Vision

Edited by Casey O'Callaghan (Washington University in St. Louis)
Related categories

114 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 114
  1. Life as Vision : Bergson and the Future of Seeing Differently.Alia Al-Saji - 2010 - In Michael R. Kelly (ed.), Bergson and Phenomenology. Palgrave-Macmillan.
  2. The Madness of Sight.Emmanuel Alloa - 2007 - In Karin Leonhard & Silke Horstkotte (eds.), Seeing Perception. Cambridge Scholars Publishing: 40-59.
    Viewing Vermeer with Merleau-Ponty's eyes.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. An Argument for Shape Internalism.Jan Almäng - 2017 - Erkenntnis 82 (4):819-836.
    This paper is a defense of an internalist view of the perception of shapes. A basic assumption of the paper is that perceptual experiences have certain parts which account both for the phenomenal character associated with perceiving shapes—phenomenal shapes—and for the intentional content presenting shapes—intentional shapes. Internalism about perceptions of shapes is defined as the claim that phenomenal shapes determine the intentional shapes. Externalism is defined as the claim that perceptual experiences represent whatever shape the phenomenal shape reliably tracks. The (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. The Myth of Persistence of Vision Revisited.Joseph Anderson & Barbara Anderson - 1993 - Journal of Film and Video 45:3--12.
  5. The Geometry of Visibles.R. B. Angell - 1974 - Noûs 8 (2):87-117.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  6. La visión en Marr y Berkeley. El problema de perderse el principio de la película.Enrique Aramendia Muneta - 2013 - Daimon: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 59:125-144.
    Se comparan las teorías de Marr y Berkeley sobre la visión a partir de las cualidades de Descartes. La descripción de tres niveles de Marr, donde la conciencia está ausente, contrasta con el nivel único de Berkeley construido sobre la conciencia y la experiencia carece de importancia en los momentos esquemáticos y cobra protagonismo en el último paso del proceso de la visión de Marr mediante la noción de marcación. Bajo la premisa de que las descripciones puramente sincrónicas han de (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Through a Shadow, Darkly.István Aranyosi - manuscript
    The dictionary tells you that a shadow is a dark area or volume caused by an opaque object blocking some light. The definition is correct, but we need to clarify a couple of its elements: darkness and blocking. The clarification leads to the view that to see a shadow is a degree of failing to see a surface. I will also argue that seeing a silhouette (i.e. a backlit object) is a particular way of failing to see an object. Thus (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Towards a Genealogy of the Metaphysics of Sight: Seeing, Hearing, and Thinking in Heraclitus and Parmenides.Jussi Backman - 2015 - In Antonio Cimino & Pavlos Kontos (eds.), Phenomenology and the Metaphysics of Sight. Brill. pp. 11-34.
    The paper outlines a tentative genealogy of the Platonic metaphysics of sight by thematizing pre-Platonic thought, particularly Heraclitus and Parmenides. By “metaphysics of sight” it understands the features of Platonic-Aristotelian metaphysics expressed with the help of visual metaphors. It is argued that the Platonic metaphysics of sight can be regarded as the result of a synthesis of the Heraclitean and Parmenidean approaches. In pre-Platonic thought, the visual paradigm is still marginal. For Heraclitus, the basic structure of being is its discursive (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Through Deaf Eyes: A Photographic History of an American Community.Douglas Baynton, Jack R. Gannon & Jean Lindquist Bergey - 2007 - Gallaudet University Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. How the World Is Measured Up in Size Experience.David J. Bennett - 2011 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 83 (2):345-365.
    I develop a Russellian representationalist account of size experience that draws importantly from contemporary vision science research on size perception. The core view is that size is experienced in ‘body-scaled’ units. So, an object might, say, be experienced as two eye-level units high. The view is sharpened in response to Thompson’s (forthcoming) Doubled Earth example. This example is presented by Thompson as part of an argument for a Fregean view of size experience. But I argue that the Russellian view I (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  11. Sight and Embodiment in the Middle Ages.Suzannah Biernoff - 2002 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Sight and Embodiment in the Middle Ages breaks new ground by bringing postmodern writings on vision and embodiment into dialogue with medieval texts and images: an interdisciplinary strategy that illuminates and complicates both cultures. This is an invaluable reference work for anyone interested in the history and theory of visuality, and it is essential reading or scholars of art, science, or spirituality in the medieval period.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. A New Look at Vision.David Blinder - 1986 - Topoi 5 (September):137-148.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  13. Bodily Action and Distal Attribution in Sensory Substitution.Robert Briscoe - forthcoming - In Fiona Macpherson (ed.), Sensory Substitution and Augmentation. Proceedings of the British Academy.
    According to proponents of the sensorimotor contingency theory of perception (Hurley & Noë 2003, Noë 2004, O’Regan 2011), active control of camera movement is necessary for the emergence of distal attribution in tactile-visual sensory substitution (TVSS) because it enables the subject to acquire knowledge of the way stimulation in the substituting modality varies as a function of self-initiated, bodily action. This chapter, by contrast, approaches distal attribution as a solution to a causal inference problem faced by the subject’s perceptual systems. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Depiction, Pictorial Experience, and Vision Science.Robert Briscoe - 2016 - Philosophical Topics 44 (2):43-81.
    Pictures are 2D surfaces designed to elicit 3D-scene-representing experiences from their viewers. In this essay, I argue that philosophers have tended to underestimate the relevance of research in vision science to understanding the nature of pictorial experience. Both the deeply entrenched methodology of virtual psychophysics as well as empirical studies of pictorial space perception provide compelling support for the view that pictorial experience and seeing face-to-face are experiences of the same psychological, explanatory kind. I also show that an empirically informed (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Perceiving the Present: Systematization of Illusions or Illusion of Systematization?Robert Briscoe - 2010 - Cognitive Science 34 (8):1530-1542.
    Mark Changizi et al. (2008) claim that it is possible systematically to organize more than 50 kinds of illusions in a 7 × 4 matrix of 28 classes. This systematization, they further maintain, can be explained by the operation of a single visual processing latency correction mechanism that they call “perceiving the present” (PTP). This brief report raises some concerns about the way a number of illusions are classified by the proposed systematization. It also poses two general problems—one empirical and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  16. Egocentric Spatial Representation in Action and Perception.Robert Briscoe - 2009 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 79 (2):423-460.
    Neuropsychological findings used to motivate the "two visual systems" hypothesis have been taken to endanger a pair of widely accepted claims about spatial representation in conscious visual experience. The first is the claim that visual experience represents 3-D space around the perceiver using an egocentric frame of reference. The second is the claim that there is a constitutive link between the spatial contents of visual experience and the perceiver's bodily actions. In this paper, I review and assess three main sources (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  17. Gombrich and the Duck-Rabbit.Robert Eamon Briscoe - forthcoming - In Michael Beaney (ed.), Aspect Perception after Wittgenstein: Seeing-As and Novelty. Routledge.
  18. The Spatial Threshold of Touch in Blind and in Seeing Children.Margaret S. Brown & George M. Stratton - 1925 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 8 (6):434.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Visual Perception: Physiology, Psychology, and Ecology.Vicki Bruce & Patrick Green - 1985 - Lawerence Erlbaum.
  20. Marr's Theory of Vision.Tyler Burge - 1989 - In Modularity in Knowledge Representation and Natural-Language Understanding. Cambridge: MIT Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Inverse Gnomonic Projection of Plane Regions.F. Thomas Burke - 2011 - Wolfram Demonstrations Project.
    This demonstration shows inverse gnomonic projections of flat surface areas lying in a horizontal plane tangent to the projection sphere. It shows how optical surface area varies regularly as the distance of the respective surface area from the eye varies, decreasing as the latter increases. According to ecological psychology, this kind of regularity or "invariant" is what sensory systems are designed to detect. Attunement to such invariants in the interactions of eyes and terrains make possible the perception of distance and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Seeing and Retinal Stability: On a Sensorimotor Argument for the Necessity of Eye Movement for Sight.Dan Cavedon-Taylor - 2013 - Philosophical Psychology 26 (2):263 - 266.
    Sensorimotor theorists of perception have argued that eye movement is a necessary condition for seeing on the basis that subjects whose retinal images do not move undergo a form of blindness. I show that the argument does not work.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Android Epistemology.Paul M. Churchland - 1995 - Cambridge: MIT Press.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  24. Machine Stereopsis: A Feedforward Network for Fast Stereo Vision with Movable Fusion Plane.Paul M. Churchland - 1995 - In Android Epistemology. Cambridge: MIT Press.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Three Varieties of Visual Field.Austen Clark - 1996 - Philosophical Psychology 9 (4):477-95.
    The goal of this paper is to challenge the rather insouciant attitude that many investigators seem to adopt when they go about describing the items and events in their " visual fields". There are at least three distinct categories of interpretation of what these reports might mean, and only under one of those categories do those reports have anything resembling an observational character. The others demand substantive revisions in one's beliefs about what one sees. The ur-concept of a " visual (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  26. Investigating What Felt Shapes Look Like.Sam Clarke - 2016 - I-Perception 7 (1).
    A recent empirical study claims to show that the answer to Molyneux’s question is negative, but, as John Schwenkler points out, its findings are inconclusive: Subjects tested in this study probably lacked the visual acuity required for a fair assessment of the question. Schwenkler is undeterred. He argues that the study could be improved by lowering the visual demands placed on subjects, a suggestion later endorsed and developed by Kevin Connolly. I suggest that Connolly and Schwenkler both underestimate the difficulties (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Color Ontology and Color Science.Jonathan Cohen & Mohan Matthen (eds.) - 2010 - Bradford.
    Philosophers and scientists have long speculated about the nature of color. Atomists such as Democritus thought color to be "conventional," not real; Galileo and other key figures of the Scientific Revolution thought that it was an erroneous projection of our own sensations onto external objects. More recently, philosophers have enriched the debate about color by aligning the most advanced color science with the most sophisticated methods of analytical philosophy. In this volume, leading scientists and philosophers examine new problems with new (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Bálint’s Syndrome, Object Seeing, and Spatial Perception.French Craig - forthcoming - Mind & Language.
    Ordinary cases of object seeing involve the visual perception of space and spatial location. But does seeing an object require such spatial perception? An empirical challenge to the idea that it does comes from reflection upon Bálint’s syndrome, for it is supposed that in Bálint’s syndrome subjects can see objects without seeing space or spatial location. In this paper, I question whether the empirical evidence available to us adequately supports this understanding of Bálint’s syndrome, and explain how the aforementioned empirical (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. On the Status of Visuals in Berkeley's 'New Theory of Vision'.Phillip D. Cummins - 1987 - In Ernest Sosa (ed.), Essays on the Philosophy of George Berkeley. D. Reidel.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  30. Reconceiving Perceptual Space.James E. Cutting - 2003 - In Heiko Hecht, Robert Schwartz & Margaret Atherton (eds.), Looking Into Pictures. MIT Press.
  31. Il Rilievo Della Visione Movimento, Profondità, Cinema Ne Le Monde Sensible et Le Monde De L'Expression (Italian).Anna Caterina Dalmasso - 2010 - Chiasmi International 12:83-110.
    Le relief de la vision. Mouvement, profondeur et cinéma dansLe monde sensible et le monde de l’expressionEst-il possible d’établir une connexion entre Le monde sensible et le monde de l’expression et la pensée du dernier Merleau-Ponty? De quelle manière une formulation germinale de la réflexion ontologique serait-elle présente dans le cours de 1953? Et quels sont les éléments de contact et de convergence qui permettent de retracer un tel lien?J’ai l’intention de proposer cette hypothèse à partir d’une considération du thème (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. Varieties of Visual Representation.John Dilworth - 2002 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 32 (2):183-206.
    Pictorial representation is one species of visual representation--but not the only one, I argue. There are three additional varieties or species of visual representation--namely 'structural', 'aspect' and 'integrative' representation--which together comprise a category of 'delineative' rather than depictive visual representation. I arrive at this result via consideration of previously neglected orientational factors that serve to distinguish the two categories. I conclude by arguing that pictures (unlike 'delineations') are not physical objects, and that their multiplicity and modal narrowness motivates a view (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  33. On the Psychological Explanation of Visual Perception.B. A. Farrell - 1977 - Synthese 35 (3):353 - 379.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Walking Through Apertures: Assessing Judgments Obtained From Multiple Modalities.Luis H. Favela - 2014 - Dissertation, University of Cincinnati
    According to Gibson's ecological theory of perception-action, the proper objects of perception are affordances. Affordances are directly perceivable, environmental opportunities for behavior. The current study assessed affordance judgments, and the confidence ratings corresponding to those judgments, of aperture pass-through-ability based on three modes of perceiving. The modes were vision and two blindfolded conditions involving haptic perception via technological aids: A cane and the Enactive Torch (ET). The first hypothesis, that vision would provide judgments of the critical boundary most similar to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Vision's Invisibles: Philosophical Explorations.Veronique M. Foti - 2003 - State University of New York Press.
    Examines the construction of vision in the works of Heraclitus, Plato, Descartes, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Foucault, Nancy, and Derrida.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  36. The Ontology of Some Afterimages.Bryan Frances - forthcoming - In Manuel Curado & Steven Gouvei (eds.), Untitled Philosophy of Mind Book.
    A good portion of the work in the ontology of color focuses on color properties, trying to figure out how they are related to more straightforwardly physical properties. Another focus is realism: are ordinary material objects such as pumpkins really colored? A third emphasis is the nature of what is referred to by the terms ‘what it’s like’ or ‘phenomenal character’, as applied to color. In contrast, this essay is exclusively about select color tokens. I will be arguing that whether (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Why Afterimages Are Metaphysically Mysterious.Bryan Frances - forthcoming - Think.
    A short essay for a popular audience on why afterimages are difficult to fit into any ontology.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Acuity and the Statistical Theory of Figural Aftereffects.F. H. George - 1962 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 63 (5):423.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Vision and Mind.Vadim D. Glezer - 1989 - In Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science, VIII. New York: Elsevier Science.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. The Extension of Color Sensations: Reid, Stewart, and Fearn.Giovanni B. Grandi - 2014 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (Supplement 1):51-79.
    It seems to be a consequence of Reid’s views on sensations that colour sensations are not extended nor are they arranged in figured patterns. Reid further claimed that ‘there is no sensation appropriated to visible figure.’ As I show, Reid tried to justify these controversial claims by appeal to Cheselden’s report of the experiences of a young man affected by severe cataracts, and by appeal to cases of perception of visible figure without colour. While holding fast to the principle that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Reid and Wells on Single and Double Vision.Giovanni B. Grandi - 2010 - Journal of Scottish Thought 3:143-163.
    In a recent article on Reid’s theory of single and double vision, James Van Cleve considers an argument against direct realism presented by Hume. Hume argues for the mind-dependent nature of the objects of our perception from the phenomenon of double vision. Reid does not address this particular argument, but Van Cleve considers possible answers Reid might have given to Hume. He finds fault with all these answers. Against Van Cleve, I argue that both appearances in double vision could be (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Visual Content, Expectations, and the Outside World.Dominic Gregory - 2015 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 115 (2pt2):109-130.
    Some philosophers—for example, Husserl, Alva Noë and Susanna Siegel—have claimed that the contents of visual sensations standardly include references to the later visual episodes that one would have under certain conditions. The current paper claims that there are no good reasons for accepting that view. Instead, it is argued that the conscious phenomena which have been cited as manifesting the presence within visual contents of references to ways that things would look in the course of later visual sensations are better (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Un Débat Scientifique Exemplaire: Mariotte, Pecquet Et Perrault À la Recherche du Siège de la Perception Visuelle.Mirko D. Grmek - 1985 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 7 (2):217 - 255.
    Mariotte's discovery of the blind spot is often quoted, but his contribution to the physiology of vision is generally underestimated. Surprised by the result of his fundamental experiment, Mariotte abandoned his starting hypothesis on the physiological role of the retina and came to the conclusion that the site of vision is the 'choroid'. This was the name not only for the choroid layer in the modern sense but also for the pigmentated part of the retina, where Mariotte localized the seat (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  44. The Visual Field and Perception, Part I.David W. Hamlyn - 1957 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 107:107-124.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. A Sticky Space Model for Explanation and Individuation of Anchoring Effects.Robert Hatcher - unknown
    Current explanations for anchoring phenomena seem to be unable to account for the diversity of effects found by 40 years of research. Additionally, the theories do not have much to say about the processes that make anchors so resilient to modification. I argue that by focusing on the mechanisms involved in spatial representation, we can account for most anchoring effects which have spatial components.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Natural Geometry in Descartes and Kepler.Gary Hatfield - 2015 - Res Philosophica 92 (1):117-148.
    According to Kepler and Descartes, the geometry of the triangle formed by the two eyes when focused on a single point affords perception of the distance to that point. Kepler characterized the processes involved as associative learning. Descartes described the processes as a “ natural geometry.” Many interpreters have Descartes holding that perceivers calculate the distance to the focal point using angle-side-angle, calculations that are reduced to unnoticed mental habits in adult vision. This article offers a purely psychophysiological interpretation of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. On Natural Geometry and Seeing Distance Directly in Descartes.Gary Hatfield - 2015 - In Vincenzo De Risi (ed.), Mathematizing Space: The Objects of Geometry from Antiquity to the Early Modern Age. Berlin: Birkhäuser. pp. 157-91.
    As the word “optics” was understood from antiquity into and beyond the early modern period, it did not mean simply the physics and geometry of light, but meant the “theory of vision” and included what we should now call physiological and psychological aspects. From antiquity, these aspects were subject to geometrical analysis. Accordingly, the geometry of visual experience has long been an object of investigation. This chapter examines accounts of size and distance perception in antiquity (Euclid and Ptolemy) and the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Good Gestalt: Metzger on Seeing. [REVIEW]Gary Hatfield - 2011 - Metascience 20 (1):81-85.
    Review of Wolfgang Metzger, Laws of Seeing, trans. Lothar Spillman, Steven Lehar, Mimsey Stromeyer, and Michael Wertheimer. MIT Press, 2006; paperback, 2009. Pp. xxv+203. £18.95 PB. Original German edition published in 1936.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Philosophy of Perception and the Phenomenology of Visual Space.Gary Hatfield - 2011 - Philosophic Exchange 42 (1):31-66.
    In the philosophy of perception, direct realism has come into vogue. Philosophical authors assert and assume that what their readers want, and what anyone should want, is some form of direct realism. There are disagreements over precisely what form this direct realism should take. The majority of positions in favor now offer a direct realism in which objects and their material or physical properties constitute the contents of perception, either because we have an immediate or intuitive acquaintance with those objects (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Perception and Cognition: Essays in the Philosophy of Psychology.Gary C. Hatfield - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Representation and content in some (actual) theories of perception -- Representation in perception and cognition : task analysis, psychological functions, and rule instantiation -- Perception as unconscious inference -- Representation and constraints : the inverse problem and the structure of visual space -- On perceptual constancy -- Getting objects for free (or not) : the philosophy and psychology of object perception -- Color perception and neural encoding : does metameric matching entail a loss of information? -- Objectivity and subjectivity revisited (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
1 — 50 / 114