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History/traditions: Violence

1857 found
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1 — 50 / 1857
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  1. Values, Violence, and Our Future.Gary J. Acquaviva (ed.) - 2000 - Rodopi.
    This book identifies the character of human predators who violate others or themselves. The contagion of violence infects values that affect behavior. But we may call upon the intrinsic values of love, compassion, and creativity to oppose such violence. The book boldly argues for a renewal of the spiritual energy that gave rise to civilization.
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  2. Suzanne's Fall: Innocence and Seduction in "La Religieuse".Tracy Adams - 1998 - Diderot Studies 27:13 - 28.
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  3. Education in Nonviolence: Levinas' Talmudic Readings and the Study of Sacred Texts.Hanan Alexander - 2014 - Ethics and Education 9 (1):58-68.
  4. Self-Defense, Justification and Excuse.Larry Alexander - 1993 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 22 (1):53-66.
  5. Private Military and Security Companies and the Liberal Conception of Violence.Andrew Alexandra - 2012 - Criminal Justice Ethics 31 (3):158-174.
    Abstract The institution of war is the broad framework of rules, norms, and organizations dedicated to the prevention, prosecution, and resolution of violent conflict between political entities. Important parts of that institution consist of the accountability arrangements that hold between armed forces, the political leaders who oversee and direct the use of those forces, and the people in whose name the leaders act and from whose ranks the members of the armed forces are drawn. Like other parts of the institution, (...)
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  6. Mahatma Gandhi on Violence and Peace Education.Douglas Allen - 2007 - Philosophy East and West 57 (3):290-310.
    : Gandhi can serve as a valuable catalyst allowing us to rethink our philosophical positions on violence, nonviolence, and education. Especially insightful are Gandhi's formulations of the multidimensionality of violence, including educational violence, and the violence of the status quo. His peace education offers many possibilities for dealing with short-term violence, but its greatest strength is its long-term preventative education and socialization. Key to Gandhi's peace education are his ethical and ontological formulations of means-ends relations; the need to uncover root (...)
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  7. National Love in Violent Times. [REVIEW]Elisabeth Anker - 2008 - Political Theory 36 (5):762 - 769.
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  8. The Caveman and the Bomb.Anatole Anton - 1990 - Social Philosophy Today 3:425-426.
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  9. Revolution, Violence, and Power: A Correspondence.Hannah Arendt & Hans Jürgen Benedict - 2009 - Constellations 16 (2):302-306.
  10. What is Left of the Angel?R. Argullol - 2007 - Diogenes 54 (3):77-79.
    The author raises the problem of the presence of terror in contemporary life. He analyzes the continuous dynamic between fear, terror and hopes of peace in contemporary societies. Dignity appears as a blueprint of the ubiquitous presence of terror and fear.
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  11. The Revolution Betrayed.C. J. Arthur - 1972 - Radical Philosophy 3:2.
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  12. On Violence in Habermas's Philosophy of Language.Samantha Ashenden - 2014 - European Journal of Political Theory 13 (4):427-452.
    Habermas does not rule out the possibility of violence in language. In fact his account explicitly licenses a broad conception of violence as ‘systematically distorted communication’. Yet he does rule out the possibility that language simultaneously imposes as it discloses. That is, his argument precludes the possibility of recognizing that there is an antinomy at the heart of language and philosophical reason. This occlusion of the simultaneously world-disclosing and world-imposing character of language feeds and sustains Habermas’s legal and political arguments, (...)
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  13. Violence and the End of Revolution After 1989.Stefan Auer - 2009 - Thesis Eleven 97 (1):6-25.
    The series of Velvet revolutions in 1989, which brought about the collapse of communism in Europe, seem to have vindicated those political theorists and activists who believed in the possibility of non-violent power. The relative success of the 1989 revolutions has validated a new paradigm of revolutionary change based on the assumption that radical changes were attainable through moderate means. Yet the legacy of these non-violent revolutions also points towards the limits of political strategies fundamentally opposed to violence. The article (...)
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  14. Philosophy for Militants.Alain Badiou - 2013 - Verso.
    Enigmatic relationship between philosophy and politics -- Figure of the soldier -- Politics as a nonexpressive dialectics.
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  15. Enjoining Coercion: Squaring Civil Protection Orders with the Reality of Domestic Abuse.Jeffrey R. Baker - unknown
    Every state provides civil protection for victims of domestic abuse, but these regimes typically fixate on physical violence. Domestic abuse, however, does not spring from violent tendencies. Rather, abuse arises from a perpetrator's desire to exert power and control over his victim. Abusers often deploy emotional, economic, political and social tactics to coerce responses from vulnerable partners long before they resort to violence. Violence is the extreme tool to maintain control when a victim challenges the abuser's power over her life. (...)
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  16. Outlines of a Topography of Cruelty: Citizenship and Civility in the Era of Global Violence.Etienne Balibar - 2001 - Constellations 8 (1):15-29.
  17. Az Erőszak Kritikája: Tanulmányok.László Levente Balogh - 2011 - Debreceni Egyetemi Kiadó.
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  18. Organising Violence in World Politics: A Review Essay.Tarak Barkawi - 2002 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 5 (1):101-120.
  19. Exemplary Values: Value, Violence, and Others of Value.Lindon Barrett - 1992 - Substance 21 (1):77.
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  20. Making Exceptions.J. Bartelson - 1997 - Political Theory 25 (3):323-346.
  21. Constitutional Violence.David Bates - manuscript
    The eighteenth-century is usually looked to as the theoretical source for modern concepts of constitutionality, those political and legal forms that limit conflict. And yet the eighteenth century was also a period of almost constant war, within Europe and in the new global spaces of colonial rule. Though it is well known that new concepts of international law emerged in this period, surprisingly few commentators have established what connections there are between the violence of war and the elaboration of new (...)
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  22. Elementary- and Middle-School Teachers' Reasoning About Intervening in School Violence: An Examination of Violence-Prone School Subcontexts.William J. Behre, Ron Avi Astor & Heather Ann Meyer - 2001 - Journal of Moral Education 30 (2):131-153.
    The study compared middle-school and elementary-school teachers' (N = 108) reasoning about their professional roles when violence occurred in "undefined" and potentially violence-prone school subcontexts (e.g. hallways, cafeterias, playgrounds). The study combined concepts from urban planing, architecture, criminology and cognitive developmental domain theory to explore teachers' moral attributions towards school spaces. Participants were asked to locate dangerous locations and discuss their professional roles in those locations. Teachers were also given hypothetical situations where the specific subcontexts (i.e. hallways, classroom, school yard) (...)
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  23. Reading Corpses: Interpretive Violence.David F. Bell - 1998 - Substance 27 (2):92.
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  24. Introduction: Reading Violence.David F. Bell & Lawrence R. Schehr - 1998 - Substance 27 (2).
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  25. Perpetual Peace and the Invention of Total War.Robert Bernasconi - 2011 - In Nathan Eckstrand & Christopher S. Yates (eds.), Philosophy and the Return of Violence: Studies From This Widening Gyre. Continuum International Publishing Group.
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  26. The Definition of Massacre.Joseph Betz - 2001 - Social Philosophy Today 17:9-19.
    Examining the reasons for the conventional application of the term 'massacre' to some sorts of killings but not others, I arrive at this definition of the term. A massacre is the mass murder and mutilation of innocent victims by an assailant or assailants immediately present at the scene. This is a conventional and not a stipulative definition. Many standard definitions are imprecise for several reasons. They might say the killing is unnecessary or indiscriminate or at a distance or they might (...)
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  27. Commentary: Attacking Youth Violence.Joseph R. Biden - 1998 - Criminal Justice Ethics 17 (1):2-67.
  28. Agamben on Violence, Language, and Human Rights.Peg Birmingham - 2011 - In Nathan Eckstrand & Christopher S. Yates (eds.), Philosophy and the Return of Violence: Studies From This Widening Gyre. Continuum International Publishing Group.
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  29. Defending A Rodinian Account of Self-Defense.Jacob Blair - 2012 - Review Journal of Political Philosophy 9:7-47.
    There’s a widespread intuition that if the only way an innocent person can stop her villainous attacker from killing her is to kill him instead, then she is morally permitted to do so. But why is it that she is permitted to employ lethal force on an aggressor if that is what is required to save her life? My primary goal in this paper is to defend David Rodin's fairly recent and under-recognized account of self-defense that answers this question. There (...)
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  30. Emotions as Mediators and Modulators of Violence: Some Reflections on the “Seville Statement on Violence”.D. Blanchard & Robert Blanchard - 2000 - Social Research 67.
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  31. Violence et démocratie délibérative : introduction.Martin Blanchard - 2012 - Les ateliers de l'éthique/The Ethics Forum 7 (1):45-49.
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  32. Towards an Anthropology of Violence: Existential Analyses of Levinas, Girard, Freud.Jeffrey Bloechl - 2011 - In Nathan Eckstrand & Christopher S. Yates (eds.), Philosophy and the Return of Violence: Studies From This Widening Gyre. Continuum International Publishing Group.
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  33. Slavoj Žižek, Violence. [REVIEW]Geoff Boucher - 2009 - Critical Horizons 10 (3):425-430.
  34. Mandated Child Abuse Reporting.Richard Bourne, Eli H. Newberger & C. Sue White - forthcoming - Ethics and Behavior.
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  35. Philosophy of Global Security.Vihren Bouzov - 2015 - In Ioan-Alexandru Tofan Mihai-Dan Chiţoiu (ed.), Proceedings of the International Conference “Humanities and Social Sciences Today. Classical and Contemporary Issues” – Philosophy and Other Humanities. pp. 43-51.
    We are living in an imbalanced and insecure world. It is torn by violent conflicts on a global scale: between the West and the East, between rich and poor countries, between Christianity and Islam, between the Great Forces and naughty countries, between a global capitalist elite and workers and between the global democratic community and global terrorism. An optimistic thesis will be grounded asserting that varied cultures and civilizations can solve all existing problems and contradictions peacefully and can carry out (...)
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  36. Political Violence and/as Evil : Sartre's Dirty Hands.Cristian Bratu - 2011 - In Scott M. Powers (ed.), Evil in Contemporary French and Francophone Literature. Cambridge Scholars Press.
  37. Violence and Power: A Critique of Hannah Arendt on the `Political'.Keith Breen - 2007 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 33 (3):343-372.
    In contrast to political realism's equation of the `political' with domination, Hannah Arendt understood the `political' as a relation of friendship utterly opposed to the use of violence. This article offers a critique of that understanding. It becomes clear that Arendt's challenge to realism, as exemplified by Max Weber, succeeds on account of a dubious redefinition of the `political' that is the reverse image of the one-sided vision of politics she had hoped to contest. Questioning this paradoxical turn leads to (...)
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  38. Wielding the Rod of Punishment – War and Violence in the Political Science of Kautilya.Torkel Brekke - 2004 - Journal of Military Ethics 3 (1):40-52.
    This article presents Kautilya, the most important thinker in the tradition of statecraft in India. Kautilya has influenced ideas of war and violence in much of South- and Southeast Asia and he is of great importance for a comparative understanding of the ethics of war. The violence inflicted by the king on internal and external enemies is pivotal for the maintenance of an ordered society, according to Kautilya. Prudence and treason are hallmarks of Kautilya's world. The article shows that this (...)
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  39. The Case of the Contested Firearms.George Brenkert - 1999 - Business and Society Review 104 (4):347-354.
  40. Liberalism and Fear of Violence.Bruce Buchan - 2001 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 4 (3):27-48.
    Liberal political thought is underwritten by an enduring fear of civil and state violence. It is assumed within liberal thought that self?interest characterises relations between individuals in civil society, resulting in violence. In absolutist doctrines, such as Hobbes?, the pacification of private persons depended on the Sovereign's command of a monopoly of violence. Liberals, by contrast, sought to claim that the state itself must be pacified, its capacity for cruelty (e.g., torture) removed, its capacity for violence (e.g., war) reduced and (...)
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  41. Beyond Retribution.Richard M. Buck - 2004 - Social Philosophy Today 20:67-80.
    The very nature of terrorism and the context in which it typically occurs make responding to it much more complicated, morally speaking, than responding to conventional military attacks. Two points are particularly important here: (1) terrorism often arises in the midst of conflicts that can only be resolved at the negotiating table; (2) responses to terrorist acts almost always present significant risks to the lives and well-being of noncombatants. The history of the Israel-Palestinian conflict suggests that its resolution will only (...)
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  42. Reason and Violence.C. C. - 1975 - Review of Metaphysics 29 (1):152-153.
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  43. Guns/No Guns and the Expression of Social Hostility.Delwin D. Cahoon & Ed M. Edmonds - 1984 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 22 (4):305-308.
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  44. Violence and Misery.Dom Helder Camara - 1969 - New Blackfriars 50 (589):491-496.
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  45. Partners: Discernment and Humanitarian Efforts in Settings of Violence.Nicole Gastineau Campos & Paul Farmer - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 31 (4):506-515.
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  46. Sex, Violence and Crime: Foucault and the |[Lsquo]|Man|[Rsquo]| Question.Terrell Carver - 2010 - Contemporary Political Theory 9 (3):347.
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  47. Beauvoir and Rand: Asphyxiating People, Having Sex, and Pursuing a Career.Marc Champagne & Mimi Reisel Gladstein - 2015 - The Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 15 (1):23-41.
    In an attempt to start rectifying a lamentable disparity in scholarship, we evince fruitful points of similarity and difference in the ideas of Simone de Beauvoir and Ayn Rand, paying particular attention to their views on long-term projects. Endorsing what might be called an “Ethic of Resolve,” Rand praises those who undertake sustained goal-directed actions such as careers. Beauvoir, however, endorses an “Ethic of Ambiguity” that makes her more skeptical about the prospects of carrying out lifelong projects without deluding oneself. (...)
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  48. Commentary: Moral Truisms, Empirical Evidence, and Foreign Policy.Noam Chomsky - unknown
    Many studies of world politics fail to take evidence seriously or consider basic moral truisms (for example, that the standards we apply to others we must apply to ourselves). This commentary illustrates these assessments in relation to two subjects which have attracted much interest in the West recently – terrorism and just war to combat terrorism. The evidence shows that the United States has engaged extensively in terrorism and that application of just war principles would entitle the victims of that (...)
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  49. Who Are the Global Terrorists?Noam Chomsky & Tim Dunne - unknown
    The condemnations of terrorism are sound, but leave some questions unanswered. The first is: What do we mean by "terrorism"? Second: What is the proper response to the crime? Whatever the answer, it must at least satisfy a moral truism: If we propose some principle that is to be applied to antagonists, then we must agree -- in fact, strenuously insist -- that the principle apply to us as well. Those who do not rise even to this minimal level of (...)
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  50. De uitzonderingstoestand van Giorgio Agamben naar Michel Foucault.Tim Christiaens - 2015 - Vlaams Marxistisch Tijdschrift 49 (1):104-118.
1 — 50 / 1857