Infinitival Clauses.Kyle Johnson - manuscript
    Icelandic is the only Scandinavian language in which the verb always moves past negation, and other sentence adverbials, in embedded clauses. We follow everyone else and take this as evidence that Icelandic as opposed to the other Scandinavian languages has V°-to-I°1 movement (see, e.g., Kosmeijer 1986, Holmberg & Platzack 1990:101, Rohrbacher 1994:30-69, and Vikner 1994:118-127, 1995:ch.5). If we assume that negation and sentence adverbials mark the left edge of VP (they could be adjoined to VP or to TP, for example), (...)
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  28. Latin Denominative Verbs Xavier Mignot: Les verbes dénominatifs latins. (Études et Commentaires, lxxi.) Pp. 417. Paris: Klincksieck, 1969. Paper, 60 fr. [REVIEW]D. M. Jones - 1973 - The Classical Review 23 (02):220-222.
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  29. Remarks on Denominal Verbs.Paul Kiparsky - manuscript
    Word meaning confronts us, as acutely as anything in syntax, with what Chomsky has called Plato’s problem.1 We know far more about the meaning of almost any word than we could have learned just from our exposure to uses of it. Communication would be unbearably laborious if we did not share with other speakers the ability to generalize the meanings of words in the right ways. As Fodor (1981) notes in arguing for the innateness of lexical semantics, the most we (...)
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  30. On the Plurality of Verbs.Angelika Kratzer - unknown
    This paper pursues some of the consequences of the idea that there are (at least) two sources for distributive/cumulative interpretations in English. One source is lexical pluralization: All predicative stems are born as plurals, as Manfred Krifka and Fred Landman have argued. Lexical pluralization should be available in any language and should not depend on the particular make-up of its DPs. I suggest that the other source of cumulative/distributive interpretations in English is directly provided by plural DPs. DPs with plural (...)
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  31. Phase Theory and Prosodic Spellout: The Case of Verbs.Angelika Kratzer - unknown
    In this article we will explore the consequences of adopting recent proposals by Chomsky, according to which the syntactic derivation proceeds in terms of phases. The notion of phase – through the associated notion of spellout – allows for an insightful theory of the fact that syntactic constituents receive default phrase stress not across the board, but as a function of yet-to-be-explicated conditions on their syntactic context. We will see that the phonological evi- dence requires us to modify somewhat the (...)
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  32. Manner in Dative Alternation.Manfred Krifka - manuscript
    There are a number of well-known restrictions for the Dative Alternation (cf. Green (1974), Oehrle (1976), Gropen, Pinker, Hollander, & Goldberg (1989), Pinker (1989), Pesetsky (1992), Levin (1993). I will show that several of the low-level semantic restrictions are consequences of a more general one involving the incorporation of a manner component into the meaning of the verb. These restrictions can be explained by assuming two distinct representations of verbs participating in the Dative Alternation: The PO frame expresses movement of (...)
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  33. A Logical Study of Verbs.Susanne K. Langer - 1927 - Journal of Philosophy 24 (5):120-129.
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  34. Latin Deponent Verbs.E. Laughton - 1979 - The Classical Review 29 (01):90-.
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  35. Verbs and Diachronic Syntax: A Comparative History of English and French (Review).David Lightfoot - 1994 - In Stephen Everson (ed.), Language. Cambridge University Press. pp. 70--3.
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  36. Between de Dicto and de Re: De Objecto Attitudes.Tero Tulenheimo Manuel Rebuschi - 2011 - Philosophical Quarterly 61 (245):828-838.
    Hintikka's second generation epistemic logic introduces a syntactic device allowing to express independence relations between certain logical constants. De re knowledge attributions can be reformulated in terms of quantifier independence, but the reformulation does not extend to non‐factive attitudes like belief. There, formulae with independent quantifiers serve to express a new type of attitude, intermediate between de dicto and de re, called ‘de objecto’: in each possible world compatible with the agent's belief, there is an individual with the specified property (...)
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  37. The Construction of Verbs of Thinking: A Reminder.E. C. Marchant - 1929 - The Classical Review 43 (04):120-.
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  38. Infinitive Verbs and Tensed Statements.Bernard Mayo - 1963 - Philosophical Quarterly 13 (53):289-297.
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  39. The Irregular Verb: To Teach.Louis V. Molinari, Ethel F. Brannan & Robert C. Blough (eds.) - 1972 - Dubuque, Iowa, Kendall/Hunt Pub. Co..
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  40. On the Distinction Between Abstract States, Concrete States, and Tropes.Friederike Moltmann - 2013 - In Claire Beyssade, Mari Alda & Del Prete Fabio (eds.), Genericity. Oxford University Press. pp. 292-311.
    This paper defends a distinction between ‘abstract states’ and ‘concrete states’, following Maienborn (2005, 2007) in her account of the peculiar semantic behavior of stative verbs. The paper proposes an ontological account of the notion of an abstract state and discusses how it relates to the notion of a trope or particularized property, which has so far been neglected in the semantic literature on stative verbs.
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  41. Parts and Wholes in Semantics (TOC).Friederike Moltmann - 1997 - Oxford University Press.
    This book present a unified semantic theory of expressions involving the notions of part and whole. It develops a theory of part structures which differs from traditional (extensional) mereological theories in that the notion of an integrated whole plays a central role and in that the part structure of an entity is allowed to vary across different situations, perspectives, and dimensions. The book presents a great range of empirical generalizations involving plurals, mass nouns, adnominal and adverbial modifiers such as 'whole', (...)
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  42. On Negativing Greek Participles, Where the Leading Verbs Are of a Type to Require Μή.A. C. Moorhouse - 1948 - Classical Quarterly 42 (1-2):35-.
    It is one of the attractions of Greek syntax that it provides an abundance of usages which require careful discrimination, if we are to appreciate their value; and which at the same time present problems of interpretation which have not been completely solved. This is particularly the case with the use of the negatives, and it is one of these constructions with which we are concerned here.
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  43. Dates, Tenseless Verbs and Token-Reflexivity.Peter Mott - 1973 - Mind 82 (325):73-85.
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  44. On the Acquisition of Motion Verbs Cross-Linguistically.Anna Papafragou - unknown
    Languages encode motion in strikingly different ways. Languages such as English communicate the manner of motion through verbs (e.g., roll, pop), while languages such as Greek often lexicalize the path of motion in verbs (e.g., ascend, pass). In a set of studies with English- and Greek-speaking adults and 5-year-olds, we ask how such lexical constraints are combined with structural cues in hypothesizing meanings for novel motion verbs. We show that lexicalization biases generate different interpretations of novel motion verbs across ages (...)
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  45. The Irregular Verbs.Steven Pinker - unknown
    The irregulars are defiantly quirky. Thousands of verbs monotonously take the -ed suffix for their past tense forms, but ring mutates to rang, not ringed, catch becomes caught, hit doesn't do anything, and go is replaced by an entirely different word, went (a usurping of the old past tense of to wend, which itself once followed the pattern we see in send-sent and bend-bent). No wonder irregular verbs are banned in "rationally designed" languages like Esperanto and Orwell's Newspeak -- and (...)
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  46. Contrastive Verb Constructions in Korean.Peter Sells - unknown
    This paper addresses the correct analysis of Korean examples like those in (1).∗ An event is presented against a contrastive or negative implication, through either a copy of the verbal lexeme, or the use of the supporting verb ha-ta.
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  47. Observations on Embedding Verbs, Evidentiality, and Presupposition.Mandy Simons - manuscript
    This paper discusses the semantically parenthetical use of clauseembedding verbs such as see, hear, think, believe, discover and know. When embedding verbs are used in this way, the embedded clause carries the main point of the utterance, while the main clause serves some discourse function. Frequently, this function is evidential, with the parenthetical verb carrying information about the source and reliability of the embedded claim, or about the speaker’s emotional orientation to it. Other functions of parenthetical uses of verbs are (...)
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  48. Certain Verbs Are Syntactically Explicit Quantifiers.Anna Szabolcsi - 2010 - The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 6 (1):5.
    Quantification over individuals, times, and worlds can in principle be made explicit in the syntax of the object language, or left to the semantics and spelled out in the meta-language. The traditional view is that quantification over individuals is syntactically explicit, whereas quantification over times and worlds is not. But a growing body of literature proposes a uniform treatment. This paper examines the scopal interaction of aspectual raising verbs (begin), modals (can), and intensional raising verbs (threaten) with quantificational subjects in (...)
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  49. Overt Nominative Subjects in Infinitival Complements in Hungarian.Anna Szabolcsi - 2009 - In Marcel den Dikken & Robert Vago (eds.), Approaches to Hungarian 11. John Benjamins. pp. 251–276.
    We argue that the infinitival complements of subject-control and subject-to-subject raising verbs in Hungarian can have overt nominative subjects. The infinitival subject status of these DPs is diagnosed by constituent order, binding properties, and scope interpretation. Long-distance Agree(ment) and multiple agreement are crucial to their overtness.
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  50. Tense and Continuity.Barry Taylor - 1977 - Linguistics and Philosophy 1 (2):199 - 220.
    The paper proposes a formal account of Aristotle's trichotomy of verbs, in terms of properties of their continuous tensings, into S(state)-verbs, K(kinesis)-verbs, and E-(energeia)-verbs. Within a Fregean tense framework in which predicates are relativized to times, an account of the continuous tenses is presented and a preliminary account of the trichotomy devised, which permits an illuminating analogy to be drawn between the temporal properties of E- and K-verbs and the spatial properties of stuffs and substances. This analogy is drawn upon (...)
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