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  1. Whistle Blowing.Richard T. De George - forthcoming - Hoffman, W. Michael/Moore, Jennifer M.(Hg.): Business Ethics. New York.
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  2. The Ethical and Practical Aspects of Whistle Blowing.A. Lewicka-Strzalecka - forthcoming - Business Ethics: From Theory to Practice.
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  3. An Anatomy of Whistle Blowing.Ralph Nader - forthcoming - Essentials of Business Ethics.
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  4. Personal Trust, Public Accountability, and the Justification of Whistleblowing.Emanuela Ceva & Michele Bocchiola - 2019 - Journal of Political Philosophy 27 (2):187-206.
    Whistleblowing (WB) is the practice of reporting immoral or illegal behavior by members of a legitimate organization with privileged access to information concerning an alleged wrongdoing within that organization. A common critique of WB draws on its supposed consequence of generating a climate of mutual distrust. This wariness is heightened in the case of external WB, which may lead to weakening public trust in an organization by diminishing its credibility. Accordingly, even the defenders of WB have presented it as an (...)
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  5. The Philosophy of Taking Conspiracy Theories Seriously. [REVIEW]Ori Freiman - 2019 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 8 (9):51-61.
    During the last few decades, the proliferation of interest in conspiracy theories became a widespread phenomenon in our culture, and also in academia. In this piece, I review a new book on the topic of conspiracy theory theory (that is-the theory of conspiracy theories) Taking Conspiracy Theories Seriously, edited by M R. X. Dentith. To contextualize the review, I first turn to the '90s, to see what sparked current interest in conspiracy theories within the field of analytic philosophy. I then (...)
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  6. Social Workers as Collaborators? The Ethics of Working Within Australia’s Asylum System.Christopher Maylea & Asher Hirsch - 2018 - Ethics and Social Welfare 12 (2):160-178.
  7. Secrecy, Transparency and Government Whistleblowing.William H. Harwood - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (2):164-186.
    In the first part of the 21st century, the complicated relationship between transparency and security reached a boiling point with revelations of extra-judicial CIA activities, near universal NSA monitoring and unprecedented whistleblowing – and prosecution of whistleblowers under the Espionage Act. This article examines the dual necessities of security and transparency for any democracy, and the manner in which whistleblowers radically saddle this Janus-faced relationship. Then I will move to contemporary examples of whistleblowing, showing how and why some prove more (...)
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  8. Podejście Umiarkowane W Sporze o Możliwość I Użyteczność Moraln¸a Kodyfikacji Norm Etycznych.Andrzej Klimczuk - 2014 - Annales. Ethics in Economic Life 17 (1):47--59.
    Popularyzacja tworzenia kodeksów zaadresowanych do różnych grup społecznych jest jedn¸a} z cech współczesnego świata. Wśród badaczy tego zjawiska nie ma jednak pełnej zgody na zasadność i użyteczność moraln¸a} tej działalności. Artykuł przybliża przegl¸a}d literatury przedmiotu w zakresie dotycz¸a}cym argumentów za stworzeniem umiarkowanego stanowiska na rzecz kodyfikacji norm etycznych. Przybliżono główne pojȩcia dotycz¸ace kodeksów etycznych i stanowiska za ich przyjȩciem i odrzuceniem. Zwrócono uwagȩ na sposoby zwiȩkszania skuteczności kodeksów oraz procedurȩ podejmowania decyzji etycznych w sposób godz¸acy podejścia zwolenników i przeciwników kodyfikacji. (...)
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  9. Whistleblowing: A Critical Philosophical Analysis of the Component Moral Decisions of the Act and Some New Perspectives on its Moral Significance.Patrick O'Sullivan & Ola Ngau - 2014 - Business Ethics: A European Review 23 (4):401-415.
    Discussions of whistleblowing whether in academic literature or in more popular media have tended to very one-sided assessments of the moral worth of the act. Indeed, much of the current literature concentrates on psychological or managerial aspects of whistleblowing while taking for granted this or that moral position or eschewing any normative commitment on the question. The purpose of this article is firstly to reemphasise the importance and complexity of the normative foundations of whistleblowing acts; and secondly, through a moral (...)
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  10. Understanding Pharmaceutical Research Manipulation in the Context of Accounting Manipulation.Abigail Brown - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (3):611-619.
    The problem of the manipulation of data that arises when there is both opportunity and incentive to mislead is better accepted and studied — though by no means solved — in financial accounting than in medicine. This article analyzes pharmaceutical company manipulation of medical research as part of a broader problem of corporate manipulation of data in the creation of accounting profits. The article explores how our understanding of accounting fraud and misinformation helps us understand the risk of similar information (...)
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  11. Prediction of Whistleblowing or Non-Reporting Observation: The Role of Personal and Situational Factors. [REVIEW]P. G. Cassematis & R. Wortley - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (3):615-634.
    This study examined whether it was possible to classify Australian public sector employees as either whistleblowers or non-reporting observers using personal and situational variables. The personal variables were demography (gender, public sector tenure, organisational tenure and age), work attitudes (job satisfaction, trust in management, whistleblowing propensity) and employee behaviour (organisational citizenship behaviour). The situational variables were perceived personal victimisation, fear of reprisals and perceived wrongdoing seriousness. These variables were used as predictors in a series of binary logistic regressions. It was (...)
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  12. The Joint Effects of Machiavellianism and Ethical Environment on Whistle-Blowing.Derek Dalton & Robin R. Radtke - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (1):153-172.
    Given the importance of the Machiavellianism construct on informing a wide range of ethics research, we focus on gaining a better understanding of Machiavellianism within the whistle-blower context. In this regard, we examine the effect of Machiavellianism on whistle-blowing, focusing on the underlying mechanisms through which Machiavellianism affects whistle-blowing. Further, because individuals who are higher in Machiavellianism (high Machs) are expected to be less likely to report wrongdoing, we examine the ability of an organization’s ethical environment to increase whistle-blowing intentions (...)
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  13. Let the Story Go: The Role of Emotion in the Decision-Making Process of the Reluctant, Vulnerable Witness or Whistle-Blower. [REVIEW]James Hollings - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (3):501-512.
    This paper draws on cognitive psychological theory to explain the role of emotion in the decision-making process of four reluctant, vulnerable witnesses to wrongdoing, who were persuaded to blow the whistle on matters of substantial public interest. It proposes a theoretical explanation for the role of emotion on whistle-blower or witness decision-making, based on the Iterative Reprocessing Model and drawing on appraisal-based theories of cognitive psychology. It concludes that the decision to speak is preceded by an intense emotional episode, probably (...)
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  14. Do I Hear the Whistle…? A First Attempt to Measure Four Forms of Employee Silence and Their Correlates.Michael Knoll & Rolf Dick - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 113 (2):349-362.
    Silence in organizations refers to a state in which employees refrain from calling attention to issues at work such as illegal or immoral practices or developments that violate personal, moral, or legal standards. While Morrison and Milliken (Acad Manag Rev 25:706–725, 2000) discussed how organizational silence as a top-down organizational level phenomenon can cause employees to remain silent, a bottom-up perspective—that is, how employee motives contribute to the occurrence and maintenance of silence in organizations—has not yet been given much research (...)
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  15. Companies' Use of Whistle-Blowing to Detect Fraud: An Examination of Corporate Whistle-Blowing Policies. [REVIEW]Gladys Lee & Neil Fargher - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (2):283-295.
    In order to provide an effective whistle-blowing system, it is expected that companies would provide employees with a high level of disclosure regarding the whistle-blowing process. This study investigates variation in the extent of whistle-blowing disclosures. As a measure of whistle-blowing implementation, this study further examines the provision of a hotline channel. The results suggest that the extent of whistle-blowing disclosures is positively associated with the permissibility of anonymous reporting and organisational support for whistle-blowing, the number of external directors on (...)
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  16. Towards a Custom-Made Whistleblowing Policy. Using Grid-Group Cultural Theory to Match Policy Measures to Different Styles of Peer Reporting.Kim Loyens - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (2):239-249.
    To be effective, whistleblowing policies should be adapted to the organisational culture. They need to be custom-made and not follow a one-size-fits-all logic, specifically when they are installed to stimulate responsible peer reporting, a highly sensitive and value-laden type of whistleblowing. This paper attempts to illustrate that grid-group cultural theory could help to construct a whistleblowing policy by linking reporting styles to the organisational culture. First, we will identify four types of policy measures that are hypothesized to be effective in (...)
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  17. Whistle-Blowing Methods for Navigating Within and Helping Reform Regulatory Institutions. [REVIEW]Richard P. Nielsen - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 112 (3):385-395.
    There are at least four important, institutional obstacles to whistle-blowing to regulatory institutions. First, regulatory institutions are often systematically understaffed and do not have the resources needed to adequately process whistle-blowing cases. Second, regulators who process whistle-blowing cases are often systematically inexperienced and do not understand the strategic importance of whistle-blowing cases. Third, regulators are often under systemic pressure from the politicians who appoint them to ignore whistle-blowing cases relevant to their sources of financial and/or ideological political support. Fourth, there (...)
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  18. Could the Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 Be Helpful in Reforming Corporate America? An Investigation on Financial Bounties and Whistle-Blowing Behaviors in the Private Sector.Kelly Richmond Pope & Chih-Chen Lee - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 112 (4):597-607.
    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the availability of financial bounties and anonymous reporting channels impact individuals’ general reporting intentions of questionable acts and whether the availability of financial bounties will prompt people to reveal their identities. The recent passage of the Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 creates a financial bounty for whistle-blowers. In addition, SOX requires companies to provide employees with an anonymous reporting channel option. It is unclear of the effect (...)
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  19. Encouraging Whistle Blowing to Improve Corporate Governance? A Malaysian Initiative.Shanthy Rachagan & Kalaithasan Kuppusamy - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 115 (2):367-382.
    This article reviews if the introduction of new laws to encourage and protect whistleblowers is sufficient to improve corporate governance in Malaysian public-listed companies. It provides suggestions to formulate internal whistle-blowing policies for companies. It concludes that due to the culture of the people and the taxonomy of Malaysian public-listed companies and companies in other countries in the Asia–Pacific region, having laws to encourage and protect whistleblowers to get rid of corporate wrong-doings is not necessarily the only solution. The article (...)
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  20. The Influence of Subjective Norms on Whistle-Blowing: A Cross-Cultural Investigation. [REVIEW]Pailin Trongmateerut & John T. Sweeney - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 112 (3):437-451.
    This research consists of two studies with interrelated objectives. The purpose of the first study is to develop and validate scales measuring whistle-blowing subjective norms, attitudes, and intentions. The objective of the second study is to test a model of whistle-blowing intentions, motivated by the theory of reasoned action, across two contrasting cultures: the collectivist Thai and the individualistic American. To achieve cross-cultural comparisons, we first perform measurement and structural invariance tests. Tests of latent mean differences lend support for our (...)
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  21. Whistleblowers in Organisations: Prophets at Work? [REVIEW]Stephanos Avakian & Joanne Roberts - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 110 (1):71-84.
    This article argues that the study of biblical prophets offers a profound contribution to understanding the experience, role and attributes of whistleblowers. Little is known in the literature about the moral triggers that lead individuals to blow the whistle in organisations or why whistleblowers may show persistence against the harshness experienced as a result of their actions. This article argues that our understanding of the whistleblower’s work is highly informed by appreciating how moral values and norms are exercised by prophets (...)
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  22. Rewarding Whistleblowers: A Conceptual Problem?Michael Davis - 2012 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (2):269-277.
    Since 2010, Section 922 of the Dodd-Frank Act has required the Securities and Exchange Commission to give a significant financial reward to any whistleblower who voluntarily discloses original information concerning fraud or other unlawful activity. How, if at all, might such “incentives” change our understanding of whistleblowing? My answer is that, while incentives should not change the definition of whistleblowing, it should change our understanding of the justification of whistleblowing. We need to distinguish the public justification of whistleblowing, its public (...)
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  23. Value Orientations as Determinants of Preference for External and Anonymous Whistleblowing.Dilek Zamantili Nayir & Christian Herzig - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 107 (2):197-213.
    Incidences of organizational wrongdoing have become wide spread throughout the whole business world. The management of organizational wrongdoings is of growing concern in organizations globally, since these types of acts can be detrimental to financial well being. Wrongdoing occurs within organizational settings and organizational members commonly have knowledge of and thus the opportunity to report the wrongdoing. An employee’s decision to report individual or organizational misconduct, i.e. blow the whistle, is a complex phenomenon that is based upon organizational, situational and (...)
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  24. The Effects of Contextual and Wrongdoing Attributes on Organizational Employees' Whistleblowing Intentions Following Fraud.Shani N. Robinson, Jesse C. Robertson & Mary B. Curtis - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 106 (2):213-227.
    Recent financial fraud legislation such as the Dodd–Frank Act and the Sarbanes–Oxley Act (U.S. House of Representatives, Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010, [H.R. 4173], 2010 ; U.S. House of Representatives, The Sarbanes–Oxley Act of 2002, Public Law 107-204 [H.R. 3763], 2002 ) relies heavily on whistleblowers for enforcement, and offers protection and incentives for whistleblowers. However, little is known about many aspects of the whistleblowing decision, especially the effects of contextual and wrongdoing attributes on organizational (...)
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  25. The Content of Whistleblowing Procedures: A Critical Review of Recent Official Guidelines. [REVIEW]Wim Vandekerckhove & David Lewis - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 108 (2):253-264.
    There is an increasing recognition of the need to provide ways for people to raise concerns about suspected wrongdoing by promoting internal policies and procedures which offer proper safeguards to actual and potential whistleblowers. Many organisations in both the public and private sectors now have such measures and these display a wide variety of operating modalities: in-house or outsourced, anonymous/confidential/identified, multi or single tiered, specified or open subject matter, etc. As a result of this development, a number of guidelines and (...)
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  26. Impact of Ethical Leadership and Leader–Member Exchange on Whistle Blowing: The Moderating Impact of the Moral Intensity of the Issue. [REVIEW]Kanika T. Bhal & Anubha Dadhich - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 103 (3):485-496.
    Given the prevalence of corporate frauds and the significance of whistle blowing as a mechanism to report about the frauds, the present study explores the impact of ethical leadership and leader–member exchange (LMX) on whistle blowing. Additionally, the article also explores the moderating role of the moral intensity [studied as magnitude of consequences (MOC)] of the issue on this relationship. The article reports results of three experimental studies conducted on the postgraduate students of a premier technology institute in India. Ethical (...)
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  27. Is Whistleblowing Wrong?Luciano Floridi - 2011 - The Philosophers' Magazine 53:20-21.
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  28. The Effects of Anticipated Regret on the Whistleblowing Decision.Amy J. Fredin - 2011 - Ethics and Behavior 21 (5):404 - 427.
    This article incorporates two emotion-based psychology theories into the study of whistleblowing. Particularly, it studies how one's predicted regret may differ when one is cued in to possible regret effects associated with either blowing the whistle or staying silent. Ethical scenarios with two moral intensity levels and two wrongdoing types were manipulated. Analysis of variance results based on subjects' predicted regret scores as well as subjects' descriptions of what the regret would be related to indicate several significant interactions. Findings suggest (...)
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  29. Whistleblowing in a Changing Legal Climate: Is It Time to Revisit Our Approach to Trust and Loyalty at the Workplace?David Lewis - 2011 - Business Ethics: A European Review 20 (1):71-87.
    This article suggests that the introduction of employment protection rights for whistleblowers has implications for the way in which trust and loyalty should be viewed at the workplace. In particular, it is argued that the very existence of legislative provisions in the United Kingdom reinforces the notion that whistleblowing should not be regarded as either deviant or disloyal behaviour. Thus, the internal reporting of concerns can be seen as an act of trust and loyalty in drawing the employer's attention to (...)
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  30. Dissenting Discourse: Exploring Alternatives to the Whistleblowing/Silence Dichotomy. [REVIEW]Hayden Teo & Donella Caspersz - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 104 (2):237-249.
    In recent times, whistleblowing has become one of the most popularly debated issues of business ethics. Popular discussion has coincided with the institutionalisation of whistleblowing via legal and administrative practices, supported by the emergence of academic research in the field. However, the public practice and knowledge that has subsequently developed appears to construct a dichotomy of whistleblowing/silence ; that is, an employee elects either to ‘blow the whistle’ on organisational wrongdoing, or remain silent. We argue that this public transcript of (...)
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  31. Public Interests and Private Passions: A Peculiar Case of Police Whistleblowing.Irena Blonder - 2010 - Criminal Justice Ethics 29 (3):258-277.
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  32. Whistle-Blowing, Moral Integrity, and Organizational Ethics.George G. Brenkert - 2010 - In George G. Brenkert & Tom L. Beauchamp (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Business Ethics. Oxford University Press.
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  33. Whistleblowing in French Corporations: Anatomy of a National Taboo.Gregory Katz & Marc Lenglet - 2010 - Philosophy of Management 9 (1):103-122.
    Denunciations, disclosures and reporting: why do whistleblowing procedures create an ethical dilemma in French corporations? Since July 2006, the requirement that foreign multinationals listed on the New York Stock Exchange implement this practice has been met with stiff resistance in many French companies. French labor unions see this controversy as a clash between the French and Anglo-Saxon models of transparency. To understand the moral reticence of French companies towards whistleblowing, we investigate five distinct perspectives: legal, economic, historical, philosophical and sociological. (...)
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  34. An Examination of the Layers of Workplace Influences in Ethical Judgments: Whistleblowing Likelihood and Perseverance in Public Accounting.Eileen Z. Taylor & Mary B. Curtis - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 93 (1):21-37.
    We employ a Layers of Workplace Influence theory to guide our study of whistleblowing among public accounting audit seniors. Specifically, we examine professional commitment, organizational commitment versus colleague commitment (locus of commitment), and moral intensity of the unethical behavior on two measures of reporting intentions: likelihood of reporting and perseverance in reporting. We find that moral intensity relates to both reporting intention measures. In addition, while high levels of professional identity increase the likelihood that an auditor will initially report an (...)
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  35. Risky Rescues and the Duty to Blow the Whistle.Wim Vandekerckhove & Eva E. Tsahuridu - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (3):365 - 380.
    This article argues that whilst the idea of whistleblowing as a positive duty to do good or to prevent harm may be defendable, legislating that duty is not feasible. We develop our argument by identifying rights and duties involved in whistleblowing as two clusters: one of justice and one of benevolence. Legislative arguments have evolved to cover the justice issues and the tendency exists of extending rights and duties into the realm of benevolence. This article considers the problematic assumptions and (...)
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  36. Forever Blowing Bubbles.Mike Fuller - 2009 - Philosophy Now 73:22-23.
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  37. The Impact of Moral Reasoning and Retaliation on Whistle-Blowing: New Zealand Evidence.Gregory Liyanarachchi & Chris Newdick - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (1):37-57.
    This study examined experimentally the effect of retaliation strength and accounting students’ level of moral reasoning, on their propensity to blow the whistle (PBW) when faced with a serious wrongdoing. Fifty-one senior accounting students enrolled in an auditing course offered by a large New Zealand university participated in the study. Participants responded to three hypothetical whistle-blowing scenarios and completed an instrument that measured moral reasoning (Welton et al., 1994, Accounting Education . International Journal (Toronto, Ont.) 3 (1), 35–50) on one (...)
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  38. Keeping Democracy Vibrant: Whistleblowing as Truth‐Telling in the Workplace.Abraham Mansbach - 2009 - Constellations 16 (3):363-376.
  39. Whistleblowing as Planned Behavior – A Survey of South Korean Police Officers.Heungsik Park & John Blenkinsopp - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (4):545-556.
    This article explores the relevance of the Theory of Planned Behavior to whistleblowing research, and considers whether its widely tested validity as a model of the link between attitudes, intention, and behavior might make it an appropriate candidate for a general theory to account for whistleblowing. This proposition is developed through an empirical test of the theory's predictive validity for whistleblowing intentions. Using a sample of 296 Korean police officers, the analysis showed that attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control (...)
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  40. When the Whistle Is Blown.Donna Peeples - 2009 - Business and Society 48 (4):467-488.
    The recent U.S. Supreme Court opinion in Garcetti v. Ceballos decided that public employees are not necessarily protected under the law if they make statements about alleged improprieties committed by their employers, and can in fact be disciplined for such disclosures. The controversy over this case, combined with the recent publicity surrounding whistle-blower actions, indicates that many people may have incorrect impressions regarding the law in this area. This article focuses on various unsuccessful whistle-blower cases to educate both employers and (...)
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  41. Whistle-Blowing Among Young Employees: A Life-Course Perspective.Jason M. Stansbury & Bart Victor - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (3):281-299.
    The 2003 National Business Ethics Survey, conducted by the Ethics Resource Center, found that respondents who were both young and had short organizational tenure were substantially less likely than other respondents to report misconduct that they observed in the workplace to an authority. We propose that the life-course model of deviance can help account for this attenuation of acquiescence in misbehavior. As employees learn to perceive informal prosocial control during their socialization into the workforce, we hypothesize that they will become (...)
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  42. Making Sense of Whistle-Blowing’s Antecedents: Learning From Research on Identity and Ethics Programs.Abhijeet K. Vadera, Ruth V. Aguilera & Brianna B. Caza - 2009 - Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (4):553-586.
    Despite a significant increase in whistle-blowing practices in work organizations, we know little about what differentiates whistle-blowers from those who observe a wrongdoing but chose not to report it. In this review article, we first highlight the arenas inwhich research on whistle-blowing has produced inconsistent results and those in which the findings have been consistent. Second, we propose that the adoption of an identity approach will help clarify the inconsistent findings and extend prior work on individual-level motives behind whistle-blowing. Third, (...)
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  43. Is Whistle-Blowing Compatible with Employee Loyalty?Jukka Varelius - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (2):263-275.
    Whistle-blowing would appear to involve a conflict between employee loyalty and protection of public interest. Several business ethicists have, however, argued that this conflict is indeed merely apparent. According to the central argument to that effect, when the nature of employee loyalty is understood correctly, it becomes clear that whistle-blowing does not threaten employees' loyalty to their employer. This is because blowing the whistle about one's employer's wrongdoing and being loyal to them serves the same goal, the moral good of (...)
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  44. Decision-Making Process of Internal Whistleblowing Behavior in China: Empirical Evidence and Implications.Julia Zhang, Randy Chiu & Liqun Wei - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S1):25-41.
    In response to the lack of empirical studies examining the internal disclosure behavior in the Chinese context, this study tested a whistleblowing -decision-making process among employees in the Chinese banking industry. For would-be whistleblowers, positive affect and organizational ethical culture were hypothesized to enhance the expected efficacy of their whistleblowing intention, by providing collective norms concerning legitimate, management-sanctioned behavior. Questionnaire surveys were collected from 364 employees in 10 banks in the Hangzhou City, China. By and large, the findings supported the (...)
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  45. Whistle-Blowing and Morality.Mathieu Bouville - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (3):579-585.
    Whistle-blowing is generally considered from the viewpoint of professional morality. Morality rejects the idea of choice and the interests of the professional as immoral. Yet the dreadful retaliations against the messengers of the truth make it necessary for morality to leave a way out of whistle-blowing. This is why it forges rights (sometimes called duties) to trump the duty to the public prescribed by professional codes. This serves to hide the obvious fact that whether to blow the whistle is indeed (...)
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  46. Whistle-Blowing for Profit: An Ethical Analysis of the Federal False Claims Act.Thomas L. Carson, Mary Ellen Verdu & Richard E. Wokutch - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 77 (3):361 - 376.
    This paper focuses on the 1986 Amendments to the False Claims Act of 1863, which offers whistle-blowers financial rewards for disclosing fraud committed against the U.S. government. This law provides an opportunity to examine underlying assumptions about the morality of whistle-blowing and to consider the merits of increased reliance on whistle-blowing to protect the public interest. The law seems open to a number of moral objections, most notably that it exerts a morally corrupting influence on whistle-blowers. We answer these objections (...)
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  47. Mad as Hell or Scared Stiff? The Effects of Value Conflict and Emotions on Potential Whistle-Blowers.Erika Henik - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (1):111-119.
    Existing whistle-blowing models rely on “cold” economic calculations and cost-benefit analyses to explain the judgments and actions of potential whistle-blowers. I argue that “hot” cognitions – value conflict and emotions – should be added to these models. I propose a model of the whistle-blowing decision process that highlights the reciprocal influence of “hot” and “cold” cognitions and advocate research that explores how value conflict and emotions inform reporting decisions. I draw on the cognitive appraisal approach to emotions and on the (...)
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  48. Self-Efficacy as an Intrapersonal Predictor for Internal Whistleblowing: A US and Canada Examination.Brent R. MacNab & Reginald Worthley - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 79 (4):407-421.
    Examining intrapersonal factors theorized to influence ethics reporting decisions, the relation of self-efficacy as a predictor of propensity for internal whistleblowing is investigated within a US and Canadian multi-regional context. Over 900 professionals from a total of nine regions in Canada and the US participated. Self-efficacy was found to influence participant reported propensity for internal whistleblowing consistently in both the US and Canada. Seasoned participants with greater management and work experience demonstrated higher levels of self-efficacy while gender was also found (...)
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  49. Cultural Orientation and Attitudes Toward Different Forms of Whistleblowing: A Comparison of South Korea, Turkey, and the U.K. [REVIEW]Heungsik Park, John Blenkinsopp, M. Kemal Oktem & Ugur Omurgonulsen - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (4):929 - 939.
    This article reports the findings of a cross-cultural study that explored the relationship between nationality, cultural orientation, and attitudes toward different ways in which an employee might blow the whistle. The study investigated two questions – are there any significant differences in the attitudes of university students from South Korea, Turkey and the U.K. toward various ways by which an employee blows the whistle in an organization?, and what effect, if any, does cultural orientation have on these attitudes? In order (...)
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  50. Whistleblowing by Students in Practice Learning Settings: The Student Perspective.Sharon Rodie - 2008 - Ethics and Social Welfare 2 (1):95-99.
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