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  1. A Critique of and an Alternative to the Wilderness Idea.J. Baird Callicott - forthcoming - Environmental Ethics, A. Light and H. Rolston (Eds), Blackwell Publishing, Oxford.
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  2. 47 The Trouble With Wilderness.William Cronon - forthcoming - Environmental Ethics: The Big Questions.
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  3. Animal Capabilities and Freedom in the City.Nicolas Delon - forthcoming - Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.
    Animals who live in cities must coexist with us. They are, as a result, entitled to the conditions of their flourishing. This article argues that, as the boundaries of cities and urban areas expand, the boundaries of our conception of captivity should expand too. Urbanization can undermine animals’ freedoms, hence their ability to live good lives. I draw the implications of an account of “pervasive captivity” against the background of the Capabilities Approach. I construe captivity, including that of urban animals, (...)
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  4. Consequentialism and Nonhuman Animals.Tyler John & Jeff Sebo - forthcoming - In Douglas W. Portmore (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Consequentialism. New York, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 564-591.
    Consequentialism is thought to be in significant conflict with animal rights theory because it does not regard activities such as confinement, killing, and exploitation as in principle morally wrong. Proponents of the “Logic of the Larder” argue that consequentialism results in an implausibly pro-exploitation stance, permitting us to eat farmed animals with positive well- being to ensure future such animals exist. Proponents of the “Logic of the Logger” argue that consequentialism results in an implausibly anti-conservationist stance, permitting us to exterminate (...)
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  5. Pervasive Captivity and Urban Wildlife.Nicolas Delon - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (2):123-143.
    Urban animals can benefit from living in cities, but this also makes them vulnerable as they increasingly depend on the advantages of urban life. This article has two aims. First, I provide a detailed analysis of the concept of captivity and explain why it matters to nonhuman animals—because and insofar as many of them have a (non-substitutable) interest in freedom. Second, I defend a surprising implication of the account—pushing the boundaries of the concept while the boundaries of cities and human (...)
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  6. Not Everything is a Contest: Sport, Nature Sport, and Friluftsliv.Leslie A. Howe - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (3):437-453.
    Two prevalent assumptions in the philosophy of sport literature are that all sports are games and that all games are contests, meant to determine who is the better at the skills definitive of the sport. If these are correct, it would follow that all sports are contests and that a range of sporting activities, including nature sports, are not in fact sports at all. This paper first confronts the notion that sport and games must seek to resolve skill superiority through (...)
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  7. Environmental Heritage and the Ruins of the Future.Erich Hatala Matthes - 2019 - In Carolyn Korsmeyer, Jeanette Bicknell & Jennifer Judkins (eds.), Philosophical Perspectives on Ruins, Monuments, and Memorials. Routledge.
    We now have good reason to worry that many coastal cities will be flooded by the end of the century. How should we confront this possibility (or inevitability)? What attitudes should we adopt to impending inundation of such magnitude? In the case of place-loss due to anthropogenic climate change, I argue that there may ultimately be something fitting about letting go, both thinking prospectively, when the likelihood of preservation is bleak, and retrospectively, when we reflect on our inability to prevent (...)
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  8. "Mujer" y "naturaleza" en el pensamiento griego antiguo.Aida Míguez Barciela - 2019 - In Género y mujeres en el mediterráneo antiguo.
  9. Why Rewilding is Crucial for Human Health.Jan Deckers - 2018 - Diametros 56:142-150.
    Review of the book Feral: Rewilding the Land, Sea, and Human Life by George Monbiot, Penguin Books, London 2014.
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  10. Wild Animal Suffering is Intractable.Nicolas Delon & Duncan Purves - 2018 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 31 (2):239-260.
    Most people believe that suffering is intrinsically bad. In conjunction with facts about our world and plausible moral principles, this yields a pro tanto obligation to reduce suffering. This is the intuitive starting point for the moral argument in favor of interventions to prevent wild animal suffering. If we accept the moral principle that we ought, pro tanto, to reduce the suffering of all sentient creatures, and we recognize the prevalence of suffering in the wild, then we seem committed to (...)
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  11. Rewilding in Cultural Layered Landscapes.Martin Drenthen - 2018 - Environmental Values 27 (4):325-330.
    introduction to the theme issue of Environmental Values on Rewilding in cultural layered landscapes. Rewilding projects, especially in culturally saturated landscapes, are often being opposed by those who deeply care about the old cultural landscapes (for cultural or ecological reasons). Indeed, some proponents of rewilding today fall back on the language that was developed by the early proponents of wilderness preservation, starting off from an opposition between wild nature and culture, and claiming that nature needs to be protected against human (...)
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  12. Rewilding in Layered Landscapes as a Challenge to Place Identity.Martin Drenthen - 2018 - Environmental Values 27 (4):405-425.
    Rewilding is an increasingly popular strategy in landscape management, yet it is also controversial, especially when applied in culturally 'layered' landscapes. In this paper I examine what is morally at stake in debates between proponents of rewilding and those that see traditional cultural landscapes as worthy of protection. I will argue that rewilding should not only be understood as a conservation practice, but that we also need to understand its hermeneutic aspect. Rewilding implies a radical non-anthropocentric normative reinterpretation of landscape (...)
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  13. Екокритичний аспект дикості у поетичному циклі Олега Лишеги «Снігові і вогню».Tetiana Hanzha - 2018 - NaUKMA Researh Papers. Literary Studies 1:62-65.
    У статті проаналізовано категорію дикості в поезії Олега Лишеги. Екокритична категорія дикості – як протилежність до цивілізованого, обжитого, людського – дає змогу окреслити основні ознаки лісу у поезії Лишеги як дикого, непередбачуваного, тваринного, магічного простору. Близька взаємодія суб’єкта лірики із лісовим ландшафтом створює глибшу ідентичність дикого лісу, який, отримавши голос, промовляє у тексті. Надзвичайно важливим для поета є збереження неприрученості, гармонійне співіснування світу природи і світу людей.
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  14. Should We Help Wild Animals Suffering Negative Impacts From Climate Change?Clare Alexandra Palmer - 2018 - In Svenja Springer & Herwig Grimm (eds.), Professionals in food chains. Wageningen Academic Publishers. pp. 35-40.
    Should we help wild animals suffering negative impacts from anthropogenic climate change? It follows from diverse ethical positions that we should, although this idea troubles defenders of wildness value. One already existing climate threat to wild animals, especially in the Arctic, is the disruption of food chains. I take polar bears as my example here: Should we help starving polar bears? If so, how? A recent scientific paper suggests that as bears’ food access worsens due to a changing climate, we (...)
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  15. Leave Only Footprints? Reframing Climate Change, Environmental Stewardship, and Human Impact.Monica Aufrecht - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):84-102.
    Cheryl Hall has argued that framing of climate change must acknowledge the sacrifices needed to reach a sustainable future. This paper builds on that argument. Although it is important to acknowledge the value of what must be sacrificed, this paper argues that current frames about the environment falsely portray humans and the environment as in a zero-sum game, and in doing so ask people to give up the wrong things. This could undermine the public’s trust in environmentalism, and might even (...)
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  16. Ethical Arguments For and Against De-Extinction.Douglas Ian Campbell & Patrick Michael Whittle - 2017 - In Resurrecting Extinct Species Ethics and Authenticity. Cham: Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 87-124.
    This chapter surveys and critically evaluates all the main arguments both for and against de-extinction. It presents a qualified defence of the claim that conservationists should embrace de-extinction. It ends with a list of do’s and don’ts for conservationist de-extinction projects.
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  17. Naturphilosophie. Ein Lehr- Und Studienbuch.Thomas Kirchhoff, Nicole C. Karafyllis, Dirk Evers, Brigitte Falkenburg, Myriam Gerhard, Gerald Hartung, Jürgen Hübner, Kristian Köchy, Ulrich Krohs, Thomas Potthast, Otto Schäfer, Gregor Schiemann, Magnus Schlette, Reinhard Schulz & Frank Vogelsang (eds.) - 2017 - Tübingen, Germany: Mohr Siebeck / UTB.
    Was ist Natur oder was könnte sie sein? Diese und weitere Fragen sind grundlegend für Naturdenken und -handeln. Das Lehr- und Studienbuch bietet eine historisch-systematische und zugleich praxisbezogene Einführung in die Naturphilosophie mit ihren wichtigsten Begriffen. Es nimmt den pluralen Charakter der Wahrnehmung von Natur in den philosophischen Blick und ist auch zum Selbststudium bestens geeignet.
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  18. Humans Should Not Colonize Mars.Ian Stoner - 2017 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 3 (3):334-353.
    This article offers two arguments for the conclusion that we should refuse on moral grounds to establish a human presence on the surface of Mars. The first argument appeals to a principle constraining the use of invasive or destructive techniques of scientific investigation. The second appeals to a principle governing appropriate human behavior in wilderness. These arguments are prefaced by two preliminary sections. The first preliminary section argues that authors working in space ethics have good reason to shift their focus (...)
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  19. Rethinking Wilderness.Mark Woods - 2017 - Broadview Press.
    The concept and values of wilderness, along with the practice of wilderness preservation, have been under attack for the past several decades. In _Rethinking Wilderness_, Mark Woods responds to seven prominent anti-wilderness arguments. Woods offers a rethinking of the received concept of wilderness, developing a positive account of wilderness as a significant location for the other-than-human value-adding properties of naturalness, wildness, and freedom. Interdisciplinary in approach, the book combines environmental philosophy, environmental history, environmental social sciences, the science of ecology, and (...)
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  20. George Wuerthner, Eileen Crist and Tom Butler , Protecting the Wild: Parks and Wilderness, The Foundation for Conservation.Philip Cafaro - 2016 - Environmental Values 25 (6):759-761.
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  21. Unsere Sehnsucht nach Natur liegt in unserer Kultur.Thomas Kirchhoff - 2016 - Impu!Se 93 (4):3-4.
    Sehnsucht nach Natur ist in unserer Gesellschaft weit verbreitet. Wandern und Wildniscamps sind aktuelle Beispiele dafür. Die zahlreichen Naturfilme und Inszenierungen von Natur in der Werbung sind klare Indizien ihrer gesellschaftlichen Wertschätzung. Wie ist diese Wertschätzung von und Sehnsucht nach Natur zu erklären?
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  22. Nonhuman Animals and Sovereignty: On Zoopolis, Failed States and Institutional Relationships with Free-Living Animals.Josh Milburn - 2016 - In Andrew Woodhall & Gabriel Garmendia da Trindade (eds.), Intervention or Protest: Acting for Nonhuman Animals. Wilmington, DE: Vernon Press. pp. 183-212.
    When considering the possibility of intervening in nature to aid suffering nonhuman animals, we can ask about moral philosophy, which concerns the actions of individuals, or about political philosophy, which concerns the apparatus of the state. My focus in this paper is on the latter, and, in particular, the proposal from Sue Donaldson and Will Kymlicka that nonhuman animals should be offered sovereignty rights over their territories. Such rights, among other things, seriously limit the occasions on which we might intervene (...)
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  23. Just Visiting.Raquel Robles - 2016 - Stance 9:17-25.
    This paper argues for retaining the concept of “wilderness” as a significant ethical category and considers arguments by J. Baird Callicott and William Cronon for abandoning it. Counters by Paul M. Keeling and Scott Friskics are evaluated and defended. Lastly, the paper recommends thinking of the term “wilderness” as belonging to a certain range of meanings on a spectrum of naturalness.
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  24. Wilderness Experiences as Ethics: From Elevation to Attentiveness.Elisa Aaltola - 2015 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (3):283-300.
    Wilderness experiences were celebrated by the Great Romantics, and figures such as Wordsworth and Thoreau emphasized the need to seek direct contact with the non-human world. Later deep ecologists accentuated the way in which wilderness experiences can spark moral epiphanies and lead to action on behalf of the natural environment. In recent years, psychological studies have manifested how the observations made by the Romantics, nature authors and deep ecologists apply to laypeople: contact with the wilderness does tend to lead to (...)
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  25. From Wilderness to Ordinary Nature.Rémi Beau - 2015 - Environmental Ethics 37 (4):425-443.
    The wilderness debate that has raged in American environmentalism since the 1990s has led to the valuation of less spectacular forms of nature than wilderness. This increasing interest in ordinary nature brings American environmental thought to an environmental ground more familiar to French ecologists. Although the wilderness idea that has focused on untrammeled places was difficult to integrate into the French philosophical landscape, reaching common ground could foster exchanges between American environmental ethics and French political ecology. More precisely, the renewal (...)
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  26. Review of Joy Porter, Native American Environmentalism: Land, Spirit, and the Idea of Wilderness. [REVIEW]Carissa Beckwith - 2015 - Environmental Values 24 (5):689-691.
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  27. Ecosystems as Spontaneous Orders.Andy Lamey - 2015 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 27 (1):64-88.
    The notion of a spontaneous order has a long history in the philosophy of economics, where it has been used to advance a view of markets as complex networks of information that no single mind can apprehend. Traditionally, the impossibility of grasping all of the information present in the spontaneous order of the market has been invoked as grounds for not subjecting markets to central planning. A less noted feature of the spontaneous order concept is that when it is applied (...)
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  28. Book Review: Environmental Ethics: From Theory to Practice. [REVIEW]Kian Mintz-Woo - 2015 - Ethical Perspectives 22 (4):732-735.
    Book review of "Marion Hourdequin. Environmental Ethics: From Theory to Practice. London: Bloomsbury, 2015. 256 pp.".
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  29. Old and New World Perspectives on Environmental Philosophy. Transatlantic Conversations.Martin Drenthen & Jozef Keulartz (eds.) - 2014 - Springer.
    This is the first collection of essays in which European and American philosophers explicitly think out their respective contributions and identities as environmental thinkers in the analytic and continental traditions. The American/European, as well as Analytic/Continental collaboration here bears fruit helpful for further theorizing and research. The essays group around three well-defined areas of questioning all focusing on the amelioration/management of environmentally, historically and traditionally diminished landscapes. The first part deals with differences between New World and the Old World perspectives (...)
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  30. What is the Value of Historical Fidelity in Restoration?Justin Garson - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 45 (1):97-100.
    The following considers the role of historical fidelity in habitat reconstruction efforts. To what extent should habitat reconstruction be guided by the goal of recreating some past state of a damaged ecosystem? I consider Sarkar’s “replacement argument,” which holds that, in most habitat reconstruction efforts, there is little justification for appealing to historical fidelity. I argue that Sarkar does not provide adequate grounds for deprecating historical fidelity relative to other natural values such as biodiversity or wild nature.
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  31. American Wilderness Philosophy.David Henderson - 2014 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    American Wilderness Philosophy Wilderness has been defined in diverse ways, but most famously in the Wilderness Act of 1964, which describes it “in contrast with those areas where man and his own works dominate the landscape … as an area where the earth and its community of life are untrammeled by man, where man himself is […].
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  32. A Historical and Systematic Survey of European Perceptions of Wilderness.Thomas Kirchhoff & Vera Vicenzotti - 2014 - Environmental Values 23 (4):443-464.
    This paper develops a historical and systematic typology of perceptions of wilderness that exist in contemporary western European cultures. After describing notions of wilderness associated with worldviews that emerged during the Enlightenment period and as a critical response to it, we outline four recent transformations of these traditional notions of wilderness: wilderness as an ecological object, as a place of nature's self-reassertion, as a place of thrill and as a sphere of amorality and meaninglessness. In our conclusion, we suggest what (...)
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  33. “Improving and Embellishing the Wilderness”: Spreading the Gospel of Proper Land Use, New Harmony, Indiana, 1814–1824.Paul J. Ramsey - 2014 - Educational Studies: A Jrnl of the American Educ. Studies Assoc 50 (2):146-166.
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  34. Landscapes Devoid of Meaning? A Reply to Note.Martin Drenthen - 2013 - Environmental Values 22 (1):17-23.
    Even though artists and philosophers sometimes succeed in finding words for the meaning that places can have for us, we can never fully identify the meaning that places have for us. Nicole Note is right in arguing (using the work of Arnold Burms) that the ineffable plays a key role in the meaningful relations we have with the world, and that the experience of meaning can only emerge if there is a real risk that it fails to appear. Therefore, meaning (...)
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  35. Wilderness, Value Of.Michael P. Nelson & John A. Vucetich - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  36. An Ecological Concept of Wilderness. DeLancey - 2012 - Ethics and the Environment 17 (1):25-44.
  37. Buying the Wilderness Experience: The Comodification of the Sublime.Richmond Eustis Jr - 2012 - Perspectives: International Postgraduate Journal of Philosophy 4 (1):22-38.
    This study examines some of the implications of guided wilderness trips against the theoretical framework of the sublime as Kant sets out in the Critique of Judgment. In particular, it focuses on the role of professional guides as providers of distancing protection from wild and dangerous nature—at the same time as they attempt to facilitate a possible aweinspiring encounter with nature in its wild otherness. This exercise of power by capital makes the guide an odd locus of power dynamics—at once (...)
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  38. Walking in Nature.Jason P. Matzke - 2012 - Environment, Space, Place 4 (2):75-88.
    It has been argued by philosophers and cultural historians that the notion of wilderness as it has been developed in the West problematically separates—conceptually and practically—humans from wild nature. The human/wilderness dichotomy, it is said, potentially leads even well-intentioned, environmentally minded people to work for wilderness preservation at the expense of paying attention to our local, lived environment. Although Henry David Thoreau and John Muir are often taken to be key architects of the inherited notion of wilderness, I draw from (...)
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  39. In Wilderness and Wildness.Kate Booth - 2011 - Environmental Ethics 33 (3):283-293.
    There is a complexity of entities and happenings embodied within the pillars that frame the doorways in our homes and support the broad flat spaces that form supermarkets and department stores. Each pillar speaks to the mythology encircling the origins of Gothic architecture; the ideas surrounding the shift from the trunks and boughs of the sacred grove toward the columns, arches, and vaults of church and cathedral. Each pillar embodies the evolution of life and the history of the Earth. Awakening (...)
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  40. In Wilderness and Wildness: Recognizing and Responding Within the Agency of Relational Memory.Kate Booth - 2011 - Environmental Ethics 33 (3):283-293.
    There is a complexity of entities and happenings embodied within the pillars that frame the doorways in our homes and support the broad flat spaces that form supermarkets and department stores. Each pillar speaks to the mythology encircling the origins of Gothic architecture; the ideas surrounding the shift from the trunks and boughs of the sacred grove toward the columns, arches, and vaults of church and cathedral. Each pillar embodies the evolution of life and the history of the Earth. Awakening (...)
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  41. 'Natur' als kulturelles Konzept.Thomas Kirchhoff - 2011 - Zeitschrift für Kulturphilosophie 5 (1):69–96.
    Nature is treated as a reality that is constituted by intersubjective cultural patterns of interpretation. Views of nature are interpreted as reflexions of cultural objectivity. By the example of nature as landscape and nature as wilderness, it is shown that even concrete nature appearing to be directly present has been culturally constituted. By the example of ecology, it becomes clear that cultural ideas direct not only aesthetic and moral but also theoretical judgements of nature. -/- Natur wird thematisiert als Realität, (...)
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  42. Thinking Like a Mountain : Nature, Wilderness, and the Virtue of Humility.Paul Lauritzen - 2011 - In Gregory E. Kaebnick (ed.), The Ideal of Nature: Debates About Biotechnology and the Environment. Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 114.
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  43. 10 Garden, City, or Wilderness? Landscape and Destiny in the Christian Imagination.Philip Sheldrake - 2011 - In Jeff Malpas (ed.), The Place of Landscape: Concepts, Contexts, Studies. MIT Press. pp. 183.
    This chapter focuses on the important role played by landscape in the Christian religious imagination. It argues for the ambiguity of “landscape” in the sense that locales like forests, fields, and mountains are both geographic realities and imaginary realities. Many locales are considered powerful symbols of fear or desire. According to Simon Schama’s Landscape and Memory, “Landscapes are culture before they are nature; constructs of the imagination projected onto wood and water and rock.” This means that landscape is irreducibly historical (...)
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  44. Deceptive Beauties: The World of Wild Orchids.Christian Ziegler, Michael Pollan & Natalie Angier - 2011 - University of Chicago Press.
    This astonishing book features over 150 unprecedented color photographs taken by Christian Ziegler himself as he trekked through wilderness on five continents to capture the diversity and magnificence of orchids in their natural habitats.
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  45. Becoming Animal: An Essay on Wonder.David Abram - 2010 - Pantheon Books.
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  46. Chapter 5. John’s Call From the Wilderness for a Better Guidance of the Way to the Lord.Gitte Buch-Hansen - 2010 - In "It is the Spirit That Gives Life": A Stoic Understanding of Pneuma in John's Gospel. De Gruyter.
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  47. Wilderness as the Place Between Philosophy and Theology: Questioning Martin Drenthen on the Otherness of Nature.Forrest Clingerman - 2010 - Environmental Values 19 (2):211-232.
    This essay addresses how the idea of wilderness is a point of conversation between environmental philosophy and environmental theology. This topic is approached through a conversation with the environmental philosophy of Martin Drenthen. First, I discuss the respective aims of environmental philosophy and environmental theology. Second, I summarise the work of Drenthen on wilderness and otherness. Third, I compare this vision of environmental philosophy and a theological concept of Divine Otherness. Finally I sketch how this exploration is part of a (...)
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  48. Wilderness Into Civilized Shapes.Hans-Georg Erney - 2010 - Environmental Philosophy 7 (2):186-188.
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  49. The Wilderness Debate Rages On: Continuing the Great New Wilderness Debate. [REVIEW]Scott Friskics - 2010 - Environmental Ethics 32 (1):85-90.
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  50. Second Nature New Territories of Wilderness for Unknown Future Colonisation.Adriaan Geuze - 2010 - Topos: European Landscape Magazine 71:40.
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1 — 50 / 189