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  1. added 2020-02-28
    Leave Only Footprints? Reframing Climate Change, Environmental Stewardship, and Human Impact.Monica Aufrecht - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):84-102.
    Cheryl Hall has argued that framing of climate change must acknowledge the sacrifices needed to reach a sustainable future. This paper builds on that argument. Although it is important to acknowledge the value of what must be sacrificed, this paper argues that current frames about the environment falsely portray humans and the environment as in a zero-sum game, and in doing so ask people to give up the wrong things. This could undermine the public’s trust in environmentalism, and might even (...)
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  2. added 2019-10-14
    Pervasive Captivity and Urban Wildlife.Nicolas Delon - forthcoming - Ethics, Policy and Environment.
    Urban animals can benefit from living in cities, but this also makes them vulnerable as they increasingly depend on the advantages of urban life. This article has two aims. First, I provide a detailed analysis of the concept of captivity and explain why it matters to nonhuman animals—because and insofar as many of them have a (non-substitutable) interest in freedom. Second, I defend a surprising implication of the account—pushing the boundaries of the concept while the boundaries of cities and human (...)
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  3. added 2019-07-05
    Екокритичний аспект дикості у поетичному циклі Олега Лишеги «Снігові і вогню».Tetiana Hanzha - 2018 - NaUKMA Researh Papers. Literary Studies 1:62-65.
    У статті проаналізовано категорію дикості в поезії Олега Лишеги. Екокритична категорія дикості – як протилежність до цивілізованого, обжитого, людського – дає змогу окреслити основні ознаки лісу у поезії Лишеги як дикого, непередбачуваного, тваринного, магічного простору. Близька взаємодія суб’єкта лірики із лісовим ландшафтом створює глибшу ідентичність дикого лісу, який, отримавши голос, промовляє у тексті. Надзвичайно важливим для поета є збереження неприрученості, гармонійне співіснування світу природи і світу людей.
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  4. added 2019-06-06
    The Wilderness Debate Rages On: Continuing the Great New Wilderness Debate. [REVIEW]Scott Friskics - 2010 - Environmental Ethics 32 (1):85-90.
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  5. added 2019-06-06
    The Wilderness Debate Rages On: Continuing the Great New Wilderness Debate. [REVIEW]Mark Woods - 2010 - Teaching Philosophy 33 (1):113-121.
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  6. added 2019-06-06
    The Twofold Myth of Pristine Wilderness: Misreading the Wilderness Act in Terms of Purity.Scott Friskics - 2008 - Environmental Ethics 30 (4):381-399.
    In recent years, the notion of wilderness has been roundly criticized by several prominent environmental philosophers and historians. They argue that the “received wilderness idea” is dualistic, ethnocentric, and static. According to these critics, this idea of wilderness finds clear expression in the Wilderness Act of 1964. However, the idea of wilderness so ably deconstructed by its critics bears little resemblance to the understanding of wilderness presented in the Wilderness Act. The critics assume a backward-looking, purity-based definition of wilderness that (...)
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  7. added 2019-06-06
    Wilderness in the City: Not Such a Long Drive After All.W. S. K. Cameron - 2006 - Environmental Philosophy 3 (2):28-33.
    Over the last few years, the concept of “wilderness” has come under attack by environmentalists deeply committed to sustaining the natural world. Their criticisms are pointed and undeniably strong; moreover as I will argue, very similar critiques could be made of its putative counter-concept, “the city.” Yet in both cases, we need not simply reject the concepts themselves as incoherent; our challenge is rather to develop resources rich enough to show that and why they must stand in a constructive tension. (...)
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  8. added 2019-06-06
    Wilderness Management and Geospatial Technology: A View From the Black Forest.Dennis Skocz - 2005 - Environmental Philosophy 2 (2):53-60.
    The paper uses Heideggerian concepts of world to contrast the lived environment of the animal in the wild to nature as [re]constructed through Geographical Information Systems. With the animal Umwelt and GIS Weltbilt/Ge-stell side by side, we can see the “contradiction” between the animal’s lived space and the techno-human space of GIS, appreciate the risk of the GIS-constructed world to animals in the wild, and seek a way to address the risk. The paper suggests that humans, as beings which properly (...)
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  9. added 2019-06-06
    What is Africa to Me?: Wilderness in Black Thought From 1860 to 1930.Kimberly K. Smith - 2005 - Environmental Ethics 27 (3):279-297.
    The concept of wilderness found in the black American intellectual tradition poses a provocative alternative to the preservationist concept. For black writers, the wilderness is not radically separate from human society but has an important historical and social dimension. Nor is it merely a feature of the external landscape; there is also a wilderness within, a vital energy that derives from and connects one to the external wilderness. Wilderness is the origin and foundation of culture; preserving it means preserving not (...)
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  10. added 2019-06-06
    Wilderness and the Sacred: The Meeting of Spirit and Nature in Human Experience.Bruce Martin - 2004 - Environmental Philosophy 1 (1):79-83.
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  11. added 2019-06-06
    The World and the Wild: Expanding Wilderness Conservation Beyond its American Roots. [REVIEW]Michael P. Nelson - 2004 - Environmental Ethics 26 (1):107-110.
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  12. added 2019-06-06
    Rethinking Wilderness: The Need for a New Idea of Wilderness.Michael P. Nelson - 1996 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 3 (2):6-9.
    The “received” concept of wilderness as a place apart from and untouched by humans is five-times flawed: it is not universalizable, it is ethnocentric, it is ecologically naive, it separates humans from nature, and its referent is nonexistent. The received view of wilderness leads to dilemmas and unpalatable consequences, including the loss of designated wilderness areas by political and legislative authorities. What is needed is a more flexible notion of wilderness. Suggestions are made for a revised concept of wilderness.
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  13. added 2019-06-06
    Out of the Wilderness: Douglas Clyde Macintosh's Journeys Through the Grounds and Claims of Modern Thought Preston Warren New York, Bern and Frankfurt-Am-Main: Peter Lang, 1989, Xvi + 284 Pp. $39.50. [REVIEW]Joseph P. Fell - 1996 - Dialogue 35 (3):628-631.
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  14. added 2019-06-06
    The Original Desert Solitaire: Early Christian Monasticism and Wilderness.Susan Power Bratton - 1988 - Environmental Ethics 10 (1):31-53.
    Roderick Nash’s conc1usion in Wilderness and the American Mind that St. Francis “stood alone in a posture of humility and respect before the natural world” is not supported by thorough analysis of monastic literature. Rather St. Francis stands at the end of a thousand-year monastic tradition. Investigation of the “histories” and sayings of the desert fathers produces frequent references to the environment, particularly to wildlife. In stories about lions, wolves, antelopes, and other animals, the monks sometimes exercise spiritual powers over (...)
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  15. added 2019-06-06
    Michael P. Cohen: The Pathless Way: John Muir and American Wilderness. [REVIEW]Donald Worster - 1988 - Environmental Ethics 10 (3):267-270.
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  16. added 2019-06-05
    Book Review: Wilderness Wanderings: Probing Twentieth-Century Theology and PhilosophyWilderness Wanderings: Probing Twentieth-Century Theology and Philosophy, byHauerwasStanley. Westview, Boulder, 1997. 242pp. $28.00. ISBN 0-8133-3349-0. [REVIEW]Gloria H. Albrecht - 1999 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 53 (2):208-210.
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  17. added 2019-06-05
    Book Reviews : Wilderness Wanderings: Probing Twentieth-Century Theology and Philosophy, by Stanley M. Hauerwas. Boulder, Colo. And Oxford: Westview Press, 1997. 242 Pp. Hb. £21.50. ISBN 0-8133-3349-0. [REVIEW]Gabriel Vahanian - 1999 - Studies in Christian Ethics 12 (2):126-130.
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  18. added 2019-04-19
    Environmental Heritage and the Ruins of the Future.Erich Hatala Matthes - 2019 - In Carolyn Korsmeyer, Jeanette Bicknell & Jennifer Judkins (eds.), Philosophical Perspectives on Ruins, Monuments, and Memorials. Routledge.
    We now have good reason to worry that many coastal cities will be flooded by the end of the century. How should we confront this possibility (or inevitability)? What attitudes should we adopt to impending inundation of such magnitude? In the case of place-loss due to anthropogenic climate change, I argue that there may ultimately be something fitting about letting go, both thinking prospectively, when the likelihood of preservation is bleak, and retrospectively, when we reflect on our inability to prevent (...)
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  19. added 2019-03-07
    Rewilding in Cultural Layered Landscapes.Martin Drenthen - 2018 - Environmental Values 27 (4):325-330.
    introduction to the theme issue of Environmental Values on Rewilding in cultural layered landscapes. Rewilding projects, especially in culturally saturated landscapes, are often being opposed by those who deeply care about the old cultural landscapes (for cultural or ecological reasons). Indeed, some proponents of rewilding today fall back on the language that was developed by the early proponents of wilderness preservation, starting off from an opposition between wild nature and culture, and claiming that nature needs to be protected against human (...)
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  20. added 2019-03-07
    Rewilding in Layered Landscapes as a Challenge to Place Identity.Martin Drenthen - 2018 - Environmental Values 27 (4):405-425.
    Rewilding is an increasingly popular strategy in landscape management, yet it is also controversial, especially when applied in culturally 'layered' landscapes. In this paper I examine what is morally at stake in debates between proponents of rewilding and those that see traditional cultural landscapes as worthy of protection. I will argue that rewilding should not only be understood as a conservation practice, but that we also need to understand its hermeneutic aspect. Rewilding implies a radical non-anthropocentric normative reinterpretation of landscape (...)
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  21. added 2019-03-07
    Landscapes Devoid of Meaning? A Reply to Note.Martin Drenthen - 2013 - Environmental Values 22 (1):17-23.
    Even though artists and philosophers sometimes succeed in finding words for the meaning that places can have for us, we can never fully identify the meaning that places have for us. Nicole Note is right in arguing (using the work of Arnold Burms) that the ineffable plays a key role in the meaningful relations we have with the world, and that the experience of meaning can only emerge if there is a real risk that it fails to appear. Therefore, meaning (...)
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  22. added 2019-01-30
    Book Review: In the Wilderness: The Doctrine of Defilement in the Book of Numbers. [REVIEW]Jacob Neusner - 1995 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 49 (3):305-306.
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  23. added 2019-01-09
    Why Rewilding is Crucial for Human Health.Jan Deckers - 2018 - Diametros 56:142-150.
    Review of the book Feral: Rewilding the Land, Sea, and Human Life by George Monbiot, Penguin Books, London 2014.
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  24. added 2018-09-18
    Should We Help Wild Animals Suffering Negative Impacts From Climate Change?Clare Alexandra Palmer - 2018 - In Svenja Springer & Herwig Grimm (eds.), Professionals in food chains. Wageningen Academic Publishers. pp. 35-40.
    Should we help wild animals suffering negative impacts from anthropogenic climate change? It follows from diverse ethical positions that we should, although this idea troubles defenders of wildness value. One already existing climate threat to wild animals, especially in the Arctic, is the disruption of food chains. I take polar bears as my example here: Should we help starving polar bears? If so, how? A recent scientific paper suggests that as bears’ food access worsens due to a changing climate, we (...)
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  25. added 2018-05-02
    Ethical Arguments For and Against De-Extinction.Douglas Ian Campbell & Patrick Michael Whittle - 2017 - In Resurrecting Extinct Species Ethics and Authenticity. Cham: Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 87-124.
    This chapter surveys and critically evaluates all the main arguments both for and against de-extinction. It presents a qualified defence of the claim that conservationists should embrace de-extinction. It ends with a list of do’s and don’ts for conservationist de-extinction projects.
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  26. added 2018-02-13
    Wild Animal Suffering is Intractable.Nicolas Delon & Duncan Purves - 2018 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 31 (2):239-260.
    Most people believe that suffering is intrinsically bad. In conjunction with facts about our world and plausible moral principles, this yields a pro tanto obligation to reduce suffering. This is the intuitive starting point for the moral argument in favor of interventions to prevent wild animal suffering. If we accept the moral principle that we ought, pro tanto, to reduce the suffering of all sentient creatures, and we recognize the prevalence of suffering in the wild, then we seem committed to (...)
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  27. added 2018-02-11
    Humans Should Not Colonize Mars.Ian Stoner - 2017 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 3 (3):334-353.
    This article offers two arguments for the conclusion that we should refuse on moral grounds to establish a human presence on the surface of Mars. The first argument appeals to a principle constraining the use of invasive or destructive techniques of scientific investigation. The second appeals to a principle governing appropriate human behavior in wilderness. These arguments are prefaced by two preliminary sections. The first preliminary section argues that authors working in space ethics have good reason to shift their focus (...)
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  28. added 2017-10-17
    Book Review: Environmental Ethics: From Theory to Practice. [REVIEW]Kian Mintz-Woo - 2015 - Ethical Perspectives 22 (4):732-735.
    Book review of "Marion Hourdequin. Environmental Ethics: From Theory to Practice. London: Bloomsbury, 2015. 256 pp.".
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  29. added 2017-06-13
    Unsere Sehnsucht nach Natur liegt in unserer Kultur.Thomas Kirchhoff - 2016 - Impu!Se 93 (4):3-4.
    Sehnsucht nach Natur ist in unserer Gesellschaft weit verbreitet. Wandern und Wildniscamps sind aktuelle Beispiele dafür. Die zahlreichen Naturfilme und Inszenierungen von Natur in der Werbung sind klare Indizien ihrer gesellschaftlichen Wertschätzung. Wie ist diese Wertschätzung von und Sehnsucht nach Natur zu erklären?
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  30. added 2017-05-23
    Vieldeutige Natur. Landschaft, Wildnis und Ökosystem als kulturgeschichtliche Phänomene.Thomas Kirchhoff & Ludwig Trepl (eds.) - 2009 - Bielefeld: transcript.
    Natur erleben wir als etwas Gegebenes – und doch ist sie eine Projektion kultureller Ideen und gesellschaftlicher Ideale. So ist sie nicht nur ökologisches System, sondern auch vieldeutiges Symbol: ›locus amoenus‹ und ›locus terribilis‹, einerseits Wildnis und andererseits grandiose, heimatliche, heroische, idyllische Landschaft. Facettenreich und inspirierend stellen die Analysen zu verschiedenen Epochen und Kulturen (Deutschland, England, Frankreich, Holland, Italien, Ungarn, USA, China) die »Natur«-Zugänge unterschiedlicher Disziplinen vor.
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  31. added 2017-05-10
    Naturphilosophie. Ein Lehr- Und Studienbuch.Thomas Kirchhoff, Nicole C. Karafyllis, Dirk Evers, Brigitte Falkenburg, Myriam Gerhard, Gerald Hartung, Jürgen Hübner, Kristian Köchy, Ulrich Krohs, Thomas Potthast, Otto Schäfer, Gregor Schiemann, Magnus Schlette, Reinhard Schulz & Frank Vogelsang (eds.) - 2017 - Tübingen, Germany: Mohr Siebeck / UTB.
    Was ist Natur oder was könnte sie sein? Diese und weitere Fragen sind grundlegend für Naturdenken und -handeln. Das Lehr- und Studienbuch bietet eine historisch-systematische und zugleich praxisbezogene Einführung in die Naturphilosophie mit ihren wichtigsten Begriffen. Es nimmt den pluralen Charakter der Wahrnehmung von Natur in den philosophischen Blick und ist auch zum Selbststudium bestens geeignet.
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  32. added 2017-05-10
    'Natur' als kulturelles Konzept.Thomas Kirchhoff - 2011 - Zeitschrift für Kulturphilosophie 5 (1):69–96.
    Nature is treated as a reality that is constituted by intersubjective cultural patterns of interpretation. Views of nature are interpreted as reflexions of cultural objectivity. By the example of nature as landscape and nature as wilderness, it is shown that even concrete nature appearing to be directly present has been culturally constituted. By the example of ecology, it becomes clear that cultural ideas direct not only aesthetic and moral but also theoretical judgements of nature. -/- Natur wird thematisiert als Realität, (...)
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  33. added 2017-03-09
    Fatal Attraction: Wildness in Contemporary Film.Martin Drenthen - 2009 - Environmental Ethics 31 (3):297-315.
    The concept of wildness not only plays a role in philosophical debates, but also in popular culture. Wild nature is often seen as a place outside the cultural sphere where one can still encounter instances of transcendence. Some writers and moviemakers contest the dominant romanticized view of wild nature by telling stories that somehow show a different harsher face of nature. In encounters with the wild and unruly, humans can sometimes experience the misfit between their well-ordered, human-centered, self-created world view (...)
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  34. added 2017-03-09
    Nietzsche and the Paradox of Environmental Ethics: Nietzsche’s View of Nature and Morality.Martin Drenthen - 2002 - New Nietzsche Studies 5 (1/2):12-25.
    In this paper, I offer a systematic inquiry into the significance of Nietzsche’s philosophy to environmental ethics. Nietzsche’s philosophy of nature is, I believe, relevant today because it makes explicit a fundamental ambiguity that is also characteristic for our current understanding of nature. I will show how the current debate between traditional environmental ethics and postmodern environmental philosophy can be interpreted as a symptom of this ambiguity. I argue that, in light of Nietzsche’s critique of morality, environmental ethics is a (...)
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  35. added 2017-03-09
    The Paradox of Environmental Ethics: Nietzsche’s View of Nature and the Wild.Martin Drenthen - 1999 - Environmental Ethics 21 (2):163-175.
    In this paper, I offer a systematic inquiry into the significance of Nietzsche’s philosophy to environmental ethics. Nietzsche’s philosophy of nature is, I believe, relevant today because it makes explicit a fundamental ambiguity that is also characteristic of our current understanding of nature. I show how the current debate between traditional environmental ethics and postmodern environmental philosophycan be interpreted as a symptom of this ambiguity. I argue that, in light of Nietzsche’s critique of morality, environmental ethics is a highly paradoxical (...)
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  36. added 2017-02-15
    Deceptive Beauties: The World of Wild Orchids.Christian Ziegler, Michael Pollan & Natalie Angier - 2011 - University of Chicago Press.
    This astonishing book features over 150 unprecedented color photographs taken by Christian Ziegler himself as he trekked through wilderness on five continents to capture the diversity and magnificence of orchids in their natural habitats.
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  37. added 2017-02-14
    10 Garden, City, or Wilderness? Landscape and Destiny in the Christian Imagination.Philip Sheldrake - 2011 - In Jeff Malpas (ed.), The Place of Landscape: Concepts, Contexts, Studies. MIT Press. pp. 183.
    This chapter focuses on the important role played by landscape in the Christian religious imagination. It argues for the ambiguity of “landscape” in the sense that locales like forests, fields, and mountains are both geographic realities and imaginary realities. Many locales are considered powerful symbols of fear or desire. According to Simon Schama’s Landscape and Memory, “Landscapes are culture before they are nature; constructs of the imagination projected onto wood and water and rock.” This means that landscape is irreducibly historical (...)
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  38. added 2017-02-14
    J. Baird Callicott and Michael P. Nelson (Eds), The Great New Wilderness Debate.W. Throop - 2000 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 3:338-340.
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  39. added 2017-02-12
    What is a "Jewish Dog"? Konrad Lorenz and the Cult of Wildness.Boria Sax - 1997 - Society and Animals 5 (1):3-21.
    This paper explores the Nazi view of nature as violent but orderly, contrasted with what the Nazis took to be the chaos and confusion of human society. In imposing strict authoritarian controls, the Nazis strove to emulate what they viewed as the natural discipline of instinct. They saw this as embodied in wild animals, especially large predators such as wolves, while the opposite were domesticated mongrels whose instincts, like those of overly civilized peoples, had been ruined through careless breeding. Those (...)
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  40. added 2017-02-11
    Does the Idea of Wilderness Need a Defence?Paul M. Keeling - 2008 - Environmental Values 17 (4):505-519.
    The received wilderness idea of nature as untrammelled by human beings has been accused of assuming an untenable human/nature dualism which denies the Darwinian fact that humans are a part of nature. But the meaning of terms like 'nature' and 'natural' depends on the context of use and the contrast class implied in that context. When philosophers such as J. Baird Callicott and Steven Vogel insist that the only correct view is that humans are a part of nature, they ignore (...)
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  41. added 2017-02-10
    What is the Value of Historical Fidelity in Restoration?Justin Garson - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 45 (1):97-100.
    The following considers the role of historical fidelity in habitat reconstruction efforts. To what extent should habitat reconstruction be guided by the goal of recreating some past state of a damaged ecosystem? I consider Sarkar’s “replacement argument,” which holds that, in most habitat reconstruction efforts, there is little justification for appealing to historical fidelity. I argue that Sarkar does not provide adequate grounds for deprecating historical fidelity relative to other natural values such as biodiversity or wild nature.
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  42. added 2017-01-29
    Rethinking Wilderness.Mark Woods - 1997 - Dissertation, University of Colorado at Boulder
    Wilderness preservation is an important issue within the field of environmental ethics. In recent years wilderness has come under attack from people in a variety of different fields. These attacks would lead us to believe that wilderness as a concept is fatally flawed and that the practice of wilderness preservation is misguided. I examine some of the more important criticisms of wilderness coming from environmental philosophy, ecology, and environmental history. The legal-political practice of wilderness preservation reveals paradoxes about how wilderness (...)
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  43. added 2017-01-29
    Arctic Wilderness the 5th World Wilderness Congress.Vance Martin & Nicholas Tyler - 1995
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  44. added 2017-01-29
    The Way and the Wilderness.Kenneth Robinson - 1993
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  45. added 2017-01-29
    Wilderness Tapestry an Eclectic Approach to Preservation.William H. Mcvaugh, L. Mikel Vause & Samuel I. Zeveloff - 1992
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  46. added 2017-01-29
    Writing the Wilderness: A Study of Henry Thoreau, John Muir, and Mary Austin.Albert Brantley Harwell - 1992 - Dissertation, The University of Tennessee
    This study of the writings of Henry Thoreau, John Muir, and Mary Austin focuses on the various paradigms they explored as they developed theories about humankind's relationship to wilderness. Thoreau evolved over the course of his three trips to Maine in 1846, 1853, and 1857 from a destructive pioneer understanding of wilderness towards a biocentric and Native American understanding of wilderness as home, though he never completely understood a Native American mindset and never found a paradigm that enabled him to (...)
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  47. added 2017-01-28
    Drawing Lines in the Forest: Creating Wilderness Areas in the Pacific Northwest.Kevin R. Marsh - 2008 - Journal of the History of Biology 41 (2):406-408.
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  48. added 2017-01-28
    Constantine Samuel Rafinesque: A Voice in the American Wilderness.Leonard Warren - 2005 - Journal of the History of Biology 38 (3):647-648.
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  49. added 2017-01-28
    Claimed Identities, Personal Projects, and Relationship to Place: A Hermeneutic Interpretation of the Backcountry/Wilderness Experience at Rocky Mountain National Park.Jeffrey J. Brooks - 2003 - Dissertation, Colorado State University
    Captured in narrative textual form through open-ended and tape-recorded interview conversations, visitor experience was interpreted to construct a description of visitors' relationships to place while at the same time providing insights for those who manage the national park. Humans are conceived of as meaning-makers, and outdoor recreation is viewed as emergent experience that can enrich peoples' lives rather than a predictable outcome of processing information encountered in the setting. This process-oriented approach positions subjective well-being and positive experience in the ongoing (...)
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  50. added 2017-01-28
    Red Passion and Patience in the Desert.Terry Tempest Williams - 2001
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1 — 50 / 186