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Introduction

Isis 103:710-715 (2012)

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  1. Science and Self-Assessment: Phrenological Charts 1840–1940.Fenneke Sysling - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Science 51 (2):261-280.
    This paper looks at phrenological charts as mediators of scientific knowledge to individual clients who used them as a means of self-assessment. Phrenologists propagated the idea that the human mind could be categorized into different mental faculties, with each particular faculty represented in a different area of the brain and by bumps on the head. In the US and the UK popular phrenologists examined individual clients for a fee. Drawing on a collection of phrenological charts completed for individual clients, this (...)
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  • Carl Linnaeus's Botanical Paper Slips.Isabelle Charmantier & Staffan Müller-Wille - 2014 - Intellectual History Review 24 (2):215-238.
  • Identification Keys, the "Natural Method," and the Development of Plant Identification Manuals.Sara T. Scharf - 2009 - Journal of the History of Biology 42 (1):73 - 117.
    The origins of field guides and other plant identification manuals have been poorly understood until now because little attention has been paid to 18th century botanical identification guides. Identification manuals came to have the format we continue to use today when botanical instructors in post-Revolutionary France combined identification keys (step-wise analyses focusing on distinctions between plants) with the "natural method" (clustering of similar plants, allowing for identification by gestalt) and alphabetical indexes. Botanical works featuring multiple but linked techniques to enable (...)
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  • Identification Keys, the “Natural Method,” and the Development of Plant Identification Manuals.Sara T. Scharf - 2009 - Journal of the History of Biology 42 (1):73-117.
    The origins of field guides and other plant identification manuals have been poorly understood until now because little attention has been paid to 18th century botanical identification guides. Identification manuals came to have the format we continue to use today when botanical instructors in post-Revolutionary France combined identification keys with the "natural method" and alphabetical indexes. Botanical works featuring multiple but linked techniques to enable plant identification became very popular in France by the first decade of the 19th century. British (...)
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