This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:

16 found
Order:
  1. Acheloios, Thales, and the Origin of Philosophy: A Response to the Neo-Marxians.Nicholas Molinari - 2022 - Oxford: Archaeopress.
    This book presents a new account of Thales based on the idea that Acheloios, a deity equated with water in the ancient Greek world and found in Miletos during Thales’ life, was the most important cultic deity influencing the thinker, profoundly shaping his philosophical worldview. In doing so, it also weighs in on the metaphysical and epistemological dichotomy that seemingly underlies all academia—the antithesis of the methodological postulate of Marxian dialectical materialism vis-à-vis the Platonic idea of fundamentally real transcendental forms. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Epistemology Within a Theological Framework - Tor Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology. A Study of Hesiod, Xenophanes and Parmenides. Pp. XIV + 406. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017. Cased, £90, Us$120. Isbn: 978-1-107-02816-6. [REVIEW]Dariusz Kubok - 2019 - The Classical Review 69 (1):20-22.
  3. The Reception of Hesiod by the Early Presocratics.Mitchell Miller - 2018 - In Alexander Loney & Stephen Scully (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Hesiod. New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 207-225.
    The early Presocratics’ major speculative and critical initiatives—in particular, Anaximander’s conceptions of the justice of the cosmos and of the apeiron as its archē and Xenophanes’s polemics against immorality and anthropomorphism in the depiction of the gods and against any claim to divine inspiration—appear to break with Hesiod’s form of thought. But the conceptual, critical, and ethical depth of Hesiod’s own rethinking of the lore that he inherits complicates this picture. Close examination of each of their major initiatives together with (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. A Woven Web of Guesses: Xenophanes of Colophon.Henri van Nispen - 2018 - Apeiron 51 (4):391-403.
    Journal Name: Apeiron Issue: Ahead of print.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Gods and Fossils: Inference and Scientific Method in Xenophanes' Philosophy.Michael Papazian - 2016 - In Davide Tanasi Heather Reid (ed.), Philosopher Kings and Tragic Heroes. Parnassos Press. pp. 61-78.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Feuerbach, Xenophanes and the All Too Human God.David Torrijos-Castrillejo - 2015 - In Gabriela Blebea Nicolae (ed.), Credința în época secularizării. Editura Arhiepiscopiei Romano-Catolice. pp. 179-192.
    Feuerbach is known for his unmasking of the concept of God insofar he solved it in a celestial idealization of the human essence. Xenophanes already rejected the popular idea of the gods, which were described as deified human beings. Our purpose is to compare the process both thinkers followed, because both set the human as the focus of their arguments. Xenophanes’ divinity retained some aspect in common with humans and such a God, despite his diversity from men and his transcendence, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Likeness and Likelihood in the Presocratics and Plato. By Jenny Bryan. [REVIEW]William H. Altman - 2013 - Ancient Philosophy 33 (1):194-198.
  8. Ksenofanes z Kolofonu i greckie źródła problemu poznania.Dariusz Kubok - 2013 - Analiza I Egzystencja 23:5-23.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  9. Likeness and Likelihood in the Presocratics and Plato.Jenny Bryan - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Greek word eoikos can be translated in various ways. It can be used to describe similarity, plausibility or even suitability. This book explores the philosophical exploitation of its multiple meanings by three philosophers, Xenophanes, Parmenides and Plato. It offers new interpretations of the way that each employs the term to describe the status of their philosophy, tracing the development of this philosophical use of eoikos from the fallibilism of Xenophanes through the deceptive cosmology of Parmenides to Plato's Timaeus. The (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  10. Gli Inizi Della Filosofia, in Grecia.Maria Michela Sassi - 2009 - Bollati Boringhieri.
  11. Xenophanes of Colophon: Fragments. A Text and Translation with a Commentary.H. Schibli - 1995 - Ancient Philosophy 15 (2):590-598.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Xenophanes of Colophon: Fragments. A Text and Translation with a Commentary. [REVIEW]H. Schibli - 1995 - Ancient Philosophy 15 (2):590.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Xenophanes J. H. Lesher: Xenophanes of Colophon: Fragments, a Text and Translation with a Commentary. (Phoenix Supplementary Vol. XXX, Presocratics Vol. IV.) Pp. Xvi + 264. Toronto, Buffalo and London: University of Toronto Press, 1992. $50/£29.95. [REVIEW]F. R. Pickering - 1993 - The Classical Review 43 (02):232-233.
  14. Xenophanes on Inquiry and Discovery: An Altemative to the 'Hymn to Progress' Reading of Fr. 18.J. Lesher - 1991 - Ancient Philosophy 11 (2):229-248.
    In fragment B 18 (DK) Xenophanes asserts that ‘Not from the outset did the gods reveal all things to mortals’ but that ‘in time, as they seek, men discover better.’ The remark has been understood in different ways but is usually read as a rejection of the view of the gods as the givers of all good things and an expression of faith in the capacity of human beings to make progress through their own efforts. I argue that the ‘hymn (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  15. Xenophanes Mario Untersteiner: Senofane, Testimonianze e Frammenti, Introduzione, traduzione e commento. (Biblioteca di Studi Superiori, xxxiii.) Pp. cclxxx + 155. Florence: La Nuova Italia, 1956. Paper, L. 4,000. [REVIEW]G. B. Kerferd - 1957 - The Classical Review 7 (3-4):203-204.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Fragments of Parmenides.Irfan Ajvazi - manuscript
    Putting all of his faith in the power of abstract reason, Parmenides argues in his poem that genuine knowledge can only involve being, and that non-being is literally unspeakable and unthinkable. Using only the premise that "what is" is and what "is not" is not, he proceeds to deduce the nature of reality. The reality he arrives at bears no resemblance at all to the world we experience around us through our senses. -/- When starting out on a rational inquiry, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark