This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

768 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 768
  1. Ockham's Razor, Truth, and Information.Kevin Kelly - manuscript
    in Handbook of the Philosophy of Information, J. van Behthem and P. Adriaans, eds., to appear.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  2. William of Ockham.Spade Pv - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Eternity and Print How Medieval Ideas of Time Influenced the Development of Mechanical Reproduction of Texts and Images.Bennett Gilbert - 2020 - Contributions to the History of Concepts 15 (1):1-21.
    The methods of intellectual history have not yet been applied to studying the invention of technology for printing texts and images ca. 1375–ca. 1450. One of the several conceptual developments in this period refl ecting the possibility of mechanical replication is a view of the relationship of eternity to durational time based on Gregory of Nyssa’s philosophy of time and William of Ockham’s. Th e article considers how changes in these ideas helped enable the conceptual possibilities of the dissemination of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Thomas, Scotus, and Ockham on the Object of Hope.Thomas M. Osborne - 2020 - Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 87:1-26.
    Thomas Aquinas, John Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham disagree over how and whether virtues are specified by their objects. For Thomas, habits and acts are specified by their formal objects. For instance, the object of theft is something that belongs to someone else, and more particularly theft is distinct from robbery because theft is the open taking of another’s good, whereas robbery is open and violent. A habit such as a virtue or a vice shares or takes the act’s (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Nicola Cusano da Colonia a Roma (1425-1450). Università, politica e umanesimo nel giovane Cusano.Andrea Fiamma - 2019 - Münster, Germania: Aschendorff Verlag.
    Il volume ripercorre lo sviluppo del pensiero del giovane Nicola Cusano dalla frequentazione del maestro albertista Eimerico da Campo presso l’Università di Colonia (1425) e dal confronto con le posizioni filosofiche dei domenicani dello Studium coloniense, fino agli anni della maturità a Roma (1450). Il saggio illustra il contesto storico-culturale della genesi del De docta ignorantia, testo che suggella la presa di distanza di Cusano dal proprio passato universitario ma anche, al contempo, la sua insoddisfazione nei confronti dell’umanesimo diffuso in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Can We Reflexively Access the Contents of Our Own Perceptions? Ockham on the Reflexive Cognition of the Contents of Intuitions.Lydia Deni Gamboa - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 27 (5):921-940.
    ABSTRACTIn the recent secondary literature on Ockham’s philosophy of mind, it has been debated whether Ockham proposed an externalist or an internalist view of the intentional contents of intuitive...
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. From Thomas Aquinas to the 1350s.Eric W. Hagedorn - 2019 - In Thomas Williams (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Ethics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 55-76.
    An overview of debates in ethical theory within Christian Scholasticism in the decades after Thomas Aquinas.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. William of Ockham.Paul Vincent Spade & Claude Panaccio - 2019 - The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Spring 2019 Edition).
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  9. Walter Chatton on Future Contingents: Between Formalism and Ontology, Written by Jon Bornholdt. [REVIEW]Mark Thakkar - 2019 - Vivarium 57 (1-2):210-221.
    This light revision of Bornholdt's doctoral thesis (Würzburg, 2015) is effectively a medievally-oriented follow-up to Richard Gaskin’s 'The Sea Battle and the Master Argument' (1995). The book is stimulating from a philosophical point of view, but the exegesis is disappointingly unreliable.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Ockham on Divine Concurrence.Zita Toth - 2019 - Saint Anselm Journal 15:81-105.
    The focus of this paper is Ockham's stance on the question of divine concurrence---the question whether God is causally active in the causal happenings of the created world, and if so, what God's causal activity amounts to and what place that leaves for created causes. After discussing some preliminaries, I turn to presenting what I take to be Ockham's account. As I show, Ockham, at least in this issue, is rather conservative: he agrees with the majority of medieval thinkers (including (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Introduction: Consequences in Medieval Logic.Jacob Archambault - 2018 - Vivarium 56 (3-4):201-221.
    _ Source: _Volume 56, Issue 3-4, pp 201 - 221 This paper summarizes medieval definitions and divisions of consequences and explains the import of the medieval development of the theory of consequence for logic today. It then introduces the various contributions to this special issue of _Vivarium_ on consequences in medieval logic.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12. Do Not Revise Ockham's Razor Without Necessity.Sam Baron & Jonathan Tallant - 2018 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research (3):596-619.
    Ockham's razor asks that we not multiply entities beyond necessity. The razor is a powerful methodological tool, enabling us to articulate reasons for preferring one theory to another. There are those, however, who would modify the razor. Schaffer, for one, tells us that, ‘I think the proper rendering of Ockham's razor should be ‘Do not multiply fundamental entities without necessity’’. Our aim, here, is to challenge such re-workings of Ockham's razor.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  13. THE FORMALITY OF PETER OF SPAIN's THEORY OF SUPPOSITION.Vlad Ile - 2018 - Studia Universitatis Babes-Bolyai-Philosophia 3 (63):11-30.
    Relatively recent literature on supposition theory seems to use different modern logical tools of interpretation that can be generally described as formalizations. Since the act of formalizing may be understood as a process of changing its object in the sense of making it more formal, an assessment of this kind of approaches is necessary. Accordingly, our main goal in this paper is to analyze the formality of Peter of Spain’s theory of supposition and to evaluate its interpretation as a quantification (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Ockham on Awareness of One’s Acts: A Way Out of the Circle.Sonja Schierbaum - 2018 - Society and Politics 12 (2):08-27.
    In this paper, I proceed from the assumption that Ockham’s account of self-awareness can be correctly described as a kind of higher-order approach, because just like modern higher-order theorists, Ockham accounts for a mental act being conscious in terms of a higher-order act that takes the act as its object. I aim to defend Ockham’s approach against the objection that it fails to provide an explanation of how self-awareness comes about because any such explanation would be circular. Part of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Intellectual Memory and Consciousness in Descartes’s Philosophy of Mind.Dániel Schmal - 2018 - Society and Politics 12 (2):28-49.
    Although Descartes’s ideas regarding consciousness and memory have been studied extensively, few attempts have been made to address their systemic relations. In order to redress this deficiency, I argue in favor of three interrelated theses. The first is that intellectual memory has a crucial role to play in Descartes’s concept of consciousness, especially when it comes to explaining higher forms of consciousness. Second, the connection between memory and consciousness has been obscured by the fact that intellectual memory, taken as a (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Causation and Mental Content: Against the Externalist Interpretation of Ockham.Susan Brower-Toland - 2017 - In Magali Elise Roques & Jenny Pelletier (eds.), The Language of Thought in Late Medieval Philosophy. Essays in Honour of Claude Panaccio.
    On the dominant interpretation, Ockham is an externalist about mental content. This reading is founded principally on his theory of intuitive cognition. Intuitive cognition plays a foundational role in Ockham’s account of concept formation and judgment, and Ockham insists that the content of intuitive states is determined by the causal relations such states bear to their objects. The aim of this paper is to challenge the externalist interpretation by situating Ockham’s account of intuitive cognition vis-à-vis his broader account of efficient (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Science, God and Ockham’s Razor.David Glass - 2017 - Philosophical Studies 174 (5):1145-1161.
    In discussions about the existence of God, it is sometimes claimed that the progress of science has removed the need for God. This paper uses a Bayesian analysis of Ockham’s razor to formulate and evaluate this argument, which is referred to as the science explains away God argument. Four different strategies for responding to this argument are presented and evaluated. It is argued that one of these strategies highlights how difficult it is to show that the conditions for applying Ockham’s (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Zelfpredicatie: Middeleeuwse en hedendaagse perspectieven.Jan Heylen & Can Laurens Löwe - 2017 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 79 (2):239-258.
    The focus of the article is the self-predication principle, according to which the/a such-and-such is such-and-such. We consider contemporary approaches (Frege, Russell, Meinong) to the self-predication principle, as well as fourteenth-century approaches (Burley, Ockham, Buridan). In crucial ways, the Ockham-Buridan view prefigures Russell’s view, and Burley’s view shows a striking resemblance to Meinong’s view. In short the Russell-Ockham-Buridan view holds: no existence, no truth. The Burley-Meinong view holds, in short: intelligibility suffices for truth. Both views approach self-predication in a uniform (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. L’essentialisme de Guillaume d’ockham magali roques Paris, vrin, 2016 , 228 P. [REVIEW]Roxane Noël - 2017 - Dialogue 56 (1):194-196.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. The Metatheoretical Framework of William of Ockham’s Modal Logic.Ernesto Perini-Santos - 2017 - In Magali Elise Roques & Jenny Pelletier (eds.), The Language of Thought in Late Medieval Philosophy. Cham, Switzerland: Springer. pp. 137-147.
    Ockham has a very particular definition of modality: every term that is predicable of a whole sentence is a modal term. His definition reaches well beyond “necessary,” “possible,” “contingent” and “impossible,” including predicates such as “known” and “believed,” but also “written” and “spoken.” He provides a general framework for inferences including every term covered by his definition of modality. However, there is a proper modal syllogistic in Ockham only for the Aristotelian modalities, that combines two distinct semantic apparatus, constituted by (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. William of Ockham on the Instant of Change.Magali Roques - 2017 - Vivarium 55 (1-3):130-151.
    Ockham’s approach to the problem of the instant of change as it is found in the Summa logicae i, chapter 5, and ii, chapter 19, is usually described as “purely logical,” narrowing the treatment of “begins” and “ceases” to simplistic cases. The aim of this paper is to complement our knowledge of Ockham’s position on the problem of the instant of change by analysing the treatment of the problem he gives in his questions on the Physics 98-101. In these passages, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22. The Philosophy of Piers Plowman: The Ethics and Epistemology of Love in Late Medieval Thought.David Strong - 2017 - Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing.
    This book examines William Langland’s late medieval poem, The Vision of Piers Plowman, in light of contemporary intellectual thought. David Strong argues that where the philosophers John Duns Scotus and William of Ockham revolutionize the view of human potential through their theories of epistemology, ethics, and freedom of the will, Langland vivifies these ideas by contextualizing them in an individual’s search for truth and love. Specifically, the text ponders the intersection between reason and the will in expressing love. While scholars (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Mathematics and Physics of First and Last Instants: Walter Burley and William of Ockham.Edith Dudley Sylla - 2017 - Vivarium 55 (1-3):103-129.
    In his De primo et ultimo instanti, Walter Burley paid careful attention to continuity, assuming that continua included and were limited by indivisibles such as instants, points, ubi, degrees of quality, or mutata esse. In his Tractatus primus, Burley applied the logic of first and last instants to reach novel conclusions about qualities and qualitative change. At the end of his Quaestiones in libros Physicorum Aristotelis, William of Ockham used long passages from Burley’s Tractatus primus, sometimes agreeing with Burley and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Articulating Medieval Logic by Terence Parsons. [REVIEW]Mark Thakkar - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (2):348-349.
    One of the founding myths of analytic philosophy is that the predicate logic that was developed in the late 19th century was far more powerful than its predecessors. This ambitious book argues on the contrary that medieval philosophers developed "a system of logic that is similar to the predicate calculus in richness and power" – or that, as Parsons put it in his presidential address to the APA, "the core of medieval logic is as accurate and as expressive as the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Aquinas on the Problem of Universals.Jeffrey E. Brower - 2016 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 92 (2):715-735.
  26. Divine Production in Late Medieval Trinitarian Theology: Henry of Ghent, Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham by JT Paasch. Oxford Theological Monographs, Oxford University Press, 2012.Mark Henninger - 2016 - Heythrop Journal 57 (2):432-433.
  27. Ockhams Theorie der Modalitäten: Metaphysische, Natürliche Und Historische Notwendigkeit.Lu Jiang - 2016 - Berlin: Logos Verlag.
    Mit seiner Summa Logicae, einer umfangreichen und systematischen Darstellung der aristotelischen Logik, gilt Ockham als einer der größten Logiker des Mittelalters. Dort entwickelt Ockham seine Modallogik zu einer systematischen Größe, die nicht zuletzt mittelalterliche Innovationen und Entdeckungen enthält, wie z.B. Gesetze modaler Aussagenlogik, die Aristoteles nicht kennt. In der vorliegenden Arbeit wird bemüht, solche Aspekte systematisch darzustellen. Der formale Teil der vorliegenden Untersuchung wird durch eine ausführliche semantische Analyse der Modalbegriffe bei Ockham ergänzt, die zeigen soll, wie Ockhams Modallogik mit (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Metter le brache al mondo. Compatibilismo, conoscenza e libertà.Roberto Limonta & Riccardo Fedriga - 2016 - Milano: Jaca Book.
    È possibile ammettere, pensare e addirittura verificare che una cosa che sia accaduta nel passato possa non essere più accaduta in un momento presente? Ad esempio, si può, oggi, fare in modo che Roma non sia mai stata fondata? Come è possibile mutare la regolare causalità degli accadimenti di quel passato – il nostro e quello degli uomini che ci hanno preceduti – che sembra essere fondato sui vincoli di una strettissima necessità? E che dire quando questo sconvolgimento dell’ordine del (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. L'Essentialisme de Guillaume d'Ockham.Roques Magali - 2016 - Paris: Vrin.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Quantification and Measurement of Qualities at the Beginning of the Fourteenth Century. The Case of William of Ockham.Roques Magali - 2016 - Documenti E Studi Sulla Tradizione Filosofica Medievale 27:347-380.
    This paper critically examines the debate between William of Ockham and his contemporary Peter Auriol on how to account for the intension and remission of forms. Peter Auriol denies that an added degree of a quality such as the theological virtue of charity could be anything other than something which is neither a universal nor an individual and which cannot be grasped by intuition, but must be posited in order to account for the possibility that an accidental form can vary (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31. Soberania popular na crise do século XIV e o surgimento do conceito forte de soberania: Marsílio de Pádua, Guilherme de Ockham e Jean Bodin.Saulo de Matos - 2016 - RiHumSo Revista de Investigación Del Departamento de Humanidades y Ciencias Sociales 1 (10):94-119.
    This article analyzes the significance of the concepts “sovereignty” and “popular sovereignty” regarding the construction of modern law. Modern law isdefined in this study as a language of subjective rights (claim, liberty, power and immunity) and therefore has a nomological and authoritative character. The shift from low Middle-age to the beginning of Modernity seems to be the decisive period to understand the construction of modern law, due to the reception of Aristotle’s political writings and Roman law, aside from the rejection (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. William of Ockham’s Ontology of Arithmetic.Magali Roques - 2016 - Vivarium 54 (2-3):146-165.
    Ockham’s ontology of arithmetic, specifically his position on the ontological status of natural numbers, has not yet attracted the attention of scholars. Yet it occupies a central role in his nominalism; specifically, Ockham’s position on numbers constitutes a third part of his ontological reductionism, alongside his doctrines of universals and the categories, which have long been recognized to constitute the first two parts. That is, the first part of this program claims that the very idea of a universal thing is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. How Chatton Changed Ockham’s Mind.Susan Brower-Toland - 2015 - In Gyula Klima (ed.), Intentionality, Cognition and Mental Representation in Medieval Philosophy. Fordham University Press. pp. 204-234.
    It is well-known that Chatton is among the earliest and most vehement critics of Ockham’s theory of judgment, but scholars have overlooked the role Chatton’s criticisms play in shaping Ockham’s final account. In this paper, I demonstrate that Ockham’s most mature treatment of judgment not only contains revisions that resolve the problems Chatton identifies in his earlier theories, but also that these revisions ultimately bring his final account of the objects of judgment surprisingly close to Chatton’s own. Even so, I (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  34. Ms. Merton 284 Tra Scoto Ed Ockham.Francesco Fiorentino - 2015 - Franciscan Studies 73:81-145.
    Come ho osservato altrove2, il ms. Oxford, Merton, 284 è composito: consiste di 117 fogli prevalentemente cartacei, tranne i primi quattro di guardia e i ff. 112–113, che sono pergamenacei. Esso misura mediamente 287 × 223 mm3. L’esame della filigrana attesta la produzione delle carte a Siena intorno al 13404. Sul verso della terza carta di guardia si trova una nota marginale che denuncia l’origine e il possesso del codice, ossia «Liber Iohannis Bloxham ex legat’ M. Symonis Lamborne / Iste (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Ockham's Scientia Argument for Mental Language.Eric W. Hagedorn - 2015 - Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy 3 (1):145-168.
    William Ockham held that, in addition to written and spoken language, there exists a mental language, a structured representational system common to all thinking beings. Here I present and evaluate an argument found in several places across Ockham's corpus, wherein he argues that positing a mental language is necessary for the nominalist to meet certain ontological constraints imposed by Aristotle’s account of scientific demonstration.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Ockham and Buridan on the Ampliation of Modal Propositions.Spencer Johnston - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (2):234-255.
    This paper explores a currently unnoticed argument used by John Buridan to defend his analysis of modal propositions and to reject the analysis of modal propositions of necessity put forward by William of Ockham. First, I explore this argument and, by considering possible responses of Ockham to Buridan, show some of the ways in which Ockham seems to be keeping closer to Aristotle's remarks about modal propositions in Prior Analytics, 18.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  37. The Early Reception of Peter Auriol at Oxford.Rondo Keele - 2015 - Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 82:301-361.
    The important impact of the French Franciscan Peter Auriol (ca. 1280-1322) upon contemporary philosophical theology at Oxford is well known and has been well documented and analyzed, at least for a narrow range of issues, particularly in epistemology. This article attempts a more systematic treatment of his effects upon Oxford debates across a broader range of subjects and over a more expansive duration of time than has been done previously. Topics discussed include grace and merit, future contingents and divine foreknowledge, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Intentionality, Cognition, and Mental Representation in Medieval Philosophy.Gyula Klima (ed.) - 2015 - Fordham University Press.
    It is supposed to be common knowledge about the history of ideas that one of the few medieval philosophical contributions preserved in modern philosophical thought is the idea that mental phenomena are distinguished from physical phenomena by their intentionality, their directedness toward some object. As is usually the case with such commonplaces about the history of ideas, this claim is not quite true. Medieval philosophers routinely described ordinary physical phenomena, such as reflections in mirrors or sounds in the air, as (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39. Ockham’s Calculus of Strict Implication.Wolfgang Lenzen - 2015 - Logica Universalis 9 (2):181-191.
    In his main work Summa Logicae written around 1323, William of Ockham developed a system of propositional modal logic which contains almost all theorems of a modern calculus of strict implication. This calculus is formally reconstructed here with the help of modern symbols for the operators of conjunction, disjunction, implication, negation, possibility, and necessity.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Prophetae non dixerunt falsum.Roberto Limonta & Riccardo Fedriga - 2015 - Documenti E Studi Sulla Tradizione Filosofica Medievale 26:399-432.
    In this article we intend to explore the use of the prophetic statements in some epistemic models of XIVth-century theology. Specifically, we shall focus on Peter Auriol’s and William of Ockham’s theories : although they lead to different solutions, these theories are grounded on a common linguistic approach to the topic. For XIVth-century theologians, the prophecy becomes a kind of epistemic test, useful to verify coherence and firmness of the theories of knowledge. Peter Auriol manages to reconcile divine foreknowledge, future (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Chatton and Ockham: A Fourteenth Century Discussion on Philosophical and Theological Concepts of God.Jenny Pelletier - 2015 - Franciscan Studies 73:147-167.
    In one of his Quodlibeta, William of Ockham entertains two concepts of God, one theological and the other philosophical. He argues that conclusions involving a theological concept of God are believable and can only be established in theology where recourse to faith is permissible. By contrast, conclusions involving a philosophical concept of God are knowable and can be proved in philosophy and theology. The source of these two concepts lies in the Sentences commentary of his confrère Walter Chatton,1 who explores (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Book Review: William Ockham on Metaphysics: The Science of Being and God, Written by Jenny E. Pelletier. [REVIEW]Christian Rode - 2015 - Vivarium 53 (1):129-131.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Le Principe d'Économie d'Après Guillaume d'Ockham.Magali Roques - 2015 - Franciscan Studies 73:169-197.
    Le but de cet article est de proposer une nouvelle interprétation de la nature et de la fonction du principe d’économie tel qu’il est formulé et employé par Guillaume d’Ockham. Je défends l’idée que le principe d’économie tel qu’il est employé par Guillaume d’Ockham peut être compris comme un précepte méthodologique à suivre pour procéder à une inférence vers la meilleure explication. Je me propose donc de répondre aux deux questions suivantes. En quoi un argument d’économie consiste-t-il et quelle est (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Ockham’s Razors: A User’s Manual.Elliott Sober - 2015 - Cambridge University Press.
    Ockham's razor, the principle of parsimony, states that simpler theories are better than theories that are more complex. It has a history dating back to Aristotle and it plays an important role in current physics, biology, and psychology. The razor also gets used outside of science - in everyday life and in philosophy. This book evaluates the principle and discusses its many applications. Fascinating examples from different domains provide a rich basis for contemplating the principle's promises and perils. It is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   42 citations  
  45. William Ockham on the Scope and Limits of Consciousness.Susan Brower-Toland - 2014 - Vivarium 52 (3-4):197-219.
    Ockham holds what nowadays would be characterized as a “higher-order perception” theory of consciousness. Among the most common objections to such a theory is the charge that it gives rise to an infinite regress in higher-order states. In this paper, I examine Ockham’s various responses to the regress problem, focusing in particular on his attempts to restrict the scope of consciousness so as to avoid it. In his earlier writings, Ockham holds that we are conscious only of those states to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  46. Pelletier, Jenny E., William of Ockham on Metaphysics. [REVIEW]Jude P. Dougherty - 2014 - Review of Metaphysics 68 (1):192-194.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Lex Libertatis Und Ius Naturale Freiheitsgesetz Und Naturrechtslehre Bei Wilhelm von Ockham.Anne Eusterschulte - 2014 - In Guy Guldentops & Andreas Speer (eds.), Das Gesetz - the Law - la Loi. De Gruyter. pp. 399-424.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. The Threefold Object of the Scientific Knowledge. Pseudo-Scotus and the Literature on the Meteorologica in Fourteenth-Century Paris.Lucian Petrescu - 2014 - Franciscan Studies 72:465-502.
  49. Le Principe d'Économie d'Après Guillaume d'Ockham.Magali Roques - 2014 - Franciscan Studies 72:373-409.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. La Sémantique Ockhamiste des Catégories. Essai de Reconstruction.Magali Roques - 2014 - Vivarium 52 (1-2):49-71.
    In this paper, I intend to reconstruct Ockham’s semantics of the categories in order to prove first that his semantics is consistent. Second, Ockham is not skeptical about the possibility to derive the categories from primitives. According to Ockham, one must accept two principles in order to derive the categories. The first is the principle of ‘in quid’ predication, according to which a name of category can be predicated ‘in quid’ of a determined class of terms. The second is the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
1 — 50 / 768